none
authorCraig Cook <cncook001@yahoo.com>
Thu, 28 Apr 2005 18:23:04 +0000 (18:23 +0000)
committerCraig Cook <cncook001@yahoo.com>
Thu, 28 Apr 2005 18:23:04 +0000 (18:23 +0000)
37 files changed:
AFSLore/AFSQuickStartGuideforUNIX.mdwn
AFSLore/BuildingAFSintotheDigitalUNIXKernel.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/BuildingAFSintotheHP-UXKernel.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/BuildingAFSintotheIRIXKernel.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/ConfiguringServerVolumesonAIX.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/ConfiguringServerVolumesonDigitalUNIX.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/ConfiguringServerVolumesonHP-UX.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/ConfiguringServerVolumesonIRIX.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/ConfiguringServerVolumesonLinux.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/ConfiguringServerVolumesonSolaris.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/ConfiguringtheAFS-modifiedfsckProgramonHP-UXSystems.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/ConfiguringtheAFS-modifiedfsckProgramonSolarisSystems.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/ConfiguringtheCache.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/ConfiguringtheCacheManager.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/ConfirmCacheManagerInitialization.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/CreatingtheClientCellServDBFile.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/EnablingAFSLoginonAIXSystems.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/EnablingAFSLoginonDigitalUNIXSystems.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/EnablingAFSLoginonHP-UXSystems.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/EnablingAFSLoginonIRIXSystems.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/EnablingAFSLoginonLinuxSystems.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/EnablingAFSLoginonSolarisSystems.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/InitializationScriptonAIX.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/InitializationScriptonDigitalUNIX.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/InitializationScriptonHP-UX.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/InitializationScriptonIRIX.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/InitializationScriptonLinux.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/InitializationScriptonSolaris.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/InstallingAdditionalClientMachines.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/InstallingAdditionalServerMachines.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/InstallingtheFirstAFSMachine.mdwn
AFSLore/LoadingAFSintotheAIXKernel.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/LoadingAFSintotheIRIXKernel.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/LoadingAFSintotheLinuxKernel.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/LoadingAFSintotheSolarisKernel.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/ReplacingthefsckProgramHelperonAIXSystems.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]
AFSLore/ReplacingthefsckProgramonDigitalUNIXSystems.mdwn [new file with mode: 0644]

index 4f80cba..edcb1e9 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,45 @@
 - [[Installing the First AFS Machine|Main/InstallingTheFirstAFSMachine]]
 - [[Installing Additional Server Machines|Main/InstallingAdditionalServerMachines]]
+- [[Installing Additional Client Machines|Main/InstallingAdditionalClientMachines]]
+
+# <a name="Sub Documents linked from the ab"></a> Sub Documents linked from the above docs - Do not use them directly
+
+- [[Loading AFS into the AIX Kernel|Main/LoadingAFSIntoTheAIXKernel]]
+- [[Enabling AFS Login on AIX Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnAIXSystems]]
+- [[Building AFS into the Digital UNIX Kernel|Main/BuildingAFSIntoTheDigitalUNIXKernel]]
+- [[Enabling AFS Login on Digital UNIX Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnDigitalUNIXSystems]]
+
+- [[Building AFS into the HP-UX Kernel|Main/BuildingAFSIntoTheHP-UXKernel]]
+- [[Enabling AFS Login on HP-UX Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnHP-UXSystems]]
+- [[Loading AFS into the IRIX Kernel|Main/LoadingAFSIntoTheIRIXKernel]]
+- [[Building AFS into the IRIX Kernel|Main/BuildingAFSIntoTheIRIXKernel]]
+- [[Enabling AFS Login on IRIX Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnIRIXSystems]]
+
+- [[Loading AFS into the Linux Kernel|Main/LoadingAFSIntoTheLinuxKernel]]
+- [[Enabling AFS Login on Linux Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnLinuxSystems]]
+
+- [[Loading AFS into the Solaris Kernel|Main/LoadingAFSIntoTheSolarisKernel]]
+- [[Enabling AFS Login on Solaris Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnSolarisSystems]]
+
+- [[Creating the Client CellServDB File|Main/CreatingTheClientCellServDBFile]]
+- [[Configuring the Cache|Main/ConfiguringTheCache]]
+- [[Configuring the Cache Manager|Main/ConfiguringTheCacheManager]]
+- [[Initialization Script on AIX|Main/InitializationScriptOnAIX]]
+- [[Initialization Script on IRIX|Main/InitializationScriptOnIRIX]]
+- [[Initialization Script on Digital UNIX|Main/InitializationScriptOnDigitalUNIX]]
+- [[Initialization Script on HP-UX|Main/InitializationScriptOnHP-UX]]
+- [[Initialization Script on Linux|Main/InitializationScriptOnLinux]]
+- [[Initialization Script on Solaris|Main/InitializationScriptOnSolaris]]
+- [[Confirm Cache Manager Initialization|Main/ConfirmCacheManagerInitialization]]
+- [[Configuring Server Volumes on AIX|Main/ConfiguringServerVolumesOnAIX]]
+- [[Configuring Server Volumes on IRIX|Main/ConfiguringServerVolumesOnIRIX]]
+- [[Configuring Server Volumes on Digital UNIX|Main/ConfiguringServerVolumesOnDigitalUNIX]]
+- [[Configuring Server Volumes on HP-UX|Main/ConfiguringServerVolumesOnHP-UX]]
+- [[Configuring Server Volumes on Linux|Main/ConfiguringServerVolumesOnLinux]]
+- [[Configuring Server Volumes on Solaris|Main/ConfiguringServerVolumesOnSolaris]]
+- [[Configuring the AFS-modified fsck Program on Solaris Systems|Main/ConfiguringTheAFS-modifiedFsckProgramOnSolarisSystems]]
+- [[configuring the AFS-modified fsck Program on HP-UX Systems|Main/ConfiguringTheAFS-modifiedFsckProgramOnHP-UXSystems]]
+- [[Replacing the fsck Program on Digital UNIX Systems|Main/ReplacingTheFsckProgramOnDigitalUNIXSystems]]
+- [[Replacing the fsck Program Helper on AIX Systems|Main/ReplacingTheFsckProgramHelperOnAIXSystems]]
 
 -- [[CraigCook]] - 30 Mar 2005
diff --git a/AFSLore/BuildingAFSintotheDigitalUNIXKernel.mdwn b/AFSLore/BuildingAFSintotheDigitalUNIXKernel.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..24f5cf7
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,111 @@
+The sysconfig program is the dynamic kernel loader provided for Digital UNIX systems.
+
+For AFS to function correctly, the sysconfig program must run each time the machine reboots, so the AFS initialization script (included on the AFS CD-ROM) invokes it automatically. In this section you copy the appropriate AFS library file to the location where the sysconfig program accesses it and then run the script.
+
+## <a name="Building AFS into the Digital UN"></a> Building AFS into the Digital UNIX Kernel
+
+Use the following instructions to build AFS modifications into the kernel on a Digital UNIX system.
+
+1. Create a copy called AFS of the basic kernel configuration file included in the Digital UNIX distribution as /usr/sys/conf/machine\_name, where machine\_name is the machine's hostname in all uppercase letters.
+
+       # cd /usr/sys/conf
+
+       # cp machine_name AFS
+
+1. Add AFS to the list of options in the configuration file you created in the previous step, so that the result looks like the following:
+
+              .                   .
+              .                   .
+           options               UFS
+           options               NFS
+           options               AFS
+              .                   .
+              .                   .
+
+1. Add an entry for AFS to two places in the file /usr/sys/conf/files.
+
+\* Add a line for AFS to the list of OPTIONS, so that the result looks like the following:
+
+                 .                .      .
+                 .                .      .
+          OPTIONS/nfs          optional nfs
+          OPTIONS/afs          optional afs
+          OPTIONS/nfs_server   optional nfs_server
+                 .                .      .
+                 .                .      .
+
+\* Add an entry for AFS to the list of MODULES, so that the result looks like the following:
+
+                 .                  .        .          .
+                 .                  .        .          .
+          #
+          MODULE/nfs_server       optional nfs_server Binary
+          nfs/nfs_server.c      module nfs_server optimize -g3
+          nfs/nfs3_server.c       module nfs_server optimize -g3
+          #
+          MODULE/afs            optional afs Binary
+          afs/libafs.c          module afs
+          #
+
+1. Add an entry for AFS to two places in the file /usr/sys/vfs/vfs\_conf.c.
+
+\* Add AFS to the list of defined file systems, so that the result looks like the following:
+
+            .       .
+            .       .
+         #include <afs.h>
+         #if defined(AFS) && AFS
+                extern struct vfsops afs_vfsops;
+         #endif
+            .       .
+            .       .
+
+\* Put a declaration for AFS in the vfssw[] table's MOUNT\_ADDON slot, so that the result looks like the following:
+
+            .                          .              .
+            .                          .              .
+          &fdfs_vfsops,         "fdfs",   /* 12 = MOUNT_FDFS */
+       #if   defined(AFS)
+          &afs_vfsops,          "afs",
+       #else
+          (struct vfsops *)0,   "",       /* 13 = MOUNT_ADDON */
+       #endif
+       #if NFS && INFS_DYNAMIC
+           &nfs3_vfsops,        "nfsv3",  /* 14 = MOUNT_NFS3 */
+
+1. Mount the AFS CD-ROM for Digital UNIX on the local /cdrom directory. For instructions on mounting CD-ROMs (either locally or remotely via NFS), see your Digital UNIX documentation. Then change directory as indicated.
+
+       # cd /cdrom/alpha_dux40/root.client
+
+1. Copy the AFS initialization script to the local directory for initialization files (by convention, /sbin/init.d on Digital UNIX machines). Note the removal of the .rc extension as you copy the script.
+
+       # cp usr/vice/etc/afs.rc  /sbin/init.d/afs
+
+1. Copy the AFS kernel module to the local /usr/sys/BINARY directory.
+
+If the machine's kernel supports NFS server functionality:
+
+       # cp bin/libafs.o /usr/sys/BINARY/afs.mod
+
+If the machine's kernel does not support NFS server functionality:
+
+       # cp bin/libafs.nonfs.o /usr/sys/BINARY/afs.mod
+
+1. Configure and build the kernel. Respond to any prompts by pressing . The resulting kernel resides in the file /sys/AFS/vmunix.
+
+       # doconfig -c AFS
+
+1. Rename the existing kernel file and copy the new, AFS-modified file to the standard location.
+
+       # mv /vmunix /vmunix_noafs
+
+       # cp /sys/AFS/vmunix /vmunix
+
+10. Reboot the machine to start using the new kernel, and login again as the superuser root.
+
+       # cd /
+
+       # shutdown -r now
+
+       login: root
+       Password: root_password
diff --git a/AFSLore/BuildingAFSintotheHP-UXKernel.mdwn b/AFSLore/BuildingAFSintotheHP-UXKernel.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..3b88aaa
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,73 @@
+Use the following instructions to build AFS modifications into the kernel on an HP-UX system.
+
+On HP-UX systems, you must build AFS modifications into a new static kernel; HP-UX does not support dynamic loading. If the machine's hardware and software configuration exactly matches another HP-UX machine on which AFS is already built into the kernel, you can choose to copy the kernel from that machine to this one. In general, however, it is better to build AFS modifications into the kernel on each machine according to the following instructions.
+
+1. Move the existing kernel-related files to a safe location.
+
+       # cp /stand/vmunix /stand/vmunix.noafs
+
+       # cp /stand/system /stand/system.noafs
+
+1. Mount the AFS CD-ROM for HP-UX on the local /cdrom directory. For instructions on mounting CD-ROMs (either locally or remotely via NFS), see your HP-UX documentation. Then change directory as indicated.
+
+       # cd /cdrom/hp_ux110/root.client
+
+1. Copy the AFS initialization file to the local directory for initialization files (by convention, /sbin/init.d on HP-UX machines). Note the removal of the .rc extension as you copy the file.
+
+       # cp usr/vice/etc/afs.rc  /sbin/init.d/afs
+
+1. Copy the file afs.driver to the local /usr/conf/master.d directory, changing its name to afs as you do.
+
+       # cp  usr/vice/etc/afs.driver  /usr/conf/master.d/afs
+
+1. Copy the AFS kernel module to the local /usr/conf/lib directory.
+
+If the machine's kernel supports NFS server functionality:
+
+       # cp bin/libafs.a /usr/conf/lib
+
+If the machine's kernel does not support NFS server functionality, change the file's name as you copy it:
+
+       # cp bin/libafs.nonfs.a /usr/conf/lib/libafs.a
+
+1. Incorporate the AFS driver into the kernel, either using the SAM program or a series of individual commands.
+
+\* To use the SAM program:
+
+1. 1. 1. 1. 1. Invoke the SAM program, specifying the hostname of the local machine as local\_hostname. The SAM graphical user interface pops up.
+
+       # sam -display local_hostname:0
+
+1. 1. 1. 1. 1. Choose the Kernel Configuration icon, then the Drivers icon. From the list of drivers, select afs.
+
+1. 1. 1. 1. 1. Open the pull-down Actions menu and choose the Add Driver to Kernel option.
+
+1. 1. 1. 1. 1. Open the Actions menu again and choose the Create a New Kernel option.
+
+1. 1. 1. 1. 1. Confirm your choices by choosing Yes and OK when prompted by subsequent pop-up windows. The SAM program builds the kernel and reboots the system.
+
+1. 1. 1. 1. 1. Login again as the superuser root.
+
+       login: root
+       Password: root_password
+
+\* To use individual commands:
+
+1. 1. 1. 1. 1. Edit the file /stand/system, adding an entry for afs to the Subsystems section.
+
+1. 1. 1. 1. 1. Change to the /stand/build directory and issue the mk\_kernel command to build the kernel.
+
+       # cd /stand/build
+
+       # mk_kernel
+
+1. 1. 1. 1. 1. Move the new kernel to the standard location (/stand/vmunix), reboot the machine to start using it, and login again as the superuser root.
+
+       # mv /stand/build/vmunix_test /stand/vmunix
+
+       # cd /
+
+       # shutdown -r now
+
+       login: root
+       Password: root_password
diff --git a/AFSLore/BuildingAFSintotheIRIXKernel.mdwn b/AFSLore/BuildingAFSintotheIRIXKernel.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..38dbe12
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,40 @@
+Use the following instructions to build AFS modifications into the kernel on an IRIX system.
+
+1. Copy the kernel initialization file afs.sm to the local /var/sysgen/system directory, and the kernel master file afs to the local /var/sysgen/master.d directory.
+
+       # cp -p  bin/afs.sm  /var/sysgen/system
+
+       # cp -p  bin/afs  /var/sysgen/master.d
+
+1. Copy the appropriate AFS kernel library file to the local file /var/sysgen/boot/afs.a; the IPxx portion of the library file name must match the value previously returned by the uname -m command. Also choose the file appropriate to whether the machine's kernel supports NFS server functionality (NFS must be supported for the machine to act as an NFS/AFS Translator). Single- and multiprocessor machines use the same library file.
+
+If the machine's kernel supports NFS server functionality:
+
+       # cp -p   bin/libafs.IPxx.a   /var/sysgen/boot/afs.a
+
+If the machine's kernel does not support NFS server functionality:
+
+       # cp -p  bin/libafs.IPxx.nonfs.a  /var/sysgen/boot/afs.a
+
+1. Issue the chkconfig command to deactivate the afsml configuration variable.
+
+       # /etc/chkconfig -f afsml off
+
+If the machine is to function as an NFS/AFS Translator and the kernel supports NFS server functionality, activate the afsxnfs variable.
+
+       # /etc/chkconfig -f afsxnfs on
+
+1. Copy the existing kernel file, /unix, to a safe location. Compile the new kernel, which is created in the file /unix.install. It overwrites the existing /unix file when the machine reboots in the next step.
+
+       # cp /unix /unix_noafs
+
+       # autoconfig
+
+1. Reboot the machine to start using the new kernel, and login again as the superuser root.
+
+       # cd /
+
+       # shutdown -i6 -g0 -y
+
+       login: root
+       Password: root_password
diff --git a/AFSLore/ConfiguringServerVolumesonAIX.mdwn b/AFSLore/ConfiguringServerVolumesonAIX.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..d02bd83
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,19 @@
+Every AFS file server machine must have at least one partition or logical volume dedicated to storing AFS volumes. Each server partition is mounted at a directory named /vicepxx, where xx is one or two lowercase letters. The /vicepxx directories must reside in the file server machine's root directory, not in one of its subdirectories (for example, /usr/vicepa is not an acceptable directory location). For additional information, see Performing Platform-Specific Procedures.
+
+To configure server partitions on an AIX system, perform the following procedures:
+
+1. Create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). Repeat the command for each partition.
+
+       # mkdir /vicepxx
+
+1. Use the SMIT program to create a journaling file system on each partition to be configured as an AFS server partition.
+
+1. Mount each partition at one of the /vicepxx directories. Choose one of the following three methods:
+
+\* Use the SMIT program
+
+\* Use the mount -a command to mount all partitions at once
+
+\* Use the mount command on each partition in turn
+
+Also configure the partitions so that they are mounted automatically at each reboot. For more information, refer to the AIX documentation.
diff --git a/AFSLore/ConfiguringServerVolumesonDigitalUNIX.mdwn b/AFSLore/ConfiguringServerVolumesonDigitalUNIX.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..2c9d35e
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,19 @@
+Every AFS file server machine must have at least one partition or logical volume dedicated to storing AFS volumes. Each server partition is mounted at a directory named /vicepxx, where xx is one or two lowercase letters. The /vicepxx directories must reside in the file server machine's root directory, not in one of its subdirectories (for example, /usr/vicepa is not an acceptable directory location). For additional information, see Performing Platform-Specific Procedures.
+
+1. Create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). Repeat the command for each partition.
+
+       # mkdir /vicepxx
+
+1. Add a line with the following format to the file systems registry file, /etc/fstab, for each directory just created. The entry maps the directory name to the disk partition to be mounted on it.
+
+       /dev/disk /vicepxx ufs rw 0 2
+
+The following is an example for the first partition being configured.
+
+       /dev/rz3a /vicepa ufs rw 0 2
+
+1. Create a file system on each partition that is to be mounted at a /vicepxx directory. The following command is probably appropriate, but consult the Digital UNIX documentation for more information.
+
+       # newfs -v /dev/disk
+
+1. Mount each partition by issuing either the mount -a command to mount all partitions at once or the mount command to mount each partition in turn.
diff --git a/AFSLore/ConfiguringServerVolumesonHP-UX.mdwn b/AFSLore/ConfiguringServerVolumesonHP-UX.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..06c1220
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,9 @@
+Every AFS file server machine must have at least one partition or logical volume dedicated to storing AFS volumes. Each server partition is mounted at a directory named /vicepxx, where xx is one or two lowercase letters. The /vicepxx directories must reside in the file server machine's root directory, not in one of its subdirectories (for example, /usr/vicepa is not an acceptable directory location). For additional information, see Performing Platform-Specific Procedures.
+
+1. Create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). Repeat the command for each partition.
+
+       # mkdir /vicepxx
+
+1. Use the SAM program to create a file system on each partition. For instructions, consult the HP-UX documentation.
+
+1. On some HP-UX systems that use logical volumes, the SAM program automatically mounts the partitions. If it has not, mount each partition by issuing either the mount -a command to mount all partitions at once or the mount command to mount each partition in turn.
diff --git a/AFSLore/ConfiguringServerVolumesonIRIX.mdwn b/AFSLore/ConfiguringServerVolumesonIRIX.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..6e343da
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,38 @@
+Every AFS file server machine must have at least one partition or logical volume dedicated to storing AFS volumes. Each server partition is mounted at a directory named /vicepxx, where xx is one or two lowercase letters. The /vicepxx directories must reside in the file server machine's root directory, not in one of its subdirectories (for example, /usr/vicepa is not an acceptable directory location). For additional information, see Performing Platform-Specific Procedures.
+
+AFS supports use of both EFS and XFS partitions for housing AFS volumes. SGI encourages use of XFS partitions.
+
+1. Create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). Repeat the command for each partition.
+
+       # mkdir /vicepxx
+
+1. Add a line with the following format to the file systems registry file, /etc/fstab, for each partition (or logical volume created with the XLV volume manager) to be mounted on one of the directories created in the previous step.
+
+For an XFS partition or logical volume:
+
+       /dev/dsk/disk  /vicepxx  xfs  rw,raw=/dev/rdsk/disk  0  0
+
+For an EFS partition:
+
+       /dev/dsk/disk  /vicepxx  efs  rw,raw=/dev/rdsk/disk  0  0
+
+The following are examples of an entry for each file system type:
+
+       /dev/dsk/dks0d2s6 /vicepa  xfs rw,raw=/dev/rdsk/dks0d2s6  0 0
+       /dev/dsk/dks0d3s1 /vicepb  efs rw,raw=/dev/rdsk/dks0d3s1  0 0
+
+1. Create a file system on each partition that is to be mounted on a /vicepxx directory. The following commands are probably appropriate, but consult the IRIX documentation for more information. In both cases, raw\_device is a raw device name like /dev/rdsk/dks0d0s0 for a single disk partition or /dev/rxlv/xlv0 for a logical volume.
+
+For XFS file systems, include the indicated options to configure the partition or logical volume with inodes large enough to accommodate AFS-specific information:
+
+       # mkfs -t xfs -i size=512 -l size=4000b raw_device
+
+For EFS file systems:
+
+       # mkfs -t efs raw_device
+
+1. Mount each partition by issuing either the mount -a command to mount all partitions at once or the mount command to mount each partition in turn.
+
+1. (Optional) If you have configured partitions or logical volumes to use XFS, issue the following command to verify that the inodes are configured properly (are large enough to accommodate AFS-specific information). If the configuration is correct, the command returns no output. Otherwise, it specifies the command to run in order to configure each partition or logical volume properly.
+
+       # /usr/afs/bin/xfs_size_check
diff --git a/AFSLore/ConfiguringServerVolumesonLinux.mdwn b/AFSLore/ConfiguringServerVolumesonLinux.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..3633fa2
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,19 @@
+Every AFS file server machine must have at least one partition or logical volume dedicated to storing AFS volumes. Each server partition is mounted at a directory named /vicepxx, where xx is one or two lowercase letters. The /vicepxx directories must reside in the file server machine's root directory, not in one of its subdirectories (for example, /usr/vicepa is not an acceptable directory location). For additional information, see Performing Platform-Specific Procedures.
+
+1. Create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). Repeat the command for each partition.
+
+       # mkdir /vicepxx
+
+1. Add a line with the following format to the file systems registry file, /etc/fstab, for each directory just created. The entry maps the directory name to the disk partition to be mounted on it.
+
+       /dev/disk  /vicepxx  ext2  defaults  0  2
+
+The following is an example for the first partition being configured.
+
+       /dev/sda8 /vicepa ext2 defaults 0 2
+
+1. Create a file system on each partition that is to be mounted at a /vicepxx directory. The following command is probably appropriate, but consult the Linux documentation for more information.
+
+       # mkfs -v /dev/disk
+
+1. Mount each partition by issuing either the mount -a command to mount all partitions at once or the mount command to mount each partition in turn.
diff --git a/AFSLore/ConfiguringServerVolumesonSolaris.mdwn b/AFSLore/ConfiguringServerVolumesonSolaris.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..8db8319
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,21 @@
+Every AFS file server machine must have at least one partition or logical volume dedicated to storing AFS volumes. Each server partition is mounted at a directory named /vicepxx, where xx is one or two lowercase letters. The /vicepxx directories must reside in the file server machine's root directory, not in one of its subdirectories (for example, /usr/vicepa is not an acceptable directory location). For additional information, see Performing Platform-Specific Procedures.
+
+If this AFS server it is not going to be a file server you can skip this step.
+
+Create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). Repeat this command for each partition.
+
+       # mkdir /vicepxx
+
+Add a line with the following format to the file systems registry file, /etc/vfstab, for each partition to be mounted on a directory created in the previous step. Note the value afs in the fourth field, which tells Solaris to use the AFS-modified fsck program on this partition.
+
+       /dev/dsk/disk   /dev/rdsk/disk   /vicepxx   afs   boot_order  yes  -
+
+The following is an example for the first partition being configured.
+
+       /dev/dsk/c0t6d0s1 /dev/rdsk/c0t6d0s1 /vicepa afs 3 yes -
+
+Create a file system on each partition that is to be mounted at a /vicepxx directory. The following command is probably appropriate, but consult the Solaris documentation for more information.
+
+       # newfs -v /dev/rdsk/disk
+
+Issue the mountall command to mount all partitions at once.
diff --git a/AFSLore/ConfiguringtheAFS-modifiedfsckProgramonHP-UXSystems.mdwn b/AFSLore/ConfiguringtheAFS-modifiedfsckProgramonHP-UXSystems.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..1266b4c
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,38 @@
+In this section, you make modifications to guarantee that the appropriate fsck program runs on AFS server partitions. The fsck program provided with the operating system must never run on AFS server partitions. Because it does not recognize the structures that the File Server uses to organize volume data, it removes all of the data. To repeat:
+
+Never run the standard fsck program on AFS server partitions. It discards AFS volumes.
+
+On HP-UX systems, there are several configuration files to install in addition to the AFS-modified fsck program (the vfsck binary).
+
+1. Create the command configuration file /sbin/lib/mfsconfig.d/afs. Use a text editor to place the indicated two lines in it:
+
+       format_revision 1
+       fsck            0        m,P,p,d,f,b:c:y,n,Y,N,q,
+
+1. Create and change directory to an AFS-specific command directory called /sbin/fs/afs.
+
+       # mkdir /sbin/fs/afs
+
+       # cd  /sbin/fs/afs
+
+1. Copy the AFS-modified version of the fsck program (the vfsck binary) and related files from the distribution directory to the new AFS-specific command directory.
+
+       # cp -p /cdrom/hp_ux110/root.server/etc/*  .
+
+1. Change the vfsck binary's name to fsck and set the mode bits appropriately on all of the files in the /sbin/fs/afs directory.
+
+       # mv  vfsck  fsck
+
+       # chmod  755  *
+
+1. Edit the /etc/fstab file, changing the file system type for each AFS server partition from hfs to afs. This ensures that the AFS-modified fsck program runs on the appropriate partitions.
+
+The sixth line in the following example of an edited file shows an AFS server partition, /vicepa.
+
+       /dev/vg00/lvol1 / hfs defaults 0 1
+       /dev/vg00/lvol4 /opt hfs defaults 0 2
+       /dev/vg00/lvol5 /tmp hfs defaults 0 2
+       /dev/vg00/lvol6 /usr hfs defaults 0 2
+       /dev/vg00/lvol8 /var hfs defaults 0 2
+       /dev/vg00/lvol9 /vicepa afs defaults 0 2
+       /dev/vg00/lvol7 /usr/vice/cache hfs defaults 0 2
diff --git a/AFSLore/ConfiguringtheAFS-modifiedfsckProgramonSolarisSystems.mdwn b/AFSLore/ConfiguringtheAFS-modifiedfsckProgramonSolarisSystems.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..f1b581a
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,114 @@
+In this section, you make modifications to guarantee that the appropriate fsck program runs on AFS server partitions. The fsck program provided with the operating system must never run on AFS server partitions. Because it does not recognize the structures that the File Server uses to organize volume data, it removes all of the data. To repeat:
+
+Never run the standard fsck program on AFS server partitions. It discards AFS volumes.
+
+1. Create the /usr/lib/fs/afs directory to house the AFS-modified fsck program and related files.
+
+       # mkdir /usr/lib/fs/afs
+
+       # cd /usr/lib/fs/afs
+
+       2. Copy the vfsck binary to the newly created directory, changing the name as you do so.
+
+       # cp  /cdrom/sysname/dest/root.server/etc/vfsck  fsck
+
+1. Working in the /usr/lib/fs/afs directory, create the following links to Solaris libraries:
+
+       # ln -s /usr/lib/fs/ufs/clri
+       # ln -s /usr/lib/fs/ufs/df
+       # ln -s /usr/lib/fs/ufs/edquota
+       # ln -s /usr/lib/fs/ufs/ff
+       # ln -s /usr/lib/fs/ufs/fsdb
+       # ln -s /usr/lib/fs/ufs/fsirand
+       # ln -s /usr/lib/fs/ufs/fstyp
+       # ln -s /usr/lib/fs/ufs/labelit
+       # ln -s /usr/lib/fs/ufs/lockfs
+       # ln -s /usr/lib/fs/ufs/mkfs
+       # ln -s /usr/lib/fs/ufs/mount
+       # ln -s /usr/lib/fs/ufs/ncheck
+       # ln -s /usr/lib/fs/ufs/newfs
+       # ln -s /usr/lib/fs/ufs/quot
+       # ln -s /usr/lib/fs/ufs/quota
+       # ln -s /usr/lib/fs/ufs/quotaoff
+       # ln -s /usr/lib/fs/ufs/quotaon
+       # ln -s /usr/lib/fs/ufs/repquota
+       # ln -s /usr/lib/fs/ufs/tunefs
+       # ln -s /usr/lib/fs/ufs/ufsdump
+       # ln -s /usr/lib/fs/ufs/ufsrestore
+       # ln -s /usr/lib/fs/ufs/volcopy
+
+1. Append the following line to the end of the file /etc/dfs/fstypes.
+
+       afs AFS Utilities
+
+1. Edit the /sbin/mountall file, making two changes.
+
+\* Add an entry for AFS to the case statement for option 2, so that it reads as follows:
+
+       case "$2" in
+       ufs)    foptions="-o p"
+               ;;
+       afs)    foptions="-o p"
+               ;;
+       s5)     foptions="-y -t /var/tmp/tmp$$ -D"
+               ;;
+       *)      foptions="-y"
+               ;;
+
+### <a name="Solaris 6"></a> Solaris 6
+
+\* Edit the file so that all AFS and UFS partitions are checked in parallel. Replace the following section of code:
+
+       # For  fsck purposes, we make a distinction between ufs and
+       # other file systems
+       #
+       if [ "$fstype" = "ufs" ]; then
+            ufs_fscklist="$ufs_fscklist $fsckdev"
+            saveentry $fstype "$OPTIONS" $special $mountp
+            continue
+       fi
+
+with the following section of code:
+
+       # For fsck purposes, we make a distinction between ufs/afs
+       # and other file systems.
+       #
+       if [ "$fstype" = "ufs" -o "$fstype" = "afs" ]; then
+            ufs_fscklist="$ufs_fscklist $fsckdev"
+            saveentry $fstype "$OPTIONS" $special $mountp
+            continue
+       fi
+
+### <a name="Solaris 9"></a> Solaris 9
+
+\* Edit the file so that all AFS and UFS partitions are checked in parallel.
+
+You must copy /usr/lib/fs/ufs/fsckall to /usr/lib/fs/afs/fsckall and change the word ufs to afs in file /usr/lib/fs/afs/fsckall as indicated below. This ensures that AFS fsck is called on vice partitions.
+
+1. 1. 1. Copy /usr/lib/fs/ufs/fsckall to /usr/lib/fs/afs/fsckall.
+
+    cp /usr/lib/fs/ufs/fsckall /usr/lib/fs/afs/fsckall
+
+1. 1. 1. Edit /usr/lib/fs/afs/fsckall and replace ufs with afs as indicated below.
+
+Original:
+
+    for fsckdev in $*; do
+    /usr/sbin/fsck -m -F ufs $fsckdev >/dev/null 2>&1
+
+Modified:
+
+    for fsckdev in $*; do
+    /usr/lib/fs/afs/fsck -m -F afs $fsckdev >/dev/null 2>&1
+
+Also, this section of the same file:
+
+Original:
+
+            echo "checking ufs filesystems"
+            /usr/sbin/fsck -o p $ufs_fscklist
+
+Modified:
+
+            echo "checking afs filesystems"
+            /usr/lib/fs/afs/fsck -o p $ufs_fscklist
diff --git a/AFSLore/ConfiguringtheCache.mdwn b/AFSLore/ConfiguringtheCache.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..900fa60
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,57 @@
+The Cache Manager uses a cache on the local disk or in machine memory to store local copies of files fetched from file server machines. As the afsd program initializes the Cache Manager, it sets basic cache configuration parameters according to definitions in the local /usr/vice/etc/cacheinfo file. The file has three fields:
+
+1. The first field names the local directory on which to mount the AFS filespace. The conventional location is the /afs directory.
+
+1. The second field defines the local disk directory to use for the disk cache. The conventional location is the /usr/vice/cache directory, but you can specify an alternate directory if another partition has more space available. There must always be a value in this field, but the Cache Manager ignores it if the machine uses a memory cache.
+
+1. The third field specifies the number of kilobyte (1024 byte) blocks to allocate for the cache.
+
+The values you define must meet the following requirements.
+
+\* On a machine using a disk cache, the Cache Manager expects always to be able to use the amount of space specified in the third field. Failure to meet this requirement can cause serious problems, some of which can be repaired only by rebooting. You must prevent non-AFS processes from filling up the cache partition. The simplest way is to devote a partition to the cache exclusively.
+
+\* The amount of space available in memory or on the partition housing the disk cache directory imposes an absolute limit on cache size.
+
+\* The maximum supported cache size can vary in each AFS release; see the IBM AFS Release Notes for the current version.
+
+\* For a disk cache, you cannot specify a value in the third field that exceeds 95% of the space available on the partition mounted at the directory named in the second field. If you violate this restriction, the afsd program exits without starting the Cache Manager and prints an appropriate message on the standard output stream. A value of 90% is more appropriate on most machines. Some operating systems (such as AIX) do not automatically reserve some space to prevent the partition from filling completely; for them, a smaller value (say, 80% to 85% of the space available) is more appropriate.
+
+\* For a memory cache, you must leave enough memory for other processes and applications to run. If you try to allocate more memory than is actually available, the afsd program exits without initializing the Cache Manager and produces the following message on the standard output stream.
+
+       afsd: memCache allocation failure at number KB
+
+The number value is how many kilobytes were allocated just before the failure, and so indicates the approximate amount of memory available.
+
+Within these hard limits, the factors that determine appropriate cache size include the number of users working on the machine, the size of the files with which they work, and (for a memory cache) the number of processes that run on the machine. The higher the demand from these factors, the larger the cache needs to be to maintain good performance.
+
+Disk caches smaller than 10 MB do not generally perform well. Machines serving multiple users usually perform better with a cache of at least 60 to 70 MB. The point at which enlarging the cache further does not really improve performance depends on the factors mentioned previously and is difficult to predict.
+
+Memory caches smaller than 1 MB are nonfunctional, and the performance of caches smaller than 5 MB is usually unsatisfactory. Suitable upper limits are similar to those for disk caches but are probably determined more by the demands on memory from other sources on the machine (number of users and processes). Machines running only a few processes possibly can use a smaller memory cache.
+
+## <a name="Configuring a Disk Cache"></a> Configuring a Disk Cache
+
+Note: Not all file system types that an operating system supports are necessarily supported for use as the cache partition. For possible restrictions, see the IBM AFS Release Notes.
+
+To configure the disk cache, perform the following procedures:
+
+1. Create the local directory to use for caching. The following instruction shows the conventional location, /usr/vice/cache. If you are devoting a partition exclusively to caching, as recommended, you must also configure it, make a file system on it, and mount it at the directory created in this step.
+
+       # mkdir /usr/vice/cache
+
+1. Create the cacheinfo file to define the configuration parameters discussed previously. The following instruction shows the standard mount location, /afs, and the standard cache location, /usr/vice/cache.
+
+       # echo "/afs:/usr/vice/cache:#blocks" > /usr/vice/etc/cacheinfo
+
+The following example defines the disk cache size as 50,000 KB:
+
+       # echo "/afs:/usr/vice/cache:50000" > /usr/vice/etc/cacheinfo
+
+## <a name="Configuring a Memory Cache"></a> Configuring a Memory Cache
+
+To configure a memory cache, create the cacheinfo file to define the configuration parameters discussed previously. The following instruction shows the standard mount location, /afs, and the standard cache location, /usr/vice/cache (though the exact value of the latter is irrelevant for a memory cache).
+
+       # echo "/afs:/usr/vice/cache:#blocks" > /usr/vice/etc/cacheinfo
+
+The following example allocates 25,000 KB of memory for the cache.
+
+       # echo "/afs:/usr/vice/cache:25000" > /usr/vice/etc/cacheinfo
diff --git a/AFSLore/ConfiguringtheCacheManager.mdwn b/AFSLore/ConfiguringtheCacheManager.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..528ad58
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,68 @@
+By convention, the Cache Manager mounts the AFS filespace on the local /afs directory. In this section you create that directory.
+
+The afsd program sets several cache configuration parameters as it initializes the Cache Manager, and starts daemons that improve performance. You can use the afsd command's arguments to override the parameters' default values and to change the number of some of the daemons. Depending on the machine's cache size, its amount of RAM, and how many people work on it, you can sometimes improve Cache Manager performance by overriding the default values. For a discussion of all of the afsd command's arguments, see its reference page in the IBM AFS Administration Reference.
+
+The afsd command line in the AFS initialization script on each system type includes an OPTIONS variable. You can use it to set nondefault values for the command's arguments, in one of the following ways:
+
+\* You can create an afsd options file that sets values for arguments to the afsd command. If the file exists, its contents are automatically substituted for the OPTIONS variable in the AFS initialization script. The AFS distribution for some system types includes an options file; on other system types, you must create it.
+
+You use two variables in the AFS initialization script to specify the path to the options file: CONFIG and AFSDOPT. On system types that define a conventional directory for configuration files, the CONFIG variable indicates it by default; otherwise, the variable indicates an appropriate location.
+
+List the desired afsd options on a single line in the options file, separating each option with one or more spaces. The following example sets the -stat argument to 2500, the -daemons argument to 4, and the -volumes argument to 100.
+
+       -stat 2500 -daemons 4 -volumes 100
+
+\* On a machine that uses a disk cache, you can set the OPTIONS variable in the AFS initialization script to one of $SMALL, $MEDIUM, or $LARGE. The AFS initialization script uses one of these settings if the afsd options file named by the AFSDOPT variable does not exist. In the script as distributed, the OPTIONS variable is set to the value $MEDIUM.
+
+<dl>
+  <dd>
+    <dl>
+      <dt> Note</dt>
+      <dd> Do not set the OPTIONS variable to $SMALL, $MEDIUM, or $LARGE on a machine that uses a memory cache. The arguments it sets are appropriate only on a machine that uses a disk cache. </dd>
+    </dl>
+  </dd>
+</dl>
+
+The script (or on some system types the afsd options file named by the AFSDOPT variable) defines a value for each of SMALL, MEDIUM, and LARGE that sets afsd command arguments appropriately for client machines of different sizes:
+
+              o SMALL is suitable for a small machine that serves one or two users and has approximately 8 MB of RAM and a 20-MB cache
+
+              o MEDIUM is suitable for a medium-sized machine that serves two to six users and has 16 MB of RAM and a 40-MB cache
+
+              o LARGE is suitable for a large machine that serves five to ten users and has 32 MB of RAM and a 100-MB cache
+
+\* You can choose not to create an afsd options file and to set the OPTIONS variable in the initialization script to a null value rather than to the default $MEDIUM value. You can then either set arguments directly on the afsd command line in the script, or set no arguments (and so accept default values for all Cache Manager parameters).
+
+1. Create the local directory on which to mount the AFS filespace, by convention /afs. If the directory already exists, verify that it is empty.
+
+       # mkdir /afs
+
+1. On AIX systems, add the following line to the /etc/vfs file. It enables AIX to unmount AFS correctly during shutdown.
+
+       afs     4     none     none
+
+1. On Linux systems, copy the afsd options file from the /usr/vice/etc directory to the /etc/sysconfig directory, removing the .conf extension as you do so.
+
+       # cp /usr/vice/etc/afs.conf /etc/sysconfig/afs
+
+1. Edit the machine's AFS initialization script or afsd options file to set appropriate values for afsd command parameters. The script resides in the indicated location on each system type:
+
+- On AIX systems, /etc/rc.afs
+
+- On Digital UNIX systems, /sbin/init.d/afs
+
+- On HP-UX systems, /sbin/init.d/afs
+
+- On IRIX systems, /etc/init.d/afs
+
+- On Linux systems, /etc/sysconfig/afs (the afsd options file)
+
+- On Solaris systems, /etc/init.d/afs
+
+Use one of the methods described in the introduction to this section to add the following flags to the afsd command line. If you intend for the machine to remain an AFS client, also set any performance-related arguments you wish.
+
+\* Add the -nosettime flag, because this is a file server machine that is also a client. The flag prevents the machine from picking a file server machine in the cell as its source for the correct time, which client machines normally do. File server machines instead use NTPD (as controlled by the runntp process) or another protocol to synchronize their clocks.
+
+\* Add the -memcache flag if the machine is to use a memory cache.
+
+\* Add the -verbose flag to display a trace of the Cache Manager's initialization on the standard output stream.
diff --git a/AFSLore/ConfirmCacheManagerInitialization.mdwn b/AFSLore/ConfirmCacheManagerInitialization.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..b1eafd4
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,26 @@
+Wait for the message that confirms that Cache Manager initialization is complete.
+
+On machines that use a disk cache, it can take a while to initialize the Cache Manager for the first time, because the afsd program must create all of the Vn files in the cache directory. Subsequent Cache Manager initializations do not take nearly as long, because the Vn files already exist.
+
+As a basic test of correct AFS functioning, issue the klog command to authenticate as the admin user. Provide the password (admin\_passwd) you defined in Initializing Cell Security.
+
+       # /usr/afs/bin/klog admin
+       Password:  admin_passwd
+
+Issue the tokens command to verify that the klog command worked correctly. If it did, the output looks similar to the following example for the abc.com cell, where admin's AFS UID is 1. If the output does not seem correct, resolve the problem. Changes to the AFS initialization script are possibly necessary. The AFS Product Support group can provide assistance as necessary.
+
+       # /usr/afs/bin/tokens
+       Tokens held by the Cache Manager:
+
+       User's (AFS ID 1) tokens for afs@abc.com [Expires May 22 11:52]
+           --End of list--
+
+Issue the bos status command to verify that the output for each process reads Currently running normally.
+
+       # /usr/afs/bin/bos status <machine name>
+
+Change directory to the local file system root (/) and issue the fs checkvolumes command.
+
+       # cd /
+
+       # /usr/afs/bin/fs checkvolumes
diff --git a/AFSLore/CreatingtheClientCellServDBFile.mdwn b/AFSLore/CreatingtheClientCellServDBFile.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..f3aafef
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,46 @@
+The /usr/vice/etc/CellServDB file on a client machine's local disk lists the database server machines for each cell that the local Cache Manager can contact. If there is no entry in the file for a cell, or if the list of database server machines is wrong, then users working on this machine cannot access the cell. The chapter in the IBM AFS Administration Guide about administering client machines explains how to maintain the file after creating it.
+
+As the afsd program initializes the Cache Manager, it copies the contents of the [[CellServDB]] file into kernel memory. The Cache Manager always consults the list in kernel memory rather than the [[CellServDB]] file itself. Between reboots of the machine, you can use the fs newcell command to update the list in kernel memory directly; see the chapter in the IBM AFS Administration Guide about administering client machines.
+
+The AFS distribution includes the file [[CellServDB]].sample, and you have already copied it to the /usr/vice/etc directory. It includes an entry for all AFS cells that agreed to share their database server machine information at the time your AFS CD-ROM was created. The AFS Product Support group also maintains a copy of the file, updating it as necessary. If you are interested in participating in the global AFS namespace, it is a good policy to consult the file occasionally for updates. Ask the AFS Product Support group for a pointer to its location.
+
+The [[CellServDB]].sample file can be a good basis for the client [[CellServDB]] file, because all of the entries in it use the correct format. You can add or remove cell entries as you see fit. Later (in Enabling Access to Foreign Cells) you perform additional steps that enable the Cache Manager actually to reach the cells.
+
+In this section, you add an entry for the local cell to the local [[CellServDB]] file. The current working directory is still /usr/vice/etc.
+
+1. Remove the symbolic link created in Starting the BOS Server and rename the [[CellServDB]].sample file to [[CellServDB]].
+
+       # rm CellServDB
+
+       # mv CellServDB.sample CellServDB
+
+1. Add an entry for the local cell to the [[CellServDB]] file. One easy method is to use the cat command to append the contents of the server /usr/afs/etc/CellServDB file to the client version.
+
+        # cat  /usr/afs/etc/CellServDB >>  CellServDB
+
+Then open the file in a text editor to verify that there are no blank lines, and that all entries have the required format, which is described just following. The ordering of cells is not significant, but it can be convenient to have the client machine's home cell at the top; move it there now if you wish.
+
+\* The first line of a cell's entry has the following format:
+
+       >cell_name      #organization
+
+where cell\_name is the cell's complete Internet domain name (for example, abc.com) and organization is an optional field that follows any number of spaces and the number sign (#). By convention it names the organization to which the cell corresponds (for example, the ABC Corporation).
+
+\* After the first line comes a separate line for each database server machine. Each line has the following format:
+
+       IP_address   #machine_name
+
+where IP\_address is the machine's IP address in dotted decimal format (for example, 192.12.105.3). Following any number of spaces and the number sign (#) is machine\_name, the machine's fully-qualified hostname (for example, db1.abc.com). In this case, the number sign does not indicate a comment; machine\_name is a required field.
+
+1. If the file includes cells that you do not wish users of this machine to access, remove their entries.
+
+The following example shows entries for two cells, each of which has three database server machines:
+
+       >abc.com       #ABC Corporation (home cell)
+       192.12.105.3      #db1.abc.com
+       192.12.105.4      #db2.abc.com
+       192.12.105.55     #db3.abc.com
+       >stateu.edu    #State University cell
+       138.255.68.93     #serverA.stateu.edu
+       138.255.68.72     #serverB.stateu.edu
+       138.255.33.154    #serverC.stateu.edu
diff --git a/AFSLore/EnablingAFSLoginonAIXSystems.mdwn b/AFSLore/EnablingAFSLoginonAIXSystems.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..170aea8
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,59 @@
+Follow the instructions in this section to incorporate AFS modifications into the AIX secondary authentication system.
+
+1. Issue the ls command to verify that the afs\_dynamic\_auth and afs\_dynamic\_kerbauth programs are installed in the local /usr/vice/etc directory.
+
+       # ls /usr/vice/etc
+
+If the files do not exist, mount the AFS CD-ROM for AIX (if it is not already), change directory as indicated, and copy them.
+
+       # cd /cdrom/rs_aix42/root.client/usr/vice/etc
+
+       # cp  -p  afs_dynamic*  /usr/vice/etc
+
+1. Edit the local /etc/security/user file, making changes to the indicated stanzas:
+
+\* In the default stanza, set the registry attribute to DCE (not to AFS), as follows:
+
+       registry = DCE
+
+\* In the default stanza, set the SYSTEM attribute as indicated.
+
+If the machine is an AFS client only, set the following value:
+
+       SYSTEM = "AFS OR (AFS[UNAVAIL] AND compat[SUCCESS])"
+
+If the machine is both an AFS and a DCE client, set the following value (it must appear on a single line in the file):
+
+       SYSTEM = "DCE OR DCE[UNAVAIL] OR AFS OR (AFS[UNAVAIL]  \
+           AND compat[SUCCESS])"
+
+\* In the root stanza, set the registry attribute as follows. It enables the local superuser root to log into the local file system only, based on the password listed in the local password file.
+
+       root:
+             registry = files
+
+1. Edit the local /etc/security/login.cfg file, creating or editing the indicated stanzas:
+
+\* In the DCE stanza, set the program attribute as follows.
+
+If you use the AFS Authentication Server (kaserver process):
+
+       DCE:
+            program = /usr/vice/etc/afs_dynamic_auth
+
+If you use a Kerberos implementation of AFS authentication:
+
+       DCE:
+            program = /usr/vice/etc/afs_dynamic_kerbauth
+
+\* In the AFS stanza, set the program attribute as follows.
+
+If you use the AFS Authentication Server (kaserver process):
+
+       AFS:
+            program = /usr/vice/etc/afs_dynamic_auth
+
+If you use a Kerberos implementation of AFS authentication:
+
+       AFS:
+            program = /usr/vice/etc/afs_dynamic_kerbauth
diff --git a/AFSLore/EnablingAFSLoginonDigitalUNIXSystems.mdwn b/AFSLore/EnablingAFSLoginonDigitalUNIXSystems.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..a951b1f
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,21 @@
+## <a name="Enabling AFS Login on Digital UN"></a> Enabling AFS Login on Digital UNIX Systems
+
+On Digital UNIX systems, the AFS initialization script automatically incorporates the AFS authentication library file into the Security Integration Architecture (SIA) matrix on the machine, so that users with AFS accounts obtain a token at login. In this section you copy the library file to the appropriate location.
+
+For more information on SIA, see the Digital UNIX reference page for matrix.conf, or consult the section on security in your Digital UNIX documentation. Note: If the machine runs both the DCE and AFS client software, AFS must start after DCE. Consult the AFS initialization script for suggested symbolic links to create for correct ordering. Also, the system startup script order must initialize SIA before any long-running process that uses authentication.
+
+Perform the following steps to enable AFS login.
+
+1. Mount the AFS CD-ROM for Digital UNIX on the local /cdrom directory, if it is not already. Change directory as indicated.
+
+       # cd /cdrom/alpha_dux40/lib/afs
+
+1. Copy the appropriate AFS authentication library file to the local /usr/shlib directory.
+
+If you use the AFS Authentication Server (kaserver process) in the cell:
+
+       # cp  libafssiad.so  /usr/shlib
+
+If you use a Kerberos implementation of AFS authentication, rename the library file as you copy it:
+
+       # cp  libafssiad.krb.so  /usr/shlib/libafssiad.so
diff --git a/AFSLore/EnablingAFSLoginonHP-UXSystems.mdwn b/AFSLore/EnablingAFSLoginonHP-UXSystems.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..e1194ff
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,71 @@
+At this point you incorporate AFS into the operating system's Pluggable Authentication Module (PAM) scheme. PAM integrates all authentication mechanisms on the machine, including login, to provide the security infrastructure for authenticated access to and from the machine.
+
+Explaining PAM is beyond the scope of this document. It is assumed that you understand the syntax and meanings of settings in the PAM configuration file (for example, how the other entry works, the effect of marking an entry as required, optional, or sufficient, and so on).
+
+The following instructions explain how to alter the entries in the PAM configuration file for each service for which you wish to use AFS authentication. Other configurations possibly also work, but the instructions specify the recommended and tested configuration. Note: The instructions specify that you mark each entry as optional. However, marking some modules as optional can mean that they grant access to the corresponding service even when the user does not meet all of the module's requirements. In some operating system revisions, for example, if you mark as optional the module that controls login via a dial-up connection, it allows users to login without providing a password. See the IBM AFS Release Notes for a discussion of any limitations that apply to this operating system.
+
+Also, with some operating system versions you must install patches for PAM to interact correctly with certain authentication programs. For details, see the IBM AFS Release Notes.
+
+The recommended AFS-related entries in the PAM configuration file make use of one or more of the following three attributes.
+
+    try_first_pass
+
+This is a standard PAM attribute that can be included on entries after the first one for a service; it directs the module to use the password that was provided to the first module. For the AFS module, it means that AFS authentication succeeds if the password provided to the module listed first is the user's correct AFS password. For further discussion of this attribute and its alternatives, see the operating system's PAM documentation.
+
+    ignore_root
+
+This attribute, specific to the AFS PAM module, directs it to ignore not only the local superuser root, but also any user with UID 0 (zero).
+
+    setenv_password_expires
+
+This attribute, specific to the AFS PAM module, sets the environment variable PASSWORD\_EXPIRES to the expiration date of the user's AFS password, which is recorded in the Authentication Database.
+
+Perform the following steps to enable AFS login.
+
+1. Mount the AFS CD-ROM for HP-UX on the /cdrom directory, if it is not already. Then change directory as indicated.
+
+       # cd /usr/lib/security
+
+1. Copy the AFS authentication library file to the /usr/lib/security directory. Then create a symbolic link to it whose name does not mention the version. Omitting the version eliminates the need to edit the PAM configuration file if you later update the library file.
+
+If you use the AFS Authentication Server (kaserver process) in the cell:
+
+       # cp /cdrom/hp_ux110/lib/pam_afs.so.1  .
+
+       # ln -s  pam_afs.so.1  pam_afs.so
+
+If you use a Kerberos implementation of AFS authentication:
+
+       # cp /cdrom/hp_ux110/lib/pam_afs.krb.so.1   .
+
+       # ln -s pam_afs.krb.so.1 pam_afs.so
+
+1. Edit the Authentication management section of the HP-UX PAM configuration file, /etc/pam.conf by convention. The entries in this section have the value auth in their second field.
+
+First edit the standard entries, which refer to the HP-UX PAM module (usually, the file /usr/lib/security/libpam\_unix.1) in their fourth field. For each service for which you want to use AFS authentication, edit the third field of its entry to read optional. The pam.conf file in the HP-UX distribution usually includes standard entries for the login and ftp services, for instance.
+
+If there are services for which you want to use AFS authentication, but for which the pam.conf file does not already include a standard entry, you must create that entry and place the value optional in its third field. For instance, the HP-UX pam.conf file does not usually include standard entries for the remsh or telnet services.
+
+Then create an AFS-related entry for each service, placing it immediately below the standard entry. The following example shows what the Authentication Management section looks like after you have you edited or created entries for the services mentioned previously. Note that the example AFS entries appear on two lines only for legibility.
+
+       login   auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/libpam_unix.1
+       login   auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_afs.so      \
+             try_first_pass  ignore_root  setenv_password_expires
+       ftp     auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/libpam_unix.1
+       ftp     auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_afs.so      \
+             try_first_pass  ignore_root
+       remsh   auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/libpam_unix.1
+       remsh   auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_afs.so      \
+             try_first_pass  ignore_root
+       telnet  auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/libpam_unix.1
+       telnet  auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_afs.so      \
+             try_first_pass  ignore_root  setenv_password_expires
+
+1. If you use the Common Desktop Environment (CDE) on the machine and want users to obtain an AFS token as they log in, also add or edit the following four entries in the Authentication management section. Note that the AFS-related entries appear on two lines here only for legibility.
+
+       dtlogin   auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/libpam_unix.1
+       dtlogin   auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_afs.so     \
+             try_first_pass  ignore_root
+       dtaction  auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/libpam_unix.1
+       dtaction  auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_afs.so     \
+             try_first_pass  ignore_root
diff --git a/AFSLore/EnablingAFSLoginonIRIXSystems.mdwn b/AFSLore/EnablingAFSLoginonIRIXSystems.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..a1681c6
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,11 @@
+The standard IRIX command-line login program and the graphical xdm login program both automatically grant an AFS token when AFS is incorporated into the machine's kernel. However, some IRIX distributions use another login utility by default, and it does not necessarily incorporate the required AFS modifications. If that is the case, you must disable the default utility if you want AFS users to obtain AFS tokens at login. For further discussion, see the IBM AFS Release Notes.
+
+If you configure the machine to use an AFS-modified login utility, then the afsauthlib.so and afskauthlib.so files (included in the AFS distribution) must reside in the /usr/vice/etc directory. Issue the ls command to verify.
+
+       # ls /usr/vice/etc
+
+If the files do not exist, mount the AFS CD-ROM for IRIX (if it is not already), change directory as indicated, and copy them.
+
+       # cd /cdrom/sgi_65/root.client/usr/vice/etc
+
+       # cp  -p  *authlib*  /usr/vice/etc
diff --git a/AFSLore/EnablingAFSLoginonLinuxSystems.mdwn b/AFSLore/EnablingAFSLoginonLinuxSystems.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..042f112
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,192 @@
+At this point you incorporate AFS into the operating system's Pluggable Authentication Module (PAM) scheme. PAM integrates all authentication mechanisms on the machine, including login, to provide the security infrastructure for authenticated access to and from the machine.
+
+Explaining PAM is beyond the scope of this document. It is assumed that you understand the syntax and meanings of settings in the PAM configuration file (for example, how the other entry works, the effect of marking an entry as required, optional, or sufficient, and so on).
+
+The following instructions explain how to alter the entries in the PAM configuration file for each service for which you wish to use AFS authentication. Other configurations possibly also work, but the instructions specify the recommended and tested configuration.
+
+The recommended AFS-related entries in the PAM configuration file make use of one or more of the following three attributes.
+
+    try_first_pass
+
+This is a standard PAM attribute that can be included on entries after the first one for a service; it directs the module to use the password that was provided to the first module. For the AFS module, it means that AFS authentication succeeds if the password provided to the module listed first is the user's correct AFS password. For further discussion of this attribute and its alternatives, see the operating system's PAM documentation.
+
+    ignore_root
+
+This attribute, specific to the AFS PAM module, directs it to ignore not only the local superuser root, but also any user with UID 0 (zero).
+
+    ignore_uid uid
+
+This option is an extension of the "ignore\_root" switch. The additional parameter is a limit. Users with a uid up to the given parameter are ignored by pam\_afs.so. Thus, a system administrator still has the opportunity to add local user accounts to his system by choosing between "low" and "high" user ids. An example /etc/passwd file for "ignore\_uid 100" may have entries like these:
+
+            .
+            .
+    afsuserone:x:99:100::/afs/afscell/u/afsuserone:/bin/bash
+    afsusertwo:x:100:100::/afs/afscell/u/afsusertwo:/bin/bash
+    localuserone:x:101:100::/home/localuserone:/bin/bash
+    localusertwo:x:102:100::/home/localusertwo:/bin/bash
+            .
+            .
+
+AFS accounts should be locked in the file /etc/shadow like this:
+
+            .
+            .
+    afsuserone:!!:11500:0:99999:7:::
+    afsusertwo:!!:11500:0:99999:7:::
+    localuserone:<thelocaluserone'skey>:11500:0:99999:7:::
+    localusertwo:<thelocalusertwo'skey>:11500:0:99999:7:::
+            .
+            .
+
+There is no need to store a local key in this file since the AFS password is sent and verfied at the AFS cell server!
+
+    setenv_password_expires
+
+This attribute, specific to the AFS PAM module, sets the environment variable PASSWORD\_EXPIRES to the expiration date of the user's AFS password, which is recorded in the Authentication Database.
+
+    set_token
+
+Some applications don't call pam\_setcred() in order to retrieve the appropriate credentials (here the AFS token) for their session. This switch sets the credentials already in pam\_sm\_authenticate() obsoleting a call to pam\_setcred(). Caution: Don't use this switch for applications which do call pam\_setcred()! One example for an application not calling pam\_setcred() are older versions of the samba server. Nevertheless, using applications with working pam session management is recommended as this setup conforms better with the PAM definitions.
+
+    refresh_token
+
+This options is identical to "set\_token" except that no new PAG is generated. This is necessary to handle processes like xlock or xscreensaver. It is not enough to give the screen and the keyboard free for the user who reactivated his screen typing in the correct AFS password, but one may also need fresh tokens with full livetime in order to work on, and the new token must be refreshed in the already existing PAG for the processes that have been started. This is achieved using this option.
+
+    use_klog
+
+Activating this switch the authentication is done by calling the external program "klog". One program requiring this is for example kdm of KDE 2.x.
+
+    dont_fork
+
+Usually, the password verification and the establishment of the token is performed in a sub process. Using this option pam\_afs does not fork and performs all actions in a single process. Only use this options in case you notice serious problems caused by the sub process. This option has been developed in respect to the "mod\_auth\_pam"-project (see also mod\_auth\_pam). The mod\_auth\_pam module enables PAM authentication for the apache http server package.
+
+Session Management
+
+    no_unlog
+
+Normally the tokens are deleted (in memory) after the session ends. Using this options the tokens are left untouched. This behaviour has been the default in pam\_afs until openafs-1.1.1!
+
+    remainlifetime sec
+
+The tokens are kept active for sec seconds before they are deleted. X display managers i.e. are used to inform the applications started in the X session before the logout and then end themselves. If the token was deleted immediately the applications would have no chance to write back their settings to i.e. the user's AFS home space. This option may help to avoid the problem.
+
+Perform the following steps to enable AFS login.
+
+1. Mount the AFS CD-ROM for Linux on the /cdrom directory, if it is not already. Then change to the directory for PAM modules, which depends on which Linux distribution you are using.
+
+If you are using a Linux distribution from Red Hat Software:
+
+       # cd /lib/security
+
+If you are using another Linux distribution:
+
+       # cd /usr/lib/security
+
+1. Copy the appropriate AFS authentication library file to the directory to which you changed in the previous step. Create a symbolic link whose name does not mention the version. Omitting the version eliminates the need to edit the PAM configuration file if you later update the library file.
+
+If you use the AFS Authentication Server (kaserver process):
+
+       # cp /cdrom/i386_linux22/lib/pam_afs.so.1  .
+
+       # ln -s pam_afs.so.1 pam_afs.so
+
+If you use a Kerberos implementation of AFS authentication:
+
+       # cp /cdrom/i386_linux22/lib/pam_afs.krb.so.1   .
+
+       # ln -s pam_afs.krb.so.1 pam_afs.so
+
+1. For each service with which you want to use AFS authentication, insert an entry for the AFS PAM module into the auth section of the service's PAM configuration file. (Linux uses a separate configuration file for each service, unlike some other operating systems which list all services in a single file.) Mark the entry as sufficient in the second field.
+
+Place the AFS entry below any entries that impose conditions under which you want the service to fail for a user who does not meet the entry's requirements. Mark these entries required. Place the AFS entry above any entries that need to execute only if AFS authentication fails.
+
+Insert the following AFS entry if using the Red Hat distribution:
+
+       auth  sufficient  /lib/security/pam_afs.so   try_first_pass  ignore_root
+
+Insert the following AFS entry if using another distribution:
+
+       auth  sufficient  /usr/lib/security/pam_afs.so  try_first_pass  ignore_root
+
+Check the PAM config files also for "session" entries. If there are lines beginning with "session" then please insert this line too:
+
+       session  optional  /lib/security/pam_afs.so
+
+or
+
+       session  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_afs.so
+
+This guaranties that the user's tokens are deleted from memory after his session ends so that no other user coincidently gets those tokens without authorization! The following examples illustrate the recommended configuration of the configuration file for several services:
+
+Authentication Management (/etc/pam.d/login)
+
+       #%PAM-1.0
+       auth      required   /lib/security/pam_securetty.so
+       auth      required   /lib/security/pam_nologin.so
+       auth      sufficient /lib/security/pam_afs.so try_first_pass ignore_root
+       #                                  ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
+       #This enables AFS authentication for every user but root
+       auth      required   /lib/security/pam_pwdb.so shadow nullok
+       account   required   /lib/security/pam_pwdb.so
+       password  required   /lib/security/pam_cracklib.so
+       password  required   /lib/security/pam_pwdb.so shadow nullok use_authtok
+       session   optional   /lib/security/pam_afs.so
+       #Make sure tokens are deleted after the user logs out
+       session   required   /lib/security/pam_pwdb.so
+
+(/etc/pam.d/samba)
+
+       auth       required     /lib/security/pam_afs.so ignore_uid 100 set_token
+       #                                                ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
+       #Here, users with uid>100 are considered to belong to the AFS and users
+       #with uid<=100 are ignored by pam_afs. The token is retrieved already in
+       #pam_sm_authenticate() (this is an example pam config for a samba version
+       #that does not call pam_setcred(), it also does no sense to include session
+       #entries here since they would be ignored by this version of samba ).
+       account    required     /lib/security/pam_pwdb.so
+
+(/etc/pam.d/xscreensaver)
+
+       auth       sufficient   /lib/security/pam_afs.so ignore_uid 100 refresh_token
+       #                                                               ^^^^^^^^^^^^^
+       #Avoid generating a new PAG for the new tokens, use the already existing PAG and
+       #establish a fresh token in it.
+       auth       required     /lib/security/pam_pwdb.so try_first_pass
+
+(/etc/pam.d/httpd)
+
+       auth       required   /lib/security/pam_afs.so ignore_uid 100 dont_fork
+       #                                                             ^^^^^^^^^
+       #Don't fork for the verification of the password.
+
+Session Management (/etc/pam.d/su)
+
+       auth       sufficient   /lib/security/pam_afs.so ignore_uid 100
+       auth       required     /lib/security/pam_pwdb.so try_first_pass
+       account    required     /lib/security/pam_pwdb.so
+       password   required     /lib/security/pam_cracklib.so
+       password   required     /lib/security/pam_pwdb.so use_authtok
+       session    required     /lib/security/pam_pwdb.so
+       session    optional     /lib/security/pam_afs.so no_unlog
+       #                                                ^^^^^^^^
+       #Don't delete the token in this case, since the user may still
+       #need it (for example if somebody logs in and changes to root
+       #afterwards he may still want to access his home space in AFS).
+       session    required     /lib/security/pam_login_access.so
+       session    optional     /lib/security/pam_xauth.so
+
+(/etc/pam.d/xdm)
+
+       auth       required     /lib/security/pam_nologin.so
+       auth       required     /lib/security/pam_login_access.so
+       auth       sufficient   /lib/security/pam_afs.so ignore_uid 100 use_klog
+       auth       required     /lib/security/pam_pwdb.so try_first_pass
+       account    required     /lib/security/pam_pwdb.so
+       password   required     /lib/security/pam_cracklib.so
+       password   required     /lib/security/pam_pwdb.so shadow nullok use_authtok
+       session    optional     /lib/security/pam_afs.so remainlifetime 10
+       #                                                ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
+       #Wait 10 seconds before deleting the AFS tokens in order to give
+       #the programs of the X session some time to save their settings
+       #to AFS.
+       session    required     /lib/security/pam_pwdb.so
diff --git a/AFSLore/EnablingAFSLoginonSolarisSystems.mdwn b/AFSLore/EnablingAFSLoginonSolarisSystems.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..8163437
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,132 @@
+At this point you incorporate AFS into the operating system's Pluggable Authentication Module (PAM) scheme. PAM integrates all authentication mechanisms on the machine, including login, to provide the security infrastructure for authenticated access to and from the machine.
+
+Explaining PAM is beyond the scope of this document. It is assumed that you understand the syntax and meanings of settings in the PAM configuration file (for example, how the other entry works, the effect of marking an entry as required, optional, or sufficient, and so on).
+
+The following instructions explain how to alter the entries in the PAM configuration file for each service for which you wish to use AFS authentication. Other configurations possibly also work, but the instructions specify the recommended and tested configuration. Note: The instructions specify that you mark each entry as optional. However, marking some modules as optional can mean that they grant access to the corresponding service even when the user does not meet all of the module's requirements. In some operating system revisions, for example, if you mark as optional the module that controls login via a dial-up connection, it allows users to login without providing a password. See the IBM AFS Release Notes for a discussion of any limitations that apply to this operating system.
+
+Also, with some operating system versions you must install patches for PAM to interact correctly with certain authentication programs. For details, see the IBM AFS Release Notes.
+
+The recommended AFS-related entries in the PAM configuration file make use of one or more of the following three attributes.
+
+    try_first_pass
+
+This is a standard PAM attribute that can be included on entries after the first one for a service; it directs the module to use the password that was provided to the first module. For the AFS module, it means that AFS authentication succeeds if the password provided to the module listed first is the user's correct AFS password. For further discussion of this attribute and its alternatives, see the operating system's PAM documentation.
+
+    ignore_root
+
+This attribute, specific to the AFS PAM module, directs it to ignore not only the local superuser root, but also any user with UID 0 (zero).
+
+    setenv_password_expires
+
+This attribute, specific to the AFS PAM module, sets the environment variable PASSWORD\_EXPIRES to the expiration date of the user's AFS password, which is recorded in the Authentication Database.
+
+Perform the following steps to enable AFS login.
+
+1. Mount the AFS CD-ROM for Solaris on the /cdrom directory, if it is not already. Then change directory as indicated.
+
+       # cd /usr/lib/security
+
+1. Copy the AFS authentication library file to the /usr/lib/security directory. Then create a symbolic link to it whose name does not mention the version. Omitting the version eliminates the need to edit the PAM configuration file if you later update the library file.
+
+If you use the AFS Authentication Server (kaserver process):
+
+       # cp /cdrom/sysname/dest/lib/pam_afs.so.1 .
+
+       # ln -s pam_afs.so.1 pam_afs.so
+
+If you use a Kerberos implementation of AFS authentication:
+
+       # cp /cdrom/sysname/dest/lib/pam_afs.krb.so.1 .
+
+       # ln -s pam_afs.krb.so.1 pam_afs.so
+
+If the pam library is owned by the wrong group, it will fail to be called when you login.
+
+## <a name="Solaris 9"></a> Solaris 9
+
+       # chown root:bin pam_afs.krb.so.1
+
+## <a name="Solaris 8"></a> Solaris 8
+
+       # chown root:sys pam_afs.krb.so.1
+
+# <a name="Edit pam.conf"></a> Edit pam.conf
+
+Edit the Authentication management section of the Solaris PAM configuration file, /etc/pam.conf by convention. The entries in this section have the value auth in their second field.
+
+First edit the standard entries, which refer to the Solaris PAM module (usually, the file /usr/lib/security/pam\_unix.so.1) in their fourth field. For each service for which you want to use AFS authentication, edit the third field of its entry to read optional. The pam.conf file in the Solaris distribution usually includes standard entries for the login, rlogin, and rsh services, for instance.
+
+If there are services for which you want to use AFS authentication, but for which the pam.conf file does not already include a standard entry, you must create that entry and place the value optional in its third field. For instance, the Solaris pam.conf file does not usually include standard entries for the ftp or telnet services.
+
+Then create an AFS-related entry for each service, placing it immediately below the standard entry. The following example shows what the Authentication Management section looks like after you have you edited or created entries for the services mentioned previously. Note that the example AFS entries appear on two lines only for legibility.
+
+## <a name="pam.conf configuration for Solar"></a> pam.conf configuration for Solaris 9
+
+Note: leave the full path to the library intact for afs. This will allow it to work for both 32 bit and 64 bit Solaris.
+
+The "other" section is used by SSH authentication.
+
+Solaris 9 will not allow the line continuation char "\\" in pam.conf
+
+       login   auth required           pam_unix_auth.so.1
+       login   auth optional           /usr/lib/security/pam_afs.so try_first_pass  ignore_root  setenv_password_expires
+
+       rlogin  auth required           pam_unix_auth.so.1
+       rlogin  auth optional           /usr/lib/security/pam_afs.so try_first_pass  ignore_root  setenv_password_expires
+
+       rsh     auth required           pam_unix_auth.so.1
+       rsh     auth optional           /usr/lib/security/pam_afs.so try_first_pass  ignore_root
+
+       #
+       # Used when service name is not explicitly mentioned for authenctication
+       #
+       other   auth requisite          pam_authtok_get.so.1
+       other   auth required           pam_dhkeys.so.1
+       other   auth required           pam_unix_auth.so.1
+       other   auth optional           /usr/lib/security/pam_afs.so try_first_pass  ignore_root  setenv_password_expires
+
+    #   ftp     auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_unix.so.1
+    #   ftp     auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_afs.so  try_first_pass  ignore_root
+    #   telnet  auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_unix.so.1
+    #   telnet  auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_afs.so  try_first_pass  ignore_root  setenv_password_expires
+
+## <a name="pam.conf configuration for Solar"></a> pam.conf configuration for Solaris 6
+
+       login   auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_unix.so.1
+       login   auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_afs.so       \
+             try_first_pass  ignore_root  setenv_password_expires
+       rlogin  auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_unix.so.1
+       rlogin  auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_afs.so       \
+             try_first_pass  ignore_root  setenv_password_expires
+       rsh     auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_unix.so.1
+       rsh     auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_afs.so       \
+             try_first_pass  ignore_root
+       ftp     auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_unix.so.1
+       ftp     auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_afs.so       \
+             try_first_pass  ignore_root
+       telnet  auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_unix.so.1
+       telnet  auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_afs.so       \
+             try_first_pass  ignore_root  setenv_password_expires
+
+1. If you use the Common Desktop Environment (CDE) on the machine and want users to obtain an AFS token as they log in, also add or edit the following four entries in the Authentication management section. Note that the AFS-related entries appear on two lines here only for legibility.
+
+       dtlogin   auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_unix.so.1
+       dtlogin   auth  optional  /usr/lib/security/pam_afs.so     \
+             try_first_pass  ignore_root
+       dtsession  auth  optional /usr/lib/security/pam_unix.so.1
+       dtsession  auth  optional /usr/lib/security/pam_afs.so     \
+             try_first_pass  ignore_root
+
+1. Some Solaris distributions include a script that locates and removes unneeded files from various file systems. Its conventional location is /usr/lib/fs/nfs/nfsfind. The script generally uses an argument to the find command to define which file systems to search. In this step you modify the command to exclude the /afs directory. Otherwise, the command traverses the AFS filespace of every cell that is accessible from the machine, which can take many hours. The following alterations are possibilities, but you must verify that they are appropriate for your cell.
+
+The first possible alteration is to add the -local flag to the existing command, so that it looks like the following:
+
+            find $dir -local -type f -name .nfs\* -mtime +7 -mount -exec rm -f {} \;
+
+Another alternative is to exclude any directories whose names begin with the lowercase letter a or a non-alphabetic character.
+
+       find /[A-Zb-z]*  remainder of existing command
+
+Do not use the following command, which still searches under the /afs directory, looking for a subdirectory of type 4.2.
+
+       find / -fstype 4.2     /* do not use */
diff --git a/AFSLore/InitializationScriptonAIX.mdwn b/AFSLore/InitializationScriptonAIX.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..2142f79
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,30 @@
+Reboot the machine and log in again as the local superuser root.
+
+       # cd /
+
+       # shutdown -r now
+
+       login: root
+       Password: root_password
+
+Run the AFS initialization script.
+
+       # /etc/rc.afs
+
+[[Confirm Cache Manager Initialization|Main/ConfirmCacheManagerInitialization]]
+
+## <a name="Automatically Start AFS on Syste"></a> Automatically Start AFS on System Boot
+
+Now that you have confirmed that the AFS initialization script works correctly, take the action necessary to have it run automatically at each reboot.
+
+Edit the AIX initialization file, /etc/inittab, adding the following line to invoke the AFS initialization script. Place it just after the line that starts NFS daemons.
+
+       rcafs:2:wait:/etc/rc.afs > /dev/console 2>&1 # Start AFS services
+
+(Optional) There are now copies of the AFS initialization file in both the /usr/vice/etc and /etc directories. If you want to avoid potential confusion by guaranteeing that they are always the same, create a link between them. You can always retrieve the original script from the AFS CD-ROM if necessary.
+
+       # cd  /usr/vice/etc
+
+       # rm  rc.afs
+
+       # ln -s  /etc/rc.afs
diff --git a/AFSLore/InitializationScriptonDigitalUNIX.mdwn b/AFSLore/InitializationScriptonDigitalUNIX.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..00ec0d1
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,25 @@
+Run the AFS initialization script.
+
+       # /sbin/init.d/afs  start
+
+[[Confirm Cache Manager Initialization|Main/ConfirmCacheManagerInitialization]]
+
+## <a name="Automatically Start AFS on Syste"></a> Automatically Start AFS on System Boot
+
+Now that you have confirmed that the AFS initialization script works correctly, take the action necessary to have it run automatically at each reboot.
+
+Change to the /sbin/init.d directory and issue the ln -s command to create symbolic links that incorporate the AFS initialization script into the Digital UNIX startup and shutdown sequence.
+
+       # cd  /sbin/init.d
+
+       # ln -s  ../init.d/afs  /sbin/rc3.d/S67afs
+
+       # ln -s  ../init.d/afs  /sbin/rc0.d/K66afs
+
+(Optional) There are now copies of the AFS initialization file in both the /usr/vice/etc and /sbin/init.d directories. If you want to avoid potential confusion by guaranteeing that they are always the same, create a link between them. You can always retrieve the original script from the AFS CD-ROM if necessary.
+
+       # cd /usr/vice/etc
+
+       # rm afs.rc
+
+       # ln -s  /sbin/init.d/afs  afs.rc
diff --git a/AFSLore/InitializationScriptonHP-UX.mdwn b/AFSLore/InitializationScriptonHP-UX.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..1fbd392
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,25 @@
+Run the AFS initialization script.
+
+       # /sbin/init.d/afs  start
+
+[[Confirm Cache Manager Initialization|Main/ConfirmCacheManagerInitialization]]
+
+## <a name="Automatically Start AFS on Syste"></a> Automatically Start AFS on System Boot
+
+Now that you have confirmed that the AFS initialization script works correctly, take the action necessary to have it run automatically at each reboot.
+
+Change to the /sbin/init.d directory and issue the ln -s command to create symbolic links that incorporate the AFS initialization script into the HP-UX startup and shutdown sequence.
+
+       # cd /sbin/init.d
+
+       # ln -s ../init.d/afs /sbin/rc2.d/S460afs
+
+       # ln -s ../init.d/afs /sbin/rc2.d/K800afs
+
+(Optional) There are now copies of the AFS initialization file in both the /usr/vice/etc and /sbin/init.d directories. If you want to avoid potential confusion by guaranteeing that they are always the same, create a link between them. You can always retrieve the original script from the AFS CD-ROM if necessary.
+
+       # cd /usr/vice/etc
+
+       # rm afs.rc
+
+       # ln -s  /sbin/init.d/afs  afs.rc
diff --git a/AFSLore/InitializationScriptonIRIX.mdwn b/AFSLore/InitializationScriptonIRIX.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..a702fbb
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,42 @@
+If you have configured the machine to use the ml dynamic loader program, reboot the machine and log in again as the local superuser root.
+
+       # cd /
+
+       # shutdown -i6 -g0 -y
+
+       login: root
+       Password: root_password
+
+Issue the chkconfig command to activate the afsserver configuration variable.
+
+       # /etc/chkconfig -f afsserver on
+
+If you have configured this machine as an AFS client and want to it remain one, also issue the chkconfig command to activate the afsclient configuration variable.
+
+       # /etc/chkconfig -f afsclient on
+
+Run the AFS initialization script.
+
+       # /etc/init.d/afs  start
+
+[[Confirm Cache Manager Initialization|Main/ConfirmCacheManagerInitialization]]
+
+## <a name="Automatically Start AFS on Syste"></a> Automatically Start AFS on System Boot
+
+Now that you have confirmed that the AFS initialization script works correctly, take the action necessary to have it run automatically at each reboot.
+
+Change to the /etc/init.d directory and issue the ln -s command to create symbolic links that incorporate the AFS initialization script into the IRIX startup and shutdown sequence.
+
+       # cd /etc/init.d
+
+       # ln -s ../init.d/afs /etc/rc2.d/S35afs
+
+       # ln -s ../init.d/afs /etc/rc0.d/K35afs
+
+(Optional) There are now copies of the AFS initialization file in both the /usr/vice/etc and /etc/init.d directories. If you want to avoid potential confusion by guaranteeing that they are always the same, create a link between them. You can always retrieve the original script from the AFS CD-ROM if necessary.
+
+       # cd /usr/vice/etc
+
+       # rm afs.rc
+
+       # ln -s  /etc/init.d/afs  afs.rc
diff --git a/AFSLore/InitializationScriptonLinux.mdwn b/AFSLore/InitializationScriptonLinux.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..953e836
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,32 @@
+Reboot the machine and log in again as the local superuser root.
+
+       # cd /
+
+       # shutdown -r now
+
+       login: root
+       Password: root_password
+
+Run the AFS initialization script.
+
+       # /etc/rc.d/init.d/afs  start
+
+[[Confirm Cache Manager Initialization|Main/ConfirmCacheManagerInitialization]]
+
+## <a name="Automatically Start AFS on Syste"></a> Automatically Start AFS on System Boot
+
+Now that you have confirmed that the AFS initialization script works correctly, take the action necessary to have it run automatically at each reboot.
+
+Issue the chkconfig command to activate the afs configuration variable. Based on the instruction in the AFS initialization file that begins with the string #chkconfig, the command automatically creates the symbolic links that incorporate the script into the Linux startup and shutdown sequence.
+
+       # /sbin/chkconfig  --add afs
+
+(Optional) There are now copies of the AFS initialization file in both the /usr/vice/etc and /etc/rc.d/init.d directories, and copies of the afsd options file in both the /usr/vice/etc and /etc/sysconfig directories. If you want to avoid potential confusion by guaranteeing that the two copies of each file are always the same, create a link between them. You can always retrieve the original script or options file from the AFS CD-ROM if necessary.
+
+       # cd /usr/vice/etc
+
+       # rm afs.rc afs.conf
+
+       # ln -s  /etc/rc.d/init.d/afs  afs.rc
+
+       # ln -s  /etc/sysconfig/afs  afs.conf
diff --git a/AFSLore/InitializationScriptonSolaris.mdwn b/AFSLore/InitializationScriptonSolaris.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..277fdcf
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,34 @@
+Reboot the machine and log in again as the local superuser root.
+
+       # cd /
+
+       # shutdown -i6 -g0 -y
+
+       login: root
+       Password: root_password
+
+Run the AFS initialization script.
+
+       # /etc/init.d/afs  start
+
+[[Confirm Cache Manager Initialization|Main/ConfirmCacheManagerInitialization]]
+
+## <a name="Automatically Start AFS on Syste"></a> Automatically Start AFS on System Boot
+
+Now that you have confirmed that the AFS initialization script works correctly, take the action necessary to have it run automatically at each reboot.
+
+1. 1. 1. Change to the /etc/init.d directory and issue the ln -s command to create symbolic links that incorporate the AFS initialization script into the Solaris startup and shutdown sequence.
+
+       # cd /etc/init.d
+
+       # ln -s ../init.d/afs /etc/rc3.d/S99afs
+
+       # ln -s ../init.d/afs /etc/rc0.d/K66afs
+
+1. 1. 1. (Optional) There are now copies of the AFS initialization file in both the /usr/vice/etc and /etc/init.d directories. If you want to avoid potential confusion by guaranteeing that they are always the same, create a link between them. You can always retrieve the original script from the AFS CD-ROM if necessary.
+
+       # cd /usr/vice/etc
+
+       # rm afs.rc
+
+       # ln -s  /etc/init.d/afs  afs.rc
diff --git a/AFSLore/InstallingAdditionalClientMachines.mdwn b/AFSLore/InstallingAdditionalClientMachines.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..e2e0955
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,370 @@
+# <a name="Installing Additional Client Mac"></a> Installing Additional Client Machines
+
+This chapter describes how to install AFS client machines after you have installed the first AFS machine. Some parts of the installation differ depending on whether or not the new client is of the same AFS system type (uses the same AFS binaries) as a previously installed client machine. Summary of Procedures
+
+1. Incorporate AFS into the machine's kernel
+
+1. Define the machine's cell membership
+
+1. Define cache location and size
+
+1. Create the /usr/vice/etc/CellServDB file, which determines which foreign cells the client can access in addition to the local cell
+
+1. Create the /afs directory and start the Cache Manager
+
+1. Create and mount volumes for housing AFS client binaries (necessary only for clients of a new system type)
+
+1. Create a link from the local /usr/afsws directory to the AFS directory housing the AFS client binaries
+
+1. Modify the machine's authentication system to enable AFS users to obtain tokens at login
+
+# <a name="Creating AFS Directories on the"></a><a name="Creating AFS Directories on the "></a> Creating AFS Directories on the Local Disk
+
+Create the /usr/vice/etc directory on the local disk, to house client binaries and configuration files. Subsequent instructions copy files from the AFS CD-ROM into them. Create the /cdrom directory as a mount point for the CD-ROM, if it does not already exist.
+
+       # mkdir /usr/vice
+
+       # mkdir /usr/vice/etc
+
+       # mkdir /cdrom
+
+# <a name="Performing Platform-Specific Pro"></a> Performing Platform-Specific Procedures
+
+Every AFS client machine's kernel must incorporate AFS modifications. Some system types use a dynamic kernel loader program, whereas on other system types you build AFS modifications into a static kernel. Some system types support both methods.
+
+Also modify the machine's authentication system so that users obtain an AFS token as they log into the local file system. Using AFS is simpler and more convenient for your users if you make the modifications on all client machines. Otherwise, users must perform a two-step login procedure (login to the local file system and then issue the klog command). For further discussion of AFS authentication, see the chapter in the IBM AFS Administration Guide about cell configuration and administration issues.
+
+For convenience, the following sections group the two procedures by system type. Proceed to the appropriate section.
+
+\* Getting Started on AIX Systems
+
+\* Getting Started on Digital UNIX Systems
+
+\* Getting Started on HP-UX Systems
+
+\* Getting Started on IRIX Systems
+
+\* Getting Started on Linux Systems
+
+\* Getting Started on Solaris Systems
+
+# <a name="Getting Started on AIX Systems"></a> Getting Started on AIX Systems
+
+In this section you load AFS into the AIX kernel. Then incorporate AFS modifications into the machine's secondary authentication system, if you wish to enable AFS login.
+
+## <a name="Loading AFS into the AIX Kernel"></a> Loading AFS into the AIX Kernel
+
+[[Loading AFS into the AIX Kernel|Main/LoadingAFSIntoTheAIXKernel]]
+
+## <a name="Enabling AFS Login on AIX System"></a> Enabling AFS Login on AIX Systems
+
+[[Enabling AFS Login on AIX Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnAIXSystems]]
+
+Proceed to Loading and Creating Client Files.
+
+# <a name="Getting Started on Digital UNIX"></a><a name="Getting Started on Digital UNIX "></a> Getting Started on Digital UNIX Systems
+
+In this section you build AFS into the Digital UNIX kernel. Then incorporate AFS modifications into the machine's Security Integration Architecture (SIA) matrix, if you wish to enable AFS login.
+
+## <a name="Building AFS into the Digital UN"></a> Building AFS into the Digital UNIX Kernel
+
+[[Building AFS into the Digital UNIX Kernel|Main/BuildingAFSIntoTheDigitalUNIXKernel]]
+
+## <a name="Enabling AFS Login on Digital UN"></a> Enabling AFS Login on Digital UNIX Systems
+
+[[Enabling AFS Login on Digital UNIX Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnDigitalUNIXSystems]]
+
+Proceed to Loading and Creating Client Files.
+
+# <a name="Getting Started on HP-UX Systems"></a> Getting Started on HP-UX Systems
+
+In this section you build AFS into the HP-UX kernel. Then incorporate AFS modifications into the machine's Pluggable Authentication Module (PAM) system, if you wish to enable AFS login.
+
+## <a name="Building AFS into the HP-UX Kern"></a> Building AFS into the HP-UX Kernel
+
+[[Building AFS into the HP-UX Kernel|Main/BuildingAFSIntoTheHP-UXKernel]]
+
+## <a name="Enabling AFS Login on HP-UX Syst"></a> Enabling AFS Login on HP-UX Systems
+
+[[Enabling AFS Login on HP-UX Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnHP-UXSystems]]
+
+Proceed to Loading and Creating Client Files.
+
+# <a name="Getting Started on IRIX Systems"></a> Getting Started on IRIX Systems
+
+## <a name="Loading AFS Into The IRIX Kernel"></a> Loading AFS Into The IRIX Kernel
+
+[[Loading AFS into the IRIX Kernel|Main/LoadingAFSIntoTheIRIXKernel]]
+
+## <a name="Enabling AFS Login on IRIX Syste"></a> Enabling AFS Login on IRIX Systems
+
+[[Enabling AFS Login on IRIX Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnIRIXSystems]].
+
+After taking any necessary action, proceed to Loading and Creating Client Files.
+
+# <a name="Getting Started on Linux Systems"></a> Getting Started on Linux Systems
+
+In this section you load AFS into the Linux kernel. Then incorporate AFS modifications into the machine's Pluggable Authentication Module (PAM) system, if you wish to enable AFS login.
+
+## <a name="Loading AFS into the Linux Kerne"></a> Loading AFS into the Linux Kernel
+
+[[Loading AFS into the Linux Kernel|Main/LoadingAFSIntoTheLinuxKernel]]
+
+## <a name="Enabling AFS Login on Linux Syst"></a> Enabling AFS Login on Linux Systems
+
+[[Enabling AFS Login on Linux Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnLinuxSystems]]
+
+Proceed to Loading and Creating Client Files.
+
+# <a name="Getting Started on Solaris Syste"></a> Getting Started on Solaris Systems
+
+In this section you load AFS into the Solaris kernel. Then incorporate AFS modifications into the machine's Pluggable Authentication Module (PAM) system, if you wish to enable AFS login.
+
+## <a name="Loading AFS into the Solaris Ker"></a> Loading AFS into the Solaris Kernel
+
+[[Loading AFS into the Solaris Kernel|Main/LoadingAFSIntoTheSolarisKernel]]
+
+## <a name="Enabling AFS Login on Solaris Sy"></a> Enabling AFS Login on Solaris Systems
+
+[[Enabling AFS Login on Solaris Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnSolarisSystems]]
+
+Proceed to Loading and Creating Client Files.
+
+# <a name="Loading and Creating Client File"></a> Loading and Creating Client Files
+
+Now copy files from the AFS CD-ROM to the /usr/vice/etc directory. On some platforms that use a dynamic loader program to incorporate AFS modifications into the kernel, you have already copied over some the files. Copying them again does no harm.
+
+Every AFS client machine has a copy of the /usr/vice/etc/ThisCell file on its local disk to define the machine's cell membership for the AFS client programs that run on it. Among other functions, this file determines the following:
+
+\* The cell in which users authenticate when they log onto the machine, assuming it is using an AFS-modified login utility
+
+\* The cell in which users authenticate by default when they issue the klog command
+
+\* The cell membership of the AFS server processes that the AFS command interpreters on this machine contact by default
+
+Similarly, the /usr/vice/etc/CellServDB file on a client machine's local disk lists the database server machines in each cell that the local Cache Manager can contact. If there is no entry in the file for a cell, or the list of database server machines is wrong, then users working on this machine cannot access the cell. The chapter in the IBM AFS Administration Guide about administering client machines explains how to maintain the file after creating it. A version of the client [[CellServDB]] file was created during the installation of your cell's first machine (in Creating the Client [[CellServDB]] File). It is probably also appropriate for use on this machine.
+
+Remember that the Cache Manager consults the /usr/vice/etc/CellServDB file only at reboot, when it copies the information into the kernel. For the Cache Manager to perform properly, the [[CellServDB]] file must be accurate at all times. Refer to the chapter in the IBM AFS Administration Guide about administering client machines for instructions on updating this file, with or without rebooting.
+
+1. On the local /cdrom directory, mount the AFS CD-ROM for this machine's system type, if it is not already. For instructions on mounting CD-ROMs (either locally or remotely via NFS), consult the operating system documentation.
+
+1. Copy files to the local /usr/vice/etc directory.
+
+This step places a copy of the AFS initialization script (and related files, if applicable) into the /usr/vice/etc directory. In the preceding instructions for incorporating AFS into the kernel, you copied the script directly to the operating system's conventional location for initialization files. When you incorporate AFS into the machine's startup sequence in a later step, you can choose to link the two files.
+
+On some system types that use a dynamic kernel loader program, you previously copied AFS library files into a subdirectory of the /usr/vice/etc directory. On other system types, you copied the appropriate AFS library file directly to the directory where the operating system accesses it. The following commands do not copy or recopy the AFS library files into the /usr/vice/etc directory, because on some system types the library files consume a large amount of space. If you want to copy them, add the -r flag to the first cp command and skip the second cp command.
+
+# cd /cdrom/sysname/root.client/usr/vice/etc
+
+# cp -p \* /usr/vice/etc
+
+# cp -rp C /usr/vice/etc
+
+1. Create the /usr/vice/etc/ThisCell file.
+
+# echo "cellname" &gt; /usr/vice/etc/ThisCell
+
+1. Create the /usr/vice/etc/CellServDB file. Use a network file transfer program such as ftp or NFS to copy it from one of the following sources, which are listed in decreasing order of preference:
+
+\* Your cell's central [[CellServDB]] source file (the conventional location is /afs/cellname/common/etc/CellServDB)
+
+\* The global [[CellServDB]] file maintained by the AFS Product Support group
+
+\* An existing client machine in your cell
+
+\* The [[CellServDB]].sample file included in the sysname/root.client/usr/vice/etc directory of each AFS CD-ROM; add an entry for the local cell by following the instructions in [[Creating the Client CellServDB File|Main/CreatingTheClientCellServDBFile]]
+
+## <a name="Configuring the Cache"></a> Configuring the Cache
+
+[[Configuring the Cache|Main/ConfiguringTheCache]]
+
+## <a name="Configuring the Cache Manager"></a> Configuring the Cache Manager
+
+[[Configuring the Cache Manager|Main/ConfiguringTheCacheManager]]
+
+## <a name="Starting the Cache Manager and I"></a> Starting the Cache Manager and Installing the AFS Initialization Script
+
+In this section you run the AFS initialization script to start the Cache Manager. If the script works correctly, perform the steps that incorporate it into the machine's startup and shutdown sequence. If there are problems during the initialization, attempt to resolve them. The AFS Product Support group can provide assistance if necessary.
+
+On machines that use a disk cache, it can take a while for the afsd program to run the first time on a machine, because it must create all of the Vn files in the cache directory. Subsequent Cache Manager initializations do not take nearly as long, because the Vn files already exist.
+
+On system types that use a dynamic loader program, you must reboot the machine before running the initialization script, so that it can freshly load AFS modifications into the kernel.
+
+Proceed to the instructions for your system type:
+
+\* Running the Script on AIX Systems
+
+\* Running the Script on Digital UNIX Systems
+
+\* Running the Script on HP-UX Systems
+
+\* Running the Script on IRIX Systems
+
+\* Running the Script on Linux Systems
+
+\* Running the Script on Solaris Systems
+
+## <a name="Running the Script on AIX System"></a> Running the Script on AIX Systems
+
+[[Initialization Script on AIX|Main/InitializationScriptOnAIX]]
+
+If a volume for housing AFS binaries for this machine's system type does not already exist, proceed to Setting Up Volumes and Loading Binaries into AFS. Otherwise, the installation is complete.
+
+## <a name="Running the Script on Digital UN"></a> Running the Script on Digital UNIX Systems
+
+[[Initialization Script on Digital UNIX|Main/InitializationScriptOnDigitalUNIX]]
+
+If a volume for housing AFS binaries for this machine's system type does not already exist, proceed to Setting Up Volumes and Loading Binaries into AFS. Otherwise, the installation is complete.
+
+## <a name="Running the Script on HP-UX Syst"></a> Running the Script on HP-UX Systems
+
+[[Initialization Script on HP-UX|Main/InitializationScriptOnHP-UX]]
+
+If a volume for housing AFS binaries for this machine's system type does not already exist, proceed to Setting Up Volumes and Loading Binaries into AFS. Otherwise, the installation is complete.
+
+## <a name="Running the Script on IRIX Syste"></a> Running the Script on IRIX Systems
+
+[[Initialization Script on IRIX|Main/InitializationScriptOnIRIX]]
+
+If a volume for housing AFS binaries for this machine's system type does not already exist, proceed to Setting Up Volumes and Loading Binaries into AFS. Otherwise, the installation is complete.
+
+## <a name="Running the Script on Linux Syst"></a> Running the Script on Linux Systems
+
+[[Initialization Script on Linux|Main/InitializationScriptOnLinux]]
+
+If a volume for housing AFS binaries for this machine's system type does not already exist, proceed to Setting Up Volumes and Loading Binaries into AFS. Otherwise, the installation is complete.
+
+## <a name="Running the Script on Solaris Sy"></a> Running the Script on Solaris Systems
+
+[[Initialization Script on Solaris|Main/InitializationScriptOnSolaris]]
+
+If a volume for housing AFS binaries for this machine's system type does not already exist, proceed to Setting Up Volumes and Loading Binaries into AFS. Otherwise, the installation is complete.
+
+# <a name="Setting Up Volumes and Loading B"></a> Setting Up Volumes and Loading Binaries into AFS
+
+In this section, you link /usr/afsws on the local disk to the directory in AFS that houses AFS binaries for this system type. The conventional name for the AFS directory is /afs/cellname/sysname/usr/afsws.
+
+If this machine is an existing system type, the AFS directory presumably already exists. You can simply create a link from the local /usr/afsws directory to it. Follow the instructions in Linking /usr/afsws on an Existing System Type.
+
+If this machine is a new system type (there are no AFS machines of this type in your cell), you must first create and mount volumes to store its AFS binaries, and then create the link from /usr/afsws to the new directory. See Creating Binary Volumes for a New System Type.
+
+You can also store UNIX system binaries (the files normally stored in local disk directories such as /bin, /etc, and /lib) in volumes mounted under /afs/cellname/sysname. See Storing System Binaries in AFS .
+
+Linking /usr/afsws on an Existing System Type
+
+If this client machine is an existing system type, there is already a volume mounted in the AFS filespace that houses AFS client binaries for it.
+
+1. Create /usr/afsws on the local disk as a symbolic link to the directory /afs/cellname/@sys/usr/afsws. You can specify the actual system name instead of @sys if you wish, but the advantage of using @sys is that it remains valid if you upgrade this machine to a different system type.
+
+# ln -s /afs/cellname/@sys/usr/afsws /usr/afsws
+
+1. (Optional) If you believe it is helpful to your users to access the AFS documents in a certain format via a local disk directory, create /usr/afsdoc on the local disk as a symbolic link to the documentation directory in AFS (/afs/cellname/afsdoc/format\_name).
+
+# ln -s /afs/cellname/afsdoc/format\_name /usr/afsdoc
+
+An alternative is to create a link in each user's home directory to the /afs/cellname/afsdoc/format\_name directory.
+
+# <a name="Creating Binary Volumes for a Ne"></a> Creating Binary Volumes for a New System Type
+
+If this client machine is a new system type, you must create and mount volumes for its binaries before you can link the local /usr/afsws directory to an AFS directory.
+
+To create and mount the volumes, you use the klog command to authenticate as an administrator and then issue commands from the vos and fs command suites. However, the command binaries are not yet available on this machine (by convention, they are accessible via the /usr/afsws link that you are about to create). You have two choices:
+
+\* Perform all steps except the last one (Step 10) on an existing AFS machine. On a file server machine, the klog, fs and vos binaries reside in the /usr/afs/bin directory. On client machines, the klog and fs binaries reside in the /usr/afsws/bin directory and the vos binary in the /usr/afsws/etc directory. Depending on how your PATH environment variable is set, you possibly need to precede the command names with a pathname.
+
+If you work on another AFS machine, be sure to substitute the new system type name for the sysname argument in the following commands, not the system type of the machine on which you are issuing the commands.
+
+\* Copy the necessary command binaries to a temporary location on the local disk, which enables you to perform the steps on the local machine. The following procedure installs them in the /tmp directory and removes them at the end. Depending on how your PATH environment variable is set, you possibly need to precede the command names with a pathname.
+
+Perform the following steps to create a volume for housing AFS binaries.
+
+1. Working either on the local machine or another AFS machine, mount the AFS CD-ROM for the new system type on the /cdrom directory, if it is not already. For instructions on mounting CD-ROMs (either locally or remotely via NFS), consult the operating system documentation.
+
+1. If working on the local machine, copy the necessary binaries to a temporary location on the local disk. Substitute a different directory name for /tmp if you wish.
+
+# cd /cdrom/new\_sysname/root.server/usr/afs/bin
+
+# cp -p klog /tmp
+
+# cp -p fs /tmp
+
+# cp -p vos /tmp
+
+1. Authenticate as the user admin.
+
+# klog admin
+
+<dl>
+  <dt> Password</dt>
+  <dd> admin_password </dd>
+</dl>
+
+1. Issue the vos create command to create volumes for storing the AFS client binaries for this system type. The following example instruction creates volumes called sysname, sysname.usr, and sysname.usr.afsws. Refer to the IBM AFS Release Notes to learn the proper value of sysname for this system type.
+
+# vos create   sysname
+
+# vos create   sysname.usr
+
+# vos create   sysname.usr.afsws
+
+1. Issue the fs mkmount command to mount the newly created volumes. Because the root.cell volume is replicated, you must precede the cellname part of the pathname with a period to specify the read/write mount point, as shown. Then issue the vos release command to release a new replica of the root.cell volume, and the fs checkvolumes command to force the local Cache Manager to access them.
+
+# fs mkmount -dir /afs/.cellname/sysname -vol sysname
+
+# fs mkmount -dir /afs/.cellname/sysname/usr -vol sysname.usr
+
+# fs mkmount -dir /afs/.cellname/sysname/usr/afsws -vol sysname.usr.afsws
+
+# vos release root.cell
+
+# fs checkvolumes
+
+1. Issue the fs setacl command to grant the l (lookup) and r (read) permissions to the system:anyuser group on each new directory's ACL.
+
+# cd /afs/.cellname/sysname
+
+# fs setacl -dir . usr usr/afsws -acl system:anyuser rl
+
+1. Issue the fs setquota command to set an unlimited quota on the volume mounted at the /afs/cellname/sysname/usr/afsws directory. This enables you to copy all of the appropriate files from the CD-ROM into the volume without exceeding the volume's quota.
+
+If you wish, you can set the volume's quota to a finite value after you complete the copying operation. At that point, use the vos examine command to determine how much space the volume is occupying. Then issue the fs setquota command to set a quota that is slightly larger.
+
+# fs setquota /afs/.cellname/sysname/usr/afsws 0
+
+1. Copy the contents of the indicated directories from the CD-ROM into the /afs/cellname/sysname/usr/afsws directory.
+
+# cd /afs/.cellname/sysname/usr/afsws
+
+# cp -rp /cdrom/sysname/bin .
+
+# cp -rp /cdrom/sysname/etc .
+
+# cp -rp /cdrom/sysname/include .
+
+# cp -rp /cdrom/sysname/lib .
+
+1. Issue the fs setacl command to set the ACL on each directory appropriately. To comply with the terms of your AFS License agreement, you must prevent unauthorized users from accessing AFS software. To enable access for locally authenticated users only, set the ACL on the etc, include, and lib subdirectories to grant the l and r permissions to the system:authuser group rather than the system:anyuser group. The system:anyuser group must retain the l and r permissions on the bin subdirectory to enable unauthenticated users to access the klog binary. To ensure that unauthorized users are not accessing AFS software, check periodically that the ACLs on these directories are set properly.
+
+# cd /afs/.cellname/sysname/usr/afsws
+
+# fs setacl -dir etc include lib -acl system:authuser rl system:anyuser none
+
+10. Perform this step on the new client machine even if you have performed the previous steps on another machine. Create /usr/afsws on the local disk as a symbolic link to the directory /afs/cellname/@sys/usr/afsws. You can specify the actual system name instead of @sys if you wish, but the advantage of using @sys is that it remains valid if you upgrade this machine to a different system type.
+
+# ln -s /afs/cellname/@sys/usr/afsws /usr/afsws
+
+11. (Optional) To enable users to issue commands from the AFS suites (such as fs) without having to specify a pathname to their binaries, include the /usr/afsws/bin and /usr/afsws/etc directories in the PATH environment variable you define in each user's shell initialization file (such as .cshrc).
+
+12. (Optional) If you believe it is helpful to your users to access the AFS documents in a certain format via a local disk directory, create /usr/afsdoc on the local disk as a symbolic link to the documentation directory in AFS (/afs/cellname/afsdoc/format\_name).
+
+# ln -s /afs/cellname/afsdoc/format\_name /usr/afsdoc
+
+An alternative is to create a link in each user's home directory to the /afs/cellname/afsdoc/format\_name directory.
+
+13. (Optional) If working on the local machine, remove the AFS binaries from the temporary location. They are now accessible in the /usr/afsws directory.
+
+# cd /tmp
+
+# rm klog fs vos
+
+� IBM Corporation 2000. All Rights Reserved
diff --git a/AFSLore/InstallingAdditionalServerMachines.mdwn b/AFSLore/InstallingAdditionalServerMachines.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..1136286
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,652 @@
+<div>
+  <ul>
+    <li><a href="#Installing Additional Server Mac">Installing Additional Server Machines</a></li>
+    <li><a href="#Installing an Additional File Se">Installing an Additional File Server Machine</a></li>
+    <li><a href="#Creating AFS Directories and Per"> Creating AFS Directories and Performing Platform-Specific Procedures</a></li>
+    <li><a href="#Getting Started on AIX Systems"> Getting Started on AIX Systems</a><ul>
+        <li><a href="#Replacing the fsck Program Helpe"> Replacing the fsck Program Helper on AIX Systems</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Configuring Server Volumes on AI"> Configuring Server Volumes on AIX Systems</a></li>
+      </ul>
+    </li>
+    <li><a href="#Getting Started on Digital UNIX"> Getting Started on Digital UNIX Systems</a><ul>
+        <li><a href="#Replacing the fsck Program on Di"> Replacing the fsck Program on Digital UNIX Systems</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Configuring Server Volumes on Di"> Configuring Server Volumes on Digital UNIX Systems</a></li>
+      </ul>
+    </li>
+    <li><a href="#Getting Started on HP-UX Systems"> Getting Started on HP-UX Systems</a><ul>
+        <li><a href="#Configuring the AFS-modified fsc"> Configuring the AFS-modified fsck Program on HP-UX Systems</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Configuring Server Volumes on HP"> Configuring Server Volumes on HP-UX Systems</a></li>
+      </ul>
+    </li>
+    <li><a href="#Getting Started on IRIX Systems"> Getting Started on IRIX Systems</a><ul>
+        <li><a href="#Configuring Server Volumes on IR"> Configuring Server Volumes on IRIX Systems</a></li>
+      </ul>
+    </li>
+    <li><a href="#Getting Started on Linux Systems"> Getting Started on Linux Systems</a><ul>
+        <li><a href="#Configuring Server Volumes on Li"> Configuring Server Volumes on Linux Systems</a></li>
+      </ul>
+    </li>
+    <li><a href="#Getting Started on Solaris Syste"> Getting Started on Solaris Systems</a><ul>
+        <li><a href="#Configuring the AFS-modified fsc"> Configuring the AFS-modified fsck Program on Solaris Systems</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Configuring Server Volumes On So"> Configuring Server Volumes On Solaris</a></li>
+      </ul>
+    </li>
+    <li><a href="#Starting Server Programs">Starting Server Programs</a></li>
+    <li><a href="#Installing Client Functionality"> Installing Client Functionality</a></li>
+    <li><a href="#Completing the Installation"> Completing the Installation</a><ul>
+        <li><a href="#On AIX systems:"> On AIX systems:</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#On Digital UNIX systems:"> On Digital UNIX systems:</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#On HP-UX systems:"> On HP-UX systems:</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#On IRIX systems:"> On IRIX systems:</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#On Linux systems:"> On Linux systems:</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#On Solaris systems:"> On Solaris systems:</a></li>
+      </ul>
+    </li>
+    <li><a href="#Installing Database Server Funct">Installing Database Server Functionality</a><ul>
+        <li><a href="#Summary of Procedures">Summary of Procedures</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Instructions">Instructions</a></li>
+      </ul>
+    </li>
+    <li><a href="#Removing Database Server Functio">Removing Database Server Functionality</a><ul>
+        <li><a href="#Summary of Procedures">Summary of Procedures</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Instructions">Instructions</a></li>
+      </ul>
+    </li>
+  </ul>
+</div>
+
+# <a name="Installing Additional Server Mac"></a> Installing Additional Server Machines
+
+Instructions for the following procedures appear in the indicated section of this chapter.
+
+- Installing an Additional File Server Machine
+
+- Installing Database Server Functionality
+
+- Removing Database Server Functionality
+
+The instructions make the following assumptions.
+
+- You have already installed your cell's first file server machine by following the instructions in Installing the First AFS Machine
+
+- You are logged in as the local superuser root
+
+- You are working at the console
+
+- A standard version of one of the operating systems supported by the current version of AFS is running on the machine
+
+- You can access the data on the AFS CD-ROMs, either through a local CD-ROM drive or via an NFS mount of a CD-ROM drive attached to a machine that is accessible by network
+
+- All files on the CD-ROM are owned by root. i.e. The files that you install should be owned by root, or the standard application user for the system.
+
+# <a name="Installing an Additional File Se"></a> Installing an Additional File Server Machine
+
+The procedure for installing a new file server machine is similar to installing the first file server machine in your cell. There are a few parts of the installation that differ depending on whether the machine is the same AFS system type as an existing file server machine or is the first file server machine of its system type in your cell. The differences mostly concern the source for the needed binaries and files, and what portions of the Update Server you install:
+
+- On a new system type, you must load files and binaries from the AFS CD-ROM. You install the server portion of the Update Server to make this machine the binary distribution machine for its system type.
+
+- On an existing system type, you can copy files and binaries from a previously installed file server machine, rather than from the CD-ROM. You install the client portion of the Update Server to accept updates of binaries, because a previously installed machine of this type was installed as the binary distribution machine.
+
+These instructions are brief; for more detailed information, refer to the corresponding steps in Installing the First AFS Machine.
+
+To install a new file server machine, perform the following procedures:
+
+1. Copy needed binaries and files onto this machine's local disk
+
+1. Incorporate AFS modifications into the kernel
+
+1. Configure partitions for storing volumes
+
+1. Replace the standard fsck utility with the AFS-modified version on some system types
+
+1. Start the Basic [[OverSeer]] (BOS) Server
+
+1. Start the appropriate portion of the Update Server
+
+1. Start the fs process, which incorporates three component processes: the File Server, Volume Server, and Salvager
+
+1. Start the controller process (called runntp) for the Network Time Protocol Daemon, which synchronizes clocks
+
+After completing the instructions in this section, you can install database server functionality on the machine according to the instructions in Installing Database Server Functionality.
+
+# <a name="Creating AFS Directories and Per"></a> Creating AFS Directories and Performing Platform-Specific Procedures
+
+Create the /usr/afs and /usr/vice/etc directories on the local disk. Subsequent instructions copy files from the AFS distribution CD-ROM into them, at the appropriate point for each system type.
+
+       # mkdir /usr/afs
+
+       # mkdir /usr/afs/bin
+
+       # mkdir /usr/vice
+
+       # mkdir /usr/vice/etc
+
+       # mkdir /cdrom
+
+As on the first file server machine, the initial procedures in installing an additional file server machine vary a good deal from platform to platform. For convenience, the following sections group together all of the procedures for a system type. Most of the remaining procedures are the same on every system type, but differences are noted as appropriate. The initial procedures are the following.
+
+- Incorporate AFS modifications into the kernel, either by using a dynamic kernel loader program or by building a new static kernel
+
+- Configure server partitions to house AFS volumes
+
+- Replace the operating system vendor's fsck program with a version that recognizes AFS data
+
+- If the machine is to remain an AFS client machine, modify the machine's authentication system so that users obtain an AFS token as they log into the local file system. (For this procedure only, the instructions direct you to the platform-specific section in Installing the First AFS Machine.)
+
+To continue, proceed to the section for this system type:
+
+- Getting Started on AIX Systems
+
+- Getting Started on Digital UNIX Systems
+
+- Getting Started on HP-UX Systems
+
+- Getting Started on IRIX Systems
+
+- Getting Started on Linux Systems
+
+- Getting Started on Solaris Systems
+
+# <a name="Getting Started on AIX Systems"></a> Getting Started on AIX Systems
+
+[[Loading AFS into the AIX Kernel|Main/LoadingAFSIntoTheAIXKernel]]
+
+## <a name="Replacing the fsck Program Helpe"></a> Replacing the fsck Program Helper on AIX Systems
+
+Never run the standard fsck program on AFS server partitions. It discards AFS volumes.
+
+[[Replacing the fsck Program Helper on AIX Systems|Main/ReplacingTheFsckProgramHelperOnAIXSystems]]
+
+## <a name="Configuring Server Volumes on AI"></a> Configuring Server Volumes on AIX Systems
+
+If this system is going to be used as a file server to share some of its disk space, create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). If it is not going to be a file server you can skip this step.
+
+[[Configuring Server Volumes on AIX|Main/ConfiguringServerVolumesOnAIX]]
+
+If the machine is to remain an AFS client, incorporate AFS into its authentication system, following the instructions in [[Enabling AFS Login on AIX Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnAIXSystems]].
+
+Proceed to Starting Server Programs.
+
+# <a name="Getting Started on Digital UNIX"></a><a name="Getting Started on Digital UNIX "></a> Getting Started on Digital UNIX Systems
+
+Begin by building AFS modifications into the kernel, then configure server partitions and replace the Digital UNIX fsck program with a version that correctly handles AFS volumes.
+
+If the machine's hardware and software configuration exactly matches another Digital UNIX machine on which AFS is already built into the kernel, you can copy the kernel from that machine to this one. In general, however, it is better to build AFS modifications into the kernel on each machine according to the following instructions.
+
+[[Building AFS into the Digital UNIX Kernel|Main/BuildingAFSIntoTheDigitalUNIXKernel]]
+
+## <a name="Replacing the fsck Program on Di"></a> Replacing the fsck Program on Digital UNIX Systems
+
+Never run the standard fsck program on AFS server partitions. It discards AFS volumes.
+
+[[Replacing the fsck Program on Digital UNIX Systems|Main/ReplacingTheFsckProgramOnDigitalUNIXSystems]]
+
+## <a name="Configuring Server Volumes on Di"></a> Configuring Server Volumes on Digital UNIX Systems
+
+If this system is going to be used as a file server to share some of its disk space, create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). If it is not going to be a file server you can skip this step.
+
+[[Configuring Server Volumes on Digital UNIX|Main/ConfiguringServerVolumesOnDigitalUNIX]]
+
+If the machine is to remain an AFS client, incorporate AFS into its authentication system, following the instructions in [[Enabling AFS Login on Digital UNIX Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnDigitalUNIXSystems]].
+
+Proceed to Starting Server Programs.
+
+# <a name="Getting Started on HP-UX Systems"></a> Getting Started on HP-UX Systems
+
+Begin by building AFS modifications into the kernel, then configure server partitions and replace the HP-UX fsck program with a version that correctly handles AFS volumes.
+
+[[Building AFS into the HP-UX Kernel|Main/BuildingAFSIntoTheHP-UXKernel]]
+
+## <a name="Configuring the AFS-modified fsc"></a> Configuring the AFS-modified fsck Program on HP-UX Systems
+
+Never run the standard fsck program on AFS server partitions. It discards AFS volumes.
+
+[[Configuring the AFS-modified fsck Program on HP-UX Systems|Main/ConfiguringTheAFS-modifiedFsckProgramOnHP-UXSystems]]
+
+## <a name="Configuring Server Volumes on HP"></a> Configuring Server Volumes on HP-UX Systems
+
+If this system is going to be used as a file server to share some of its disk space, create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). If it is not going to be a file server you can skip this step.
+
+[[Configuring Server Volumes on HP-UX|Main/ConfiguringServerVolumesOnHP-UX]]
+
+If the machine is to remain an AFS client, incorporate AFS into its authentication system, following the instructions in [[Enabling AFS Login on HP-UX Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnHP-UXSystems]].
+
+Proceed to Starting Server Programs.
+
+# <a name="Getting Started on IRIX Systems"></a> Getting Started on IRIX Systems
+
+Begin by incorporating AFS modifications into the kernel. Either use the ml dynamic loader program, or build a static kernel. Then configure partitions to house AFS volumes. AFS supports use of both EFS and XFS partitions for housing AFS volumes. SGI encourages use of XFS partitions.
+
+You do not need to replace IRIX fsck program, because the version that SGI distributes handles AFS volumes properly.
+
+[[Loading AFS into the IRIX Kernel|Main/LoadingAFSIntoTheIRIXKernel]]
+
+## <a name="Configuring Server Volumes on IR"></a> Configuring Server Volumes on IRIX Systems
+
+If this system is going to be used as a file server to share some of its disk space, create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). If it is not going to be a file server you can skip this step.
+
+[[Configuring Server Volumes on IRIX|Main/ConfiguringServerVolumesOnIRIX]]
+
+1. If the machine is to remain an AFS client, incorporate AFS into its authentication system, following the instructions in [[Enabling AFS Login on IRIX Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnIRIXSystems]].
+
+1. Proceed to Starting Server Programs.
+
+# <a name="Getting Started on Linux Systems"></a> Getting Started on Linux Systems
+
+[[Loading AFS into the Linux Kernel|Main/LoadingAFSIntoTheLinuxKernel]]
+
+## <a name="Configuring Server Volumes on Li"></a> Configuring Server Volumes on Linux Systems
+
+If this system is going to be used as a file server to share some of its disk space, create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). If it is not going to be a file server you can skip this step.
+
+[[Configuring Server Volumes on Linux|Main/ConfiguringServerVolumesOnLinux]]
+
+If the machine is to remain an AFS client, incorporate AFS into its authentication system, following the instructions in [[Enabling AFS Login on Linux Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnLinuxSystems]].
+
+Proceed to Starting Server Programs.
+
+# <a name="Getting Started on Solaris Syste"></a> Getting Started on Solaris Systems
+
+[[Loading AFS into the Solaris Kernel|Main/LoadingAFSIntoTheSolarisKernel]]
+
+## <a name="Configuring the AFS-modified fsc"></a> Configuring the AFS-modified fsck Program on Solaris Systems
+
+Never run the standard fsck program on AFS server partitions. It discards AFS volumes.
+
+[[Configuring the AFS-modified fsck Program on Solaris Systems|Main/ConfiguringTheAFS-modifiedFsckProgramOnSolarisSystems]]
+
+## <a name="Configuring Server Volumes On So"></a> Configuring Server Volumes On Solaris
+
+If this system is going to be used as a file server to share some of its disk space, create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). If it is not going to be a file server you can skip this step.
+
+[[Configuring Server Volumes on Solaris|Main/ConfiguringServerVolumesOnSolaris]]
+
+If the machine is to remain an AFS client, incorporate AFS into its authentication system, following the instructions in [[Enabling AFS Login on Solaris Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnSolarisSystems]].
+
+Proceed to Starting Server Programs.
+
+# <a name="Starting Server Programs"></a> Starting Server Programs
+
+In this section you initialize the BOS Server, the Update Server, the controller process for NTPD, and the fs process. You begin by copying the necessary server files to the local disk.
+
+- Copy file server binaries to the local /usr/afs/bin directory.
+
+- On a machine of an existing system type, you can either load files from the AFS CD-ROM or use a remote file transfer protocol to copy files from an existing server machine of the same system type. To load from the CD-ROM, see the instructions just following for a machine of a new system type. If using a remote file transfer protocol, copy the complete contents of the existing server machine's /usr/afs/bin directory.
+
+- On a machine of a new system type, you must use the following instructions to copy files from the AFS CD-ROM.
+
+- - On the local /cdrom directory, mount the AFS CD-ROM for this machine's system type, if it is not already. For instructions on mounting CD-ROMs (either locally or remotely via NFS), consult the operating system documentation.
+
+- - Copy files from the CD-ROM to the local /usr/afs directory.
+
+       # cd /cdrom/<sys_version>/dest/root.server/usr/afs
+
+       # cp -rp  *  /usr/afs
+
+1. Copy the contents of the /usr/afs/etc directory from an existing file server machine, using a remote file transfer protocol such as ftp or NFS. If you use a system control machine, it is best to copy the contents of its /usr/afs/etc directory. If you choose not to run a system control machine, copy the directory's contents from any existing file server machine.
+
+1. Change to the /usr/afs/bin directory and start the BOS Server (bosserver process). Include the -noauth flag to prevent the AFS processes from performing authorization checking. This is a grave compromise of security; finish the remaining instructions in this section in an uninterrupted pass.
+
+       # cd /usr/afs/bin
+
+       # ./bosserver -noauth &
+
+1. If you run a system control machine, create the upclientetc process as an instance of the client portion of the Update Server. It accepts updates of the common configuration files stored in the system control machine's /usr/afs/etc directory from the upserver process (server portion of the Update Server) running on that machine. The cell's first file server machine was installed as the system control machine in Starting the Server Portion of the Update Server. (If you do not run a system control machine, you must update the contents of the /usr/afs/etc directory on each file server machine, using the appropriate bos commands.)
+
+By default, the Update Server performs updates every 300 seconds (five minutes). Use the -t argument to specify a different number of seconds. For the machine name argument, substitute the name of the machine you are installing. The command appears on multiple lines here only for legibility reasons.
+
+       # ./bos create  <machine name> upclientetc simple  \
+             "/usr/afs/bin/upclient  <system control machine>  \
+             [-t  <time>]  /usr/afs/etc" -cell  <cell name>  -noauth
+
+1. Create an instance of the Update Server to handle distribution of the file server binaries stored in the /usr/afs/bin directory.
+
+\* If this is the first file server machine of its AFS system type, create the upserver process as an instance of the server portion of the Update Server. It distributes its copy of the file server process binaries to the other file server machines of this system type that you install in future. Creating this process makes this machine the binary distribution machine for its type.
+
+       # ./bos create  <machine name> upserver  simple  \
+             "/usr/afs/bin/upserver -clear /usr/afs/bin"   \
+             -cell <cell name>  -noauth
+
+\* If this machine is an existing system type, create the upclientbin process as an instance of the client portion of the Update Server. It accepts updates of the AFS binaries from the upserver process running on the binary distribution machine for its system type. For distribution to work properly, the upserver process must already by running on that machine.
+
+Use the -clear argument to specify that the upclientbin process requests unencrypted transfer of the binaries in the /usr/afs/bin directory. Binaries are not sensitive and encrypting them is time-consuming.
+
+By default, the Update Server performs updates every 300 seconds (five minutes). Use the -t argument to specify an different number of seconds.
+
+       # ./bos create  <machine name> upclientbin simple  \
+            "/usr/afs/bin/upclient <binary distribution machine>   \
+            [-t <time>] -clear /usr/afs/bin" -cell <cell name>  -noauth
+
+1. Start the runntp process, which configures the Network Time Protocol Daemon (NTPD) to choose a database server machine chosen randomly from the local /usr/afs/etc/CellServDB file as its time source. In the standard configuration, the first database server machine installed in your cell refers to a time source outside the cell, and serves as the basis for clock synchronization on all server machines.
+
+       # ./bos create  <machine name> runntp simple  \
+             /usr/afs/bin/runntp -cell <cell name>  -noauth
+<dl>
+  <dd>
+    <dl>
+      <dt> Note</dt>
+      <dd> Do not run the runntp process if NTPD or another time synchronization protocol is already running on the machine. Some versions of some operating systems run a time synchronization program by default, as detailed in the IBM AFS Release Notes. </dd>
+    </dl>
+  </dd>
+</dl>
+
+Attempting to run multiple instances of the NTPD causes an error. Running NTPD together with another time synchronization protocol is unnecessary and can cause instability in the clock setting.
+
+1. Start the fs process, which binds together the File Server, Volume Server, and Salvager.
+
+       # ./bos create  <machine name> fs fs   \
+             /usr/afs/bin/fileserver /usr/afs/bin/volserver  \
+             /usr/afs/bin/salvager -cell <cell name>  -noauth
+
+# <a name="Installing Client Functionality"></a> Installing Client Functionality
+
+If you want this machine to be a client as well as a server, follow the instructions in this section. Otherwise, skip to Completing the Installation.
+
+Begin by loading the necessary client files to the local disk. Then create the necessary configuration files and start the Cache Manager. For more detailed explanation of the procedures involved, see the corresponding instructions in Installing the First AFS Machine (in the sections following Overview: Installing Client Functionality).
+
+If another AFS machine of this machine's system type exists, the AFS binaries are probably already accessible in your AFS filespace (the conventional location is /afs/cellname/sysname/usr/afsws). If not, or if this is the first AFS machine of its type, copy the AFS binaries for this system type into an AFS volume by following the instructions in Storing AFS Binaries in AFS. Because this machine is not yet an AFS client, you must perform the procedure on an existing AFS machine. However, remember to perform the final step (linking the local directory /usr/afsws to the appropriate location in the AFS file tree) on this machine itself. If you also want to create AFS volumes to house UNIX system binaries for the new system type, see Storing System Binaries in AFS.
+
+1. Copy client binaries and files to the local disk.
+
+\* On a machine of an existing system type, you can either load files from the AFS CD-ROM or use a remote file transfer protocol to copy files from an existing server machine of the same system type. To load from the CD-ROM, see the instructions just following for a machine of a new system type. If using a remote file transfer protocol, copy the complete contents of the existing client machine's /usr/vice/etc directory.
+
+\* On a machine of a new system type, you must use the following instructions to copy files from the AFS CD-ROM.
+
+1. 1. 1. 1. 1. On the local /cdrom directory, mount the AFS CD-ROM for this machine's system type, if it is not already. For instructions on mounting CD-ROMs (either locally or remotely via NFS), consult the operating system documentation.
+
+1. 1. 1. 1. 1. Copy files to the local /usr/vice/etc directory.
+
+This step places a copy of the AFS initialization script (and related files, if applicable) into the /usr/vice/etc directory. In the preceding instructions for incorporating AFS into the kernel, you copied the script directly to the operating system's conventional location for initialization files. When you incorporate AFS into the machine's startup sequence in a later step, you can choose to link the two files.
+
+On some system types that use a dynamic kernel loader program, you previously copied AFS library files into a subdirectory of the /usr/vice/etc directory. On other system types, you copied the appropriate AFS library file directly to the directory where the operating system accesses it. The following commands do not copy or recopy the AFS library files into the /usr/vice/etc directory, because on some system types the library files consume a large amount of space. If you want to copy them, add the -r flag to the first cp command and skip the second cp command.
+
+       # cd /cdrom/<sys_version>/dest/root.client/usr/vice/etc
+
+       # cp -p  *  /usr/vice/etc
+
+       # cp -rp  C  /usr/vice/etc
+
+1. Change to the /usr/vice/etc directory and create the [[ThisCell]] file as a copy of the /usr/afs/etc/ThisCell file. You must first remove the symbolic link to the /usr/afs/etc/ThisCell file that the BOS Server created automatically in Starting Server Programs.
+
+       # cd  /usr/vice/etc
+
+       # rm  ThisCell
+
+       # cp  /usr/afs/etc/ThisCell  ThisCell
+
+1. Remove the symbolic link to the /usr/afs/etc/CellServDB file.
+
+       # rm  CellServDB
+
+1. Create the /usr/vice/etc/CellServDB file. Use a network file transfer program such as ftp or NFS to copy it from one of the following sources, which are listed in decreasing order of preference:
+
+\* Your cell's central [[CellServDB]] source file (the conventional location is /afs/cellname/common/etc/CellServDB)
+
+\* The global [[CellServDB]] file maintained by the AFS Product Support group
+
+\* An existing client machine in your cell
+
+\* The [[CellServDB]].sample file included in the sysname/root.client/usr/vice/etc directory of each AFS CD-ROM; add an entry for the local cell by following the instructions in [[Creating the Client CellServDB File|Main/CreatingTheClientCellServDBFile]]
+
+1. Create the cacheinfo file for either a disk cache or a memory cache. [[Configuring the Cache|Main/ConfiguringTheCache]]
+
+1. Proceed to [[Configuring the CacheManager|Main/ConfiguringTheCacheManager]]
+
+1. If appropriate, follow the instructions in Storing AFS Binaries in AFS to copy the AFS binaries for this system type into an AFS volume. See the introduction to this section for further discussion.
+
+# <a name="Completing the Installation"></a> Completing the Installation
+
+At this point you run the machine's AFS initialization script to verify that it correctly loads AFS modifications into the kernel and starts the BOS Server, which starts the other server processes. If you have installed client files, the script also starts the Cache Manager. If the script works correctly, perform the steps that incorporate it into the machine's startup and shutdown sequence. If there are problems during the initialization, attempt to resolve them. The AFS Product Support group can provide assistance if necessary.
+
+If the machine is configured as a client using a disk cache, it can take a while for the afsd program to create all of the Vn files in the cache directory. Messages on the console trace the initialization process.
+
+1. Issue the bos shutdown command to shut down the AFS server processes other than the BOS Server. Include the -wait flag to delay return of the command shell prompt until all processes shut down completely.
+
+       # /usr/afs/bin/bos shutdown <machine name> -wait -noauth
+
+1. Issue the ps command to learn the BOS Server's process ID number (PID), and then the kill command to stop the bosserver process.
+
+       # ps appropriate_ps_options | grep bosserver
+
+       # kill bosserver_PID
+
+1. Run the AFS initialization script by issuing the appropriate commands for this system type.
+
+## <a name="On AIX systems:"></a> On AIX systems:
+
+[[Initialization Script on AIX|Main/InitializationScriptOnAIX]]
+
+Proceed to Step 4.
+
+## <a name="On Digital UNIX systems:"></a> On Digital UNIX systems:
+
+[[Initialization Script on Digital UNIX|Main/InitializationScriptOnDigitalUNIX]]
+
+Proceed to Step 4.
+
+## <a name="On HP-UX systems:"></a> On HP-UX systems:
+
+[[Initialization Script on HP-UX|Main/InitializationScriptOnHP-UX]]
+
+Proceed to Step 4.
+
+## <a name="On IRIX systems:"></a> On IRIX systems:
+
+[[Initialization Script on IRIX|Main/InitializationScriptOnIRIX]]
+
+Proceed to Step 4.
+
+## <a name="On Linux systems:"></a> On Linux systems:
+
+[[Initialization Script on Linux|Main/InitializationScriptOnLinux]]
+
+Proceed to Step 4.
+
+## <a name="On Solaris systems:"></a> On Solaris systems:
+
+[[Initialization Script on Solaris|Main/InitializationScriptOnSolaris]]
+
+Step 4. Verify that /usr/afs and its subdirectories on the new file server machine meet the ownership and mode bit requirements outlined in Protecting Sensitive AFS Directories. If necessary, use the chmod command to correct the mode bits.
+
+1. To configure this machine as a database server machine, proceed to Installing Database Server Functionality.
+
+# <a name="Installing Database Server Funct"></a> Installing Database Server Functionality
+
+This section explains how to install database server functionality. Database server machines have two defining characteristics. First, they run the Authentication Server, Protection Server, and Volume Location (VL) Server processes. They also run the Backup Server if the cell uses the AFS Backup System, as is assumed in these instructions. Second, they appear in the [[CellServDB]] file of every machine in the cell (and of client machines in foreign cells, if they are to access files in this cell).
+
+Note the following requirements for database server machines.
+
+\* In the conventional configuration, database server machines also serve as file server machines (run the File Server, Volume Server and Salvager processes). If you choose not to run file server functionality on a database server machine, then the kernel does not have to incorporate AFS modifications, but the local /usr/afs directory must house most of the standard files and subdirectories. In particular, the /usr/afs/etc/KeyFile file must contain the same keys as all other server machines in the cell. If you run a system control machine, run the upclientetc process on every database server machine other than the system control machine; if you do not run a system control machine, use the bos addkey command as instructed in the chapter in the IBM AFS Administration Guide about maintaining server encryption keys.
+
+The instructions in this section assume that the machine on which you are installing database server functionality is already a file server machine. Contact the AFS Product Support group to learn how to install database server functionality on a non-file server machine.
+
+\* During the installation of database server functionality, you must restart all of the database server machines to force the election of a new Ubik coordinator (synchronization site) for each database server process. This can cause a system outage, which usually lasts less than 5 minutes.
+
+\* Updating the kernel memory list of database server machines on each client machine is generally the most time-consuming part of installing a new database server machine. It is, however, crucial for correct functioning in your cell. Incorrect knowledge of your cell's database server machines can prevent your users from authenticating, accessing files, and issuing AFS commands.
+
+You update a client's kernel memory list by changing the /usr/vice/etc/CellServDB file and then either rebooting or issuing the fs newcell command. For instructions, see the chapter in the IBM AFS Administration Guide about administering client machines.
+
+The point at which you update your clients' knowledge of database server machines depends on which of the database server machines has the lowest IP address. The following instructions indicate the appropriate place to update your client machines in either case.
+
+o If the new database server machine has a lower IP address than any existing database server machine, update the [[CellServDB]] file on every client machine before restarting the database server processes. If you do not, users can become unable to update (write to) any of the AFS databases. This is because the machine with the lowest IP address is usually elected as the Ubik coordinator, and only the Coordinator accepts database writes. On client machines that do not have the new list of database server machines, the Cache Manager cannot locate the new coordinator. (Be aware that if clients contact the new coordinator before it is actually in service, they experience a timeout before contacting another database server machine. This is a minor, and temporary, problem compared to being unable to write to the database.)
+
+o If the new database server machine does not have the lowest IP address of any database server machine, then it is better to update clients after restarting the database server processes. Client machines do not start using the new database server machine until you update their kernel memory list, but that does not usually cause timeouts or update problems (because the new machine is not likely to become the coordinator).
+
+## <a name="Summary of Procedures"></a> Summary of Procedures
+
+To install a database server machine, perform the following procedures.
+
+1. Install the bos suite of commands locally, as a precaution
+
+1. Add the new machine to the /usr/afs/etc/CellServDB file on existing file server machines
+
+1. Update your cell's central [[CellServDB]] source file and the file you make available to foreign cells
+
+1. Update every client machine's /usr/vice/etc/CellServDB file and kernel memory list of database server machines
+
+1. Start the database server processes (Authentication Server, Backup Server, Protection Server, and Volume Location Server)
+
+1. Restart the database server processes on every database server machine
+
+1. Notify the AFS Product Support group that you have installed a new database server machine
+
+## <a name="Instructions"></a> Instructions
+
+Note: It is assumed that your PATH environment variable includes the directory that houses the AFS command binaries. If not, you possibly need to precede the command names with the appropriate pathname.
+
+1. You can perform the following instructions on either a server or client machine. Login as an AFS administrator who is listed in the /usr/afs/etc/UserList file on all server machines.
+
+       % klog admin_user
+       Password: admin_password
+
+1. If you are working on a client machine configured in the conventional manner, the bos command suite resides in the /usr/afsws/bin directory, a symbolic link to an AFS directory. An error during installation can potentially block access to AFS, in which case it is helpful to have a copy of the bos binary on the local disk. This step is not necessary if you are working on a server machine, where the binary resides in the local /usr/afs/bin directory.
+
+       % cp  /usr/afsws/bin/bos   /tmp
+
+1. Issue the bos addhost command to add the new database server machine to the /usr/afs/etc/CellServDB file on existing server machines (as well as the new database server machine itself).
+
+Substitute the new database server machine's fully-qualified hostname for the host name argument. If you run a system control machine, substitute its fully-qualified hostname for the machine name argument. If you do not run a system control machine, repeat the bos addhost command once for each server machine in your cell (including the new database server machine itself), by substituting each one's fully-qualified hostname for the machine name argument in turn.
+
+       % bos addhost <machine name>  <host name>
+
+If you run a system control machine, wait for the Update Server to distribute the new [[CellServDB]] file, which takes up to five minutes by default. If you are issuing individual bos addhost commands, attempt to issue all of them within five minutes.
+
+<dl>
+  <dd>
+    <dl>
+      <dt> Note</dt>
+      <dd> It is best to maintain a one-to-one mapping between hostnames and IP addresses on a multihomed database server machine (the conventional configuration for any AFS machine). The BOS Server uses the gethostbyname( ) routine to obtain the IP address associated with the host name argument. If there is more than one address, the BOS Server records in the [[Main/CellServDB]] entry the one that appears first in the list of addresses returned by the routine. The routine possibly returns addresses in a different order on different machines, which can create inconsistency. </dd>
+    </dl>
+  </dd>
+</dl>
+
+1. (Optional) Issue the bos listhosts command on each server machine to verify that the new database server machine appears in its [[CellServDB]] file.
+
+       % bos listhosts <machine name>
+
+1. Add the new database server machine to your cell's central [[CellServDB]] source file, if you use one. The standard location is /afs/cellname/common/etc/CellServDB.
+
+If you are willing to make your cell accessible to users in foreign cells, add the new database server machine to the file that lists your cell's database server machines. The conventional location is /afs/cellname/service/etc/CellServDB.local.
+
+1. If this machine's IP address is lower than any existing database server machine's, update every client machine's /usr/vice/etc/CellServDB file and kernel memory list to include this machine. (If this machine's IP address is not the lowest, it is acceptable to wait until Step 12.)
+
+There are several ways to update the [[CellServDB]] file on client machines, as detailed in the chapter of the IBM AFS Administration Guide about administering client machines. One option is to copy over the central update source (which you updated in Step 5), with or without using the package program. To update the machine's kernel memory list, you can either reboot after changing the [[CellServDB]] file or issue the fs newcell command.
+
+1. Start the Authentication Server (the kaserver process).
+
+       % bos create <machine name> kaserver simple /usr/afs/bin/kaserver
+
+1. Start the Backup Server (the buserver process). You must perform other configuration procedures before actually using the AFS Backup System, as detailed in the IBM AFS Administration Guide.
+
+       % bos create <machine name> buserver simple /usr/afs/bin/buserver
+
+1. Start the Protection Server (the ptserver process).
+
+       % bos create <machine name> ptserver simple /usr/afs/bin/ptserver
+
+10. Start the Volume Location (VL) Server (the vlserver process).
+
+       % bos create <machine name> vlserver simple /usr/afs/bin/vlserver
+
+11. Issue the bos restart command on every database server machine in the cell, including the new machine. The command restarts the Authentication, Backup, Protection, and VL Servers, which forces an election of a new Ubik coordinator for each process. The new machine votes in the election and is considered as a potential new coordinator.
+
+A cell-wide service outage is possible during the election of a new coordinator for the VL Server, but it normally lasts less than five minutes. Such an outage is particularly likely if you are installing your cell's second database server machine. Messages tracing the progress of the election appear on the console.
+
+Repeat this command on each of your cell's database server machines in quick succession. Begin with the machine with the lowest IP address.
+
+       %  bos restart <machine name> kaserver buserver ptserver vlserver
+
+If an error occurs, restart all server processes on the database server machines again by using one of the following methods:
+
+\* Issue the bos restart command with the -bosserver flag for each database server machine
+
+\* Reboot each database server machine, either using the bos exec command or at its console
+
+12. If you did not update the [[CellServDB]] file on client machines in Step 6, do so now.
+
+13. Send the new database server machine's name and IP address to the AFS Product Support group.
+
+If you wish to participate in the AFS global name space, your cell's entry appear in a [[CellServDB]] file that the AFS Product Support group makes available to all AFS sites. Otherwise, they list your cell in a private file that they do not share with other AFS sites.
+
+# <a name="Removing Database Server Functio"></a> Removing Database Server Functionality
+
+Removing database server machine functionality is nearly the reverse of installing it.
+
+## <a name="Summary of Procedures"></a> Summary of Procedures
+
+To decommission a database server machine, perform the following procedures.
+
+1. Install the bos suite of commands locally, as a precaution
+
+1. Notify the AFS Product Support group that you are decommissioning a database server machine
+
+1. Update your cell's central [[CellServDB]] source file and the file you make available to foreign cells
+
+1. Update every client machine's /usr/vice/etc/CellServDB file and kernel memory list of database server machines
+
+1. Remove the machine from the /usr/afs/etc/CellServDB file on file server machines
+
+1. Stop the database server processes and remove them from the /usr/afs/local/BosConfig file if desired
+
+1. Restart the database server processes on the remaining database server machines
+
+## <a name="Instructions"></a> Instructions
+
+Note: It is assumed that your PATH environment variable includes the directory that houses the AFS command binaries. If not, you possibly need to precede the command names with the appropriate pathname.
+
+1. You can perform the following instructions on either a server or client machine. Login as an AFS administrator who is listed in the /usr/afs/etc/UserList file on all server machines.
+
+       % klog admin_user
+       Password: admin_password
+
+1. If you are working on a client machine configured in the conventional manner, the bos command suite resides in the /usr/afsws/bin directory, a symbolic link to an AFS directory. An error during installation can potentially block access to AFS, in which case it is helpful to have a copy of the bos binary on the local disk. This step is not necessary if you are working on a server machine, where the binary resides in the local /usr/afs/bin directory.
+
+       % cp  /usr/afsws/bin/bos   /tmp
+
+1. Send the revised list of your cell's database server machines to the AFS Product Support group.
+
+This step is particularly important if your cell is included in the global [[CellServDB]] file. If the administrators in foreign cells do not learn about the change in your cell, they cannot update the [[CellServDB]] file on their client machines. Users in foreign cells continue to send database requests to the decommissioned machine, which creates needless network traffic and activity on the machine. Also, the users experience time-out delays while their request is forwarded to a valid database server machine.
+
+1. Remove the decommissioned machine from your cell's central [[CellServDB]] source file, if you use one. The conventional location is /afs/cellname/common/etc/CellServDB.
+
+If you maintain a file that users in foreign cells can access to learn about your cell's database server machines, update it also. The conventional location is /afs/cellname/service/etc/CellServDB.local.
+
+1. Update every client machine's /usr/vice/etc/CellServDB file and kernel memory list to exclude this machine. Altering the [[CellServDB]] file and kernel memory list before stopping the actual database server processes avoids possible time-out delays that result when users send requests to a decommissioned database server machine that is still listed in the file.
+
+There are several ways to update the [[CellServDB]] file on client machines, as detailed in the chapter of the IBM AFS Administration Guide about administering client machines. One option is to copy over the central update source (which you updated in Step 5), with or without using the package program. To update the machine's kernel memory list, you can either reboot after changing the [[CellServDB]] file or issue the fs newcell command.
+
+1. Issue the bos removehost command to remove the decommissioned database server machine from the /usr/afs/etc/CellServDB file on server machines.
+
+Substitute the decommissioned database server machine's fully-qualified hostname for the host name argument. If you run a system control machine, substitute its fully-qualified hostname for the machine name argument. If you do not run a system control machine, repeat the bos removehost command once for each server machine in your cell (including the decommissioned database server machine itself), by substituting each one's fully-qualified hostname for the machine name argument in turn.
+
+       % bos removehost <machine name>  <host name>
+
+If you run a system control machine, wait for the Update Server to distribute the new [[CellServDB]] file, which takes up to five minutes by default. If issuing individual bos removehost commands, attempt to issue all of them within five minutes.
+
+1. (Optional) Issue the bos listhosts command on each server machine to verify that the decommissioned database server machine no longer appears in its [[CellServDB]] file.
+
+       % bos listhosts <machine name>
+
+1. Issue the bos stop command to stop the database server processes on the machine, by substituting its fully-qualified hostname for the machine name argument. The command changes each process's status in the /usr/afs/local/BosConfig file to [[NotRun]], but does not remove its entry from the file.
+
+       % bos stop <machine name> kaserver buserver ptserver vlserver
+
+1. (Optional) Issue the bos delete command to remove the entries for database server processes from the [[BosConfig]] file. This step is unnecessary if you plan to restart the database server functionality on this machine in future.
+
+       % bos delete <machine name> kaserver buserver ptserver vlserver
+
+10. Issue the bos restart command on every database server machine in the cell, to restart the Authentication, Backup, Protection, and VL Servers. This forces the election of a Ubik coordinator for each process, ensuring that the remaining database server processes recognize that the machine is no longer a database server.
+
+A cell-wide service outage is possible during the election of a new coordinator for the VL Server, but it normally lasts less than five minutes. Messages tracing the progress of the election appear on the console.
+
+Repeat this command on each of your cell's database server machines in quick succession. Begin with the machine with the lowest IP address.
+
+       %  bos restart <machine name> kaserver buserver ptserver vlserver
+
+If an error occurs, restart all server processes on the database server machines again by using one of the following methods:
+
+\* Issue the bos restart command with the -bosserver flag for each database server machine
+
+\* Reboot each database server machine, either using the bos exec command or at its console
+
+Copyright IBM Corporation 2000. All Rights Reserved
index b1b5738..ea7ebdf 100644 (file)
@@ -3,6 +3,79 @@
     <li><a href="#Installing the First AFS Machine"> Installing the First AFS Machine</a></li>
     <li><a href="#Overview: Installing Server Func"> Overview: Installing Server Functionality</a></li>
     <li><a href="#Choosing the First AFS Machine"> Choosing the First AFS Machine</a></li>
+    <li><a href="#Performing Platform-Specific Pro"> Performing Platform-Specific Procedures</a></li>
+    <li><a href="#Getting Started on AIX Systems"> Getting Started on AIX Systems</a><ul>
+        <li><a href="#Loading AFS into the AIX Kernel"> Loading AFS into the AIX Kernel</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Replacing the fsck Program Helpe"> Replacing the fsck Program Helper on AIX Systems</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Configuring Server Volumes on AI"> Configuring Server Volumes on AIX Systems</a></li>
+      </ul>
+    </li>
+    <li><a href="#Getting Started on Digital UNIX"> Getting Started on Digital UNIX Systems</a><ul>
+        <li><a href="#Loading AFS into the Digital UNI">Loading AFS into the Digital UNIX Kernel</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Replacing the fsck Program on Di"> Replacing the fsck Program on Digital UNIX Systems</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Configuring Server Volumes on Di"> Configuring Server Volumes on Digital UNIX Systems</a></li>
+      </ul>
+    </li>
+    <li><a href="#Getting Started on HP-UX Systems"> Getting Started on HP-UX Systems</a><ul>
+        <li><a href="#Building AFS into the HP-UX Kern"> Building AFS into the HP-UX Kernel</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Configuring the AFS-modified fsc"> Configuring the AFS-modified fsck Program on HP-UX Systems</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Configuring Server Volumes on HP"> Configuring Server Volumes on HP-UX Systems</a></li>
+      </ul>
+    </li>
+    <li><a href="#Getting Started on IRIX Systems"> Getting Started on IRIX Systems</a><ul>
+        <li><a href="#Loading AFS into the IRIX Kernel"> Loading AFS into the IRIX Kernel</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Configuring Server Volumes on IR"> Configuring Server Volumes on IRIX Systems</a></li>
+      </ul>
+    </li>
+    <li><a href="#Getting Started on Linux Systems"> Getting Started on Linux Systems</a><ul>
+        <li><a href="#Loading AFS into the Linux Kerne"> Loading AFS into the Linux Kernel</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Configuring Server Volumes on Li"> Configuring Server Volumes on Linux Systems</a></li>
+      </ul>
+    </li>
+    <li><a href="#Getting Started on Solaris Syste"> Getting Started on Solaris Systems</a><ul>
+        <li><a href="#Loading AFS into the Solaris Ker"> Loading AFS into the Solaris Kernel</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Configuring the AFS-modified fsc"> Configuring the AFS-modified fsck Program on Solaris Systems</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Configuring Server Partitions on"> Configuring Server Partitions on Solaris Systems</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Enabling AFS Login on Solaris Sy"> Enabling AFS Login on Solaris Systems</a></li>
+      </ul>
+    </li>
+    <li><a href="#Starting the BOS Server"> Starting the BOS Server</a></li>
+    <li><a href="#Defining Cell Name and Membershi"> Defining Cell Name and Membership for Server Processes</a></li>
+    <li><a href="#Starting the Database Server Pro"> Starting the Database Server Processes</a></li>
+    <li><a href="#Initializing Cell Security"> Initializing Cell Security</a></li>
+    <li><a href="#Starting the File Server, Volume"> Starting the File Server, Volume Server, and Salvager</a></li>
+    <li><a href="#Starting the Server Portion of t"> Starting the Server Portion of the Update Server</a></li>
+    <li><a href="#Starting the Controller for NTPD"> Starting the Controller for NTPD</a></li>
+    <li><a href="#Overview: Installing Client Func"> Overview: Installing Client Functionality</a><ul>
+        <li><a href="#Copying Client Files to the Loca"> Copying Client Files to the Local Disk</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Defining Cell Membership for Cli"> Defining Cell Membership for Client Processes</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Creating the Client _CellServDB"> Creating the Client CellServDB File</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Configuring the Cache"> Configuring the Cache</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Configuring the Cache Manager"> Configuring the Cache Manager</a></li>
+      </ul>
+    </li>
+    <li><a href="#Overview: Completing the Install"> Overview: Completing the Installation of the First AFS Machine</a><ul>
+        <li><a href="#Verifying the AFS Initialization"> Verifying the AFS Initialization Script</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#On AIX systems:"> On AIX systems:</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#On Digital UNIX systems:"> On Digital UNIX systems:</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#On HP-UX systems:"> On HP-UX systems:</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#On IRIX systems:"> On IRIX systems:</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#On Linux systems:"> On Linux systems:</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#On Solaris systems:"> On Solaris systems:</a></li>
+      </ul>
+    </li>
+    <li><a href="#Configuring the Top Levels of th"> Configuring the Top Levels of the AFS Filespace</a></li>
+    <li><a href="#Storing AFS Binaries in AFS"> Storing AFS Binaries in AFS</a></li>
+    <li><a href="#The AFS distribution includes th"> The AFS distribution includes the following documents:</a></li>
+    <li><a href="#Storing System Binaries in AFS"> Storing System Binaries in AFS</a></li>
+    <li><a href="#Enabling Access to Foreign Cells"> Enabling Access to Foreign Cells</a></li>
+    <li><a href="#Improving Cell Security"> Improving Cell Security</a></li>
+    <li><a href="#Controlling root Access"> Controlling root Access</a><ul>
+        <li><a href="#Controlling System Administrator"> Controlling System Administrator Access</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Protecting Sensitive AFS Directo"> Protecting Sensitive AFS Directories</a></li>
+      </ul>
+    </li>
+    <li><a href="#Removing Client Functionality"> Removing Client Functionality</a></li>
   </ul>
 </div>
 
@@ -89,3 +162,999 @@ Create the /usr/afs and /usr/vice/etc directories on the local disk, to house se
        # mkdir -p /usr/vice/etc
 
        # mkdir /cdrom
+
+# <a name="Performing Platform-Specific Pro"></a> Performing Platform-Specific Procedures
+
+Several of the initial procedures for installing a file server machine differ for each system type. For convenience, the following sections group them together for each system type:
+
+- Incorporate AFS modifications into the kernel.
+
+The kernel on every AFS file server and client machine must incorporate AFS extensions. On machines that use a dynamic kernel module loader, it is conventional to alter the machine's initialization script to load the AFS extensions at each reboot.
+
+- Configure server partitions or logical volumes to house AFS volumes.
+
+Every AFS file server machine must have at least one partition or logical volume dedicated to storing AFS volumes (for convenience, the documentation hereafter refers to partitions only). Each server partition is mounted at a directory named /vicepxx, where xx is one or two lowercase letters. By convention, the first 26 partitions are mounted on the directories called /vicepa through /vicepz, the 27th one is mounted on the /vicepaa directory, and so on through /vicepaz and /vicepba, continuing up to the index corresponding to the maximum number of server partitions supported in the current version of AFS (which is specified in the IBM AFS Release Notes).
+
+The /vicepxx directories must reside in the file server machine's root directory, not in one of its subdirectories (for example, /usr/vicepa is not an acceptable directory location).
+
+You can also add or remove server partitions on an existing file server machine. For instructions, see the chapter in the IBM AFS Administration Guide about maintaining server machines.
+
+<dl>
+  <dd>
+    <dl>
+      <dt> Note</dt>
+      <dd> Not all file system types supported by an operating system are necessarily supported as AFS server partitions. For possible restrictions, see the IBM AFS Release Notes. </dd>
+    </dl>
+  </dd>
+</dl>
+
+- On some system types, install and configure a modified fsck program which recognizes the structures that the File Server uses to organize volume data on AFS server partitions. The fsck program provided with the operating system does not understand the AFS data structures, and so removes them to the lost+found directory.
+
+- If the machine is to remain an AFS client machine, modify the machine's authentication system so that users obtain an AFS token as they log into the local file system. Using AFS is simpler and more convenient for your users if you make the modifications on all client machines. Otherwise, users must perform a two-step login procedure (login to the local file system and then issue the klog command). For further discussion of AFS authentication, see the chapter in the IBM AFS Administration Guide about cell configuration and administration issues.
+
+# <a name="Getting Started on AIX Systems"></a> Getting Started on AIX Systems
+
+Begin by running the AFS initialization script to call the AIX kernel extension facility, which dynamically loads AFS modifications into the kernel. Then use the SMIT program to configure partitions for storing AFS volumes, and replace the AIX fsck program helper with a version that correctly handles AFS volumes. If the machine is to remain an AFS client machine, incorporate AFS into the AIX secondary authentication system.
+
+## <a name="Loading AFS into the AIX Kernel"></a> Loading AFS into the AIX Kernel
+
+[[Loading AFS into the AIX Kernel|Main/LoadingAFSIntoTheAIXKernel]]
+
+## <a name="Replacing the fsck Program Helpe"></a> Replacing the fsck Program Helper on AIX Systems
+
+Never run the standard fsck program on AFS server partitions. It discards AFS volumes.
+
+[[Replacing the fsck Program Helper on AIX Systems|Main/ReplacingTheFsckProgramHelperOnAIXSystems]]
+
+## <a name="Configuring Server Volumes on AI"></a> Configuring Server Volumes on AIX Systems
+
+If this system is going to be used as a file server to share some of its disk space, create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). If it is not going to be a file server you can skip this step.
+
+[[Configuring Server Volumes on AIX|Main/ConfiguringServerVolumesOnAIX]]
+
+If you plan to retain client functionality on this machine after completing the installation, proceed to [[Enabling AFS Login on AIX Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnAIXSystems]]. Otherwise, proceed to Starting the BOS Server.
+
+# <a name="Getting Started on Digital UNIX"></a><a name="Getting Started on Digital UNIX "></a> Getting Started on Digital UNIX Systems
+
+Begin by either building AFS modifications into a new static kernel or by setting up to dynamically load the AFS kernel module. Then create partitions for storing AFS volumes, and replace the Digital UNIX fsck program with a version that correctly handles AFS volumes. If the machine is to remain an AFS client machine, incorporate AFS into the machine's Security Integration Architecture (SIA) matrix.
+
+## <a name="Loading AFS into the Digital UNI"></a> Loading AFS into the Digital UNIX Kernel
+
+[[Building AFS into the Digital UNIX Kernel|Main/BuildingAFSIntoTheDigitalUNIXKernel]]
+
+## <a name="Replacing the fsck Program on Di"></a> Replacing the fsck Program on Digital UNIX Systems
+
+Never run the standard fsck program on AFS server partitions. It discards AFS volumes.
+
+[[Replacing the fsck Program on Digital UNIX Systems|Main/ReplacingTheFsckProgramOnDigitalUNIXSystems]]
+
+## <a name="Configuring Server Volumes on Di"></a> Configuring Server Volumes on Digital UNIX Systems
+
+If this system is going to be used as a file server to share some of its disk space, create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). If it is not going to be a file server you can skip this step.
+
+[[Configuring Server Volumes on Digital UNIX|Main/ConfiguringServerVolumesOnDigitalUNIX]]
+
+If you plan to retain client functionality on this machine after completing the installation, proceed to [[Enabling AFS Login on Digital UNIX Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnDigitalUNIXSystems]]. Otherwise, proceed to Starting the BOS Server.
+
+# <a name="Getting Started on HP-UX Systems"></a> Getting Started on HP-UX Systems
+
+Begin by building AFS modifications into a new kernel; HP-UX does not support dynamic loading. Then create partitions for storing AFS volumes, and install and configure the AFS-modified fsck program to run on AFS server partitions. If the machine is to remain an AFS client machine, incorporate AFS into the machine's Pluggable Authentication Module (PAM) scheme.
+
+## <a name="Building AFS into the HP-UX Kern"></a> Building AFS into the HP-UX Kernel
+
+[[Building AFS into the HP-UX Kernel|Main/BuildingAFSIntoTheHP-UXKernel]]
+
+## <a name="Configuring the AFS-modified fsc"></a> Configuring the AFS-modified fsck Program on HP-UX Systems
+
+Never run the standard fsck program on AFS server partitions. It discards AFS volumes.
+
+[[Configuring the AFS-modified fsck Program on HP-UX Systems|Main/ConfiguringTheAFS-modifiedFsckProgramOnHP-UXSystems]]
+
+## <a name="Configuring Server Volumes on HP"></a> Configuring Server Volumes on HP-UX Systems
+
+If this system is going to be used as a file server to share some of its disk space, create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). If it is not going to be a file server you can skip this step.
+
+[[Configuring Server Volumes on HP-UX|Main/ConfiguringServerVolumesOnHP-UX]]
+
+If you plan to retain client functionality on this machine after completing the installation, proceed to [[Enabling AFS Login on HP-UX Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnHP-UXSystems]]. Otherwise, proceed to Starting the BOS Server.
+
+# <a name="Getting Started on IRIX Systems"></a> Getting Started on IRIX Systems
+
+Begin by incorporating AFS modifications into the kernel. Either use the ml dynamic loader program, or build a static kernel. Then configure partitions to house AFS volumes. AFS supports use of both EFS and XFS partitions for housing AFS volumes. SGI encourages use of XFS partitions.
+
+You do not need to replace IRIX fsck program, because the version that SGI distributes handles AFS volumes properly.
+
+## <a name="Loading AFS into the IRIX Kernel"></a> Loading AFS into the IRIX Kernel
+
+[[Loading AFS into the IRIX Kernel|Main/LoadingAFSIntoTheIRIXKernel]]
+
+Proceed to Configuring Server Partitions on IRIX Systems.
+
+## <a name="Configuring Server Volumes on IR"></a> Configuring Server Volumes on IRIX Systems
+
+If this system is going to be used as a file server to share some of its disk space, create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). If it is not going to be a file server you can skip this step.
+
+[[Configuring Server Volumes on IRIX|Main/ConfiguringServerVolumesOnIRIX]]
+
+If you plan to retain client functionality on this machine after completing the installation, proceed to [[Enabling AFS Login on IRIX Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnIRIXSystems]]. Otherwise, proceed to Starting the BOS Server.
+
+# <a name="Getting Started on Linux Systems"></a> Getting Started on Linux Systems
+
+Begin by running the AFS initialization script to call the insmod program, which dynamically loads AFS modifications into the kernel. Then create partitions for storing AFS volumes. You do not need to replace the Linux fsck program. If the machine is to remain an AFS client machine, incorporate AFS into the machine's Pluggable Authentication Module (PAM) scheme.
+
+## <a name="Loading AFS into the Linux Kerne"></a> Loading AFS into the Linux Kernel
+
+[[Loading AFS into the Linux Kernel|Main/LoadingAFSIntoTheLinuxKernel]]
+
+## <a name="Configuring Server Volumes on Li"></a> Configuring Server Volumes on Linux Systems
+
+If this system is going to be used as a file server to share some of its disk space, create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). If it is not going to be a file server you can skip this step.
+
+[[Configuring Server Volumes On Linux|Main/ConfiguringServerVolumesOnLinux]]
+
+If you plan to retain client functionality on this machine after completing the installation, proceed to [[Enabling AFS Login on Linux Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnLinuxSystems]]. Otherwise, proceed to Starting the BOS Server.
+
+# <a name="Getting Started on Solaris Syste"></a> Getting Started on Solaris Systems
+
+Begin by running the AFS initialization script to call the modload program distributed by Sun Microsystems, which dynamically loads AFS modifications into the kernel. Then create partitions for storing AFS volumes, and install and configure the AFS-modified fsck program to run on AFS server partitions. If the machine is to remain an AFS client machine, incorporate AFS into the machine's Pluggable Authentication Module (PAM) scheme.
+
+## <a name="Loading AFS into the Solaris Ker"></a> Loading AFS into the Solaris Kernel
+
+[[Loading AFS into the Solaris Kernel|Main/LoadingAFSIntoTheSolarisKernel]]
+
+## <a name="Configuring the AFS-modified fsc"></a> Configuring the AFS-modified fsck Program on Solaris Systems
+
+Never run the standard fsck program on AFS server partitions. It discards AFS volumes.
+
+[[Configuring the AFS-modified fsck Program on Solaris Systems|Main/ConfiguringTheAFS-modifiedFsckProgramOnSolarisSystems]]
+
+## <a name="Configuring Server Partitions on"></a> Configuring Server Partitions on Solaris Systems
+
+If this system is going to be used as a file server to share some of its disk space, create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). If it is not going to be a file server you can skip this step.
+
+[[Configuring Server Volumes On Solaris|Main/ConfiguringServerVolumesOnSolaris]]
+
+If you plan to retain client functionality on this machine after completing the installation, proceed to Enabling AFS Login on Solaris Systems. Otherwise, proceed to Starting the BOS Server.
+
+## <a name="Enabling AFS Login on Solaris Sy"></a> Enabling AFS Login on Solaris Systems
+
+Note: If you plan to remove client functionality from this machine after completing the installation, skip this section and proceed to Starting the BOS Server.
+
+[[Enabling AFS Login on Solaris Systems|Main/EnablingAFSLoginOnSolarisSystems]]
+
+Proceed to Starting the BOS Server (or if referring to these instructions while installing an additional file server machine, return to Starting Server Programs).
+
+# <a name="Starting the BOS Server"></a> Starting the BOS Server
+
+You are now ready to start the AFS server processes on this machine. Begin by copying the AFS server binaries from the CD-ROM to the conventional local disk location, the /usr/afs/bin directory. The following instructions also create files in other subdirectories of the /usr/afs directory.
+
+Then issue the bosserver command to initialize the Basic [[OverSeer]] (BOS) Server, which monitors and controls other AFS server processes on its server machine. Include the -noauth flag to disable authorization checking. Because you have not yet configured your cell's AFS authentication and authorization mechanisms, the BOS Server cannot perform authorization checking as it does during normal operation. In no-authorization mode, it does not verify the identity or privilege of the issuer of a bos command, and so performs any operation for anyone.
+
+Disabling authorization checking gravely compromises cell security. You must complete all subsequent steps in one uninterrupted pass and must not leave the machine unattended until you restart the BOS Server with authorization checking enabled, in Verifying the AFS Initialization Script.
+
+As it initializes for the first time, the BOS Server creates the following directories and files, setting the owner to the local superuser root and the mode bits to limit the ability to write (and in some cases, read) them. For a description of the contents and function of these directories and files, see the chapter in the IBM AFS Administration Guide about administering server machines. For further discussion of the mode bit settings, see Protecting Sensitive AFS Directories.
+
+- /usr/afs/db
+
+- /usr/afs/etc/CellServDB
+
+- /usr/afs/etc/ThisCell
+
+- /usr/afs/local
+
+- /usr/afs/logs
+
+The BOS Server also creates symbolic links called /usr/vice/etc/ThisCell and /usr/vice/etc/CellServDB to the corresponding files in the /usr/afs/etc directory. The AFS command interpreters consult the [[CellServDB]] and [[ThisCell]] files in the /usr/vice/etc directory because they generally run on client machines. On machines that are AFS servers only (as this machine currently is), the files reside only in the /usr/afs/etc directory; the links enable the command interpreters to retrieve the information they need. Later instructions for installing the client functionality replace the links with actual files.
+
+1. On the local /cdrom directory, mount the AFS CD-ROM for this machine's system type, if it is not already. For instructions on mounting CD-ROMs (either locally or remotely via NFS), consult the operating system documentation.
+
+1. Copy files from the CD-ROM to the local /usr/afs directory.
+
+       # cd /cdrom/sysname/root.server/usr/afs
+
+       # cp -rp  *  /usr/afs
+
+1. Issue the bosserver command. Include the -noauth flag to disable authorization checking.
+
+       # /usr/afs/bin/bosserver -noauth &
+
+1. Verify that the BOS Server created /usr/vice/etc/ThisCell and /usr/vice/etc/CellServDB as symbolic links to the corresponding files in the /usr/afs/etc directory.
+
+       # ls -l  /usr/vice/etc
+
+If either or both of /usr/vice/etc/ThisCell and /usr/vice/etc/CellServDB do not exist, or are not links, issue the following commands.
+
+       # cd /usr/vice/etc
+
+       # ln -s /usr/afs/etc/ThisCell
+
+       # ln -s /usr/afs/etc/CellServDB
+
+# <a name="Defining Cell Name and Membershi"></a> Defining Cell Name and Membership for Server Processes
+
+Now assign your cell's name. The chapter in the IBM AFS Administration Guide about cell configuration and administration issues discusses the important considerations, explains why changing the name is difficult, and outlines the restrictions on name format. Two of the most important restrictions are that the name cannot include uppercase letters or more than 64 characters.
+
+Use the bos setcellname command to assign the cell name. It creates two files:
+
+- /usr/afs/etc/ThisCell, which defines this machine's cell membership
+
+- /usr/afs/etc/CellServDB, which lists the cell's database server machines; the machine named on the command line is placed on the list automatically
+
+Note: In the following and every instruction in this guide, for the machine name argument substitute the fully-qualified hostname (such as fs1.abc.com) of the machine you are installing. For the cell name argument substitute your cell's complete name (such as abc.com).
+
+1. Issue the bos setcellname command to set the cell name.
+
+       # cd /usr/afs/bin
+
+       # ./bos setcellname <machine name> <cell name> -noauth
+
+Because you are not authenticated and authorization checking is disabled, the bos command interpreter possibly produces error messages about being unable to obtain tickets and running unauthenticated. You can safely ignore the messages.
+
+1. Issue the bos listhosts command to verify that the machine you are installing is now registered as the cell's first database server machine.
+
+       # ./bos listhosts <machine name> -noauth
+       Cell name is cell_name
+           Host 1 is machine_name
+
+# <a name="Starting the Database Server Pro"></a> Starting the Database Server Processes
+
+Next use the bos create command to create entries for the four database server processes in the /usr/afs/local/BosConfig file and start them running. The four processes run on database server machines only:
+
+- The Authentication Server (the kaserver process) maintains the Authentication Database
+
+- The Backup Server (the buserver process) maintains the Backup Database
+
+- The Protection Server (the ptserver process) maintains the Protection Database
+
+- The Volume Location (VL) Server (the vlserver process) maintains the Volume Location Database (VLDB)
+
+Note: AFS's authentication and authorization software is based on algorithms and other procedures known as Kerberos, as originally developed by Project Athena at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Some cells choose to replace the AFS Authentication Server and other security-related protocols with Kerberos as obtained directly from Project Athena or other sources. If you wish to do this, contact the AFS Product Support group now to learn about necessary modifications to the installation.
+
+The remaining instructions in this chapter include the -cell argument on all applicable commands. Provide the cell name you assigned in Defining Cell Name and Membership for Server Processes. If a command appears on multiple lines, it is only for legibility.
+
+1. Issue the bos create command to start the Authentication Server. The current working directory is still /usr/afs/bin.
+
+       # ./bos create <machine name> kaserver simple /usr/afs/bin/kaserver  \
+                      -cell <cell name>  -noauth
+
+You can safely ignore the messages that tell you to add Kerberos to the /etc/services file; AFS uses a default value that makes the addition unnecessary. You can also ignore messages about the failure of authentication.
+
+1. Issue the bos create command to start the Backup Server.
+
+       # ./bos create <machine name> buserver simple /usr/afs/bin/buserver  \
+                      -cell <cell name>  -noauth
+
+1. Issue the bos create command to start the Protection Server.
+
+       # ./bos create <machine name> ptserver simple /usr/afs/bin/ptserver  \
+                      -cell <cell name>  -noauth
+
+1. Issue the bos create command to start the VL Server.
+
+       # ./bos create <machine name> vlserver simple /usr/afs/bin/vlserver  \
+                      -cell <cell name>  -noauth
+
+# <a name="Initializing Cell Security"></a> Initializing Cell Security
+
+Now initialize the cell's security mechanisms. Begin by creating the following two initial entries in the Authentication Database:
+
+- A generic administrative account, called admin by convention. If you choose to assign a different name, substitute it throughout the remainder of this document.
+
+After you complete the installation of the first machine, you can continue to have all administrators use the admin account, or you can create a separate administrative account for each of them. The latter scheme implies somewhat more overhead, but provides a more informative audit trail for administrative operations.
+
+- The entry for AFS server processes, called afs. No user logs in under this identity, but the Authentication Server's Ticket Granting Service (TGS) module uses the associated key to encrypt the server tickets that it grants to AFS clients for presentation to server processes during mutual authentication. (The chapter in the IBM AFS Administration Guide about cell configuration and administration describes the role of server encryption keys in mutual authentication.)
+
+In Step 7, you also place the initial AFS server encryption key into the /usr/afs/etc/KeyFile file. The AFS server processes refer to this file to learn the server encryption key when they need to decrypt server tickets.
+
+You also issue several commands that enable the new admin user to issue privileged commands in all of the AFS suites.
+
+The following instructions do not configure all of the security mechanisms related to the AFS Backup System. See the chapter in the IBM AFS Administration Guide about configuring the Backup System.
+
+1. Enter kas interactive mode. Because the machine is in no-authorization checking mode, include the -noauth flag to suppress the Authentication Server's usual prompt for a password.
+
+       # kas  -cell <cell name> -noauth
+       ka>
+
+1. Issue the kas create command to create Authentication Database entries called admin and afs.
+
+Do not provide passwords on the command line. Instead provide them as afs\_passwd and admin\_passwd in response to the kas command interpreter's prompts as shown, so that they do not appear on the standard output stream.
+
+You need to enter the afs\_passwd string only in this step and in Step 7, so provide a value that is as long and complex as possible, preferably including numerals, punctuation characters, and both uppercase and lowercase letters. Also make the admin\_passwd as long and complex as possible, but keep in mind that administrators need to enter it often. Both passwords must be at least six characters long.
+
+       ka> create afs
+       initial_password:  afs_passwd
+       Verifying, please re-enter initial_password: afs_passwd
+
+       ka> create admin
+       initial_password: admin_passwd
+       Verifying, please re-enter initial_password: admin_passwd
+
+1. Issue the kas examine command to display the afs entry. The output includes a checksum generated by encrypting a constant with the server encryption key derived from the afs\_passwd string. In Step 8 you issue the bos listkeys command to verify that the checksum in its output matches the checksum in this output.
+
+       ka> examine afs
+       User data for afs
+        key (0) cksum is checksum . . .
+
+1. Issue the kas setfields command to turn on the ADMIN flag in the admin entry. This enables the admin user to issue privileged kas commands. Then issue the kas examine command to verify that the ADMIN flag appears in parentheses on the first line of the output, as shown in the example.
+
+       ka> setfields admin -flags admin
+
+       ka> examine admin
+       User data for admin (ADMIN) . . .
+
+1. Issue the kas quit command to leave kas interactive mode.
+
+       ka> quit
+
+1. Issue the bos adduser command to add the admin user to the /usr/afs/etc/UserList file. This enables the admin user to issue privileged bos and vos commands.
+
+       # ./bos adduser <machine name> admin -cell <cell name> -noauth
+
+1. Issue the bos addkey command to define the AFS server encryption key in the /usr/afs/etc/KeyFile file.
+
+Do not provide the password on the command line. Instead provide it as afs\_passwd in response to the bos command interpreter's prompts, as shown. Provide the same string as in Step 2.
+
+       # ./bos addkey <machine name> -kvno 0 -cell <cell name>  -noauth
+       Input key: afs_passwd
+       Retype input key: afs_passwd
+
+1. Issue the bos listkeys command to verify that the checksum for the new key in the [[KeyFile]] file is the same as the checksum for the key in the Authentication Database's afs entry, which you displayed in Step 3.
+
+       # ./bos listkeys <machine name> -cell <cell name> -noauth
+       key 0 has cksum checksum
+
+You can safely ignore any error messages indicating that bos failed to get tickets or that authentication failed.
+
+If the keys are different, issue the following commands, making sure that the afs\_passwd string is the same in each case. The checksum strings reported by the kas examine and bos listkeys commands must match; if they do not, repeat these instructions until they do, using the -kvno argument to increment the key version number each time.
+
+       # ./kas  -cell <cell name> -noauth
+
+       ka> setpassword afs -kvno 1
+       new_password: afs_passwd
+       Verifying, please re-enter initial_password: afs_passwd
+
+       ka> examine afs
+       User data for afs
+        key (1) cksum is checksum . . .
+
+       ka> quit
+
+       # ./bos addkey <machine name> -kvno 1 -cell <cell name> -noauth
+       Input key: afs_passwd
+       Retype input key: afs_passwd
+
+       # ./bos listkeys <machine name> -cell <cell name> -noauth
+       key 1 has cksum checksum
+
+1. Issue the pts createuser command to create a Protection Database entry for the admin user.
+
+By default, the Protection Server assigns AFS UID 1 (one) to the admin user, because it is the first user entry you are creating. If the local password file (/etc/passwd or equivalent) already has an entry for admin that assigns it a UNIX UID other than 1, it is best to use the -id argument to the pts createuser command to make the new AFS UID match the existing UNIX UID. Otherwise, it is best to accept the default.
+
+       # ./pts createuser -name admin -cell <cell name> [-id <AFS UID>]  -noauth
+       User admin has id AFS UID
+
+10. Issue the pts adduser command to make the admin user a member of the system:administrators group, and the pts membership command to verify the new membership. Membership in the group enables the admin user to issue privileged pts commands and some privileged fs commands.
+
+       # ./pts adduser admin system:administrators -cell <cell name> -noauth
+
+       # ./pts membership admin -cell  <cell name> -noauth
+       Groups admin (id: 1) is a member of:
+         system:administrators
+
+11. Issue the bos restart command with the -all flag to restart the database server processes, so that they start using the new server encryption key.
+
+       # ./bos restart <machine name> -all -cell <cell name> -noauth
+
+# <a name="Starting the File Server, Volume"></a> Starting the File Server, Volume Server, and Salvager
+
+Start the fs process, which consists of the File Server, Volume Server, and Salvager (fileserver, volserver and salvager processes).
+
+1. Issue the bos create command to start the fs process. The command appears here on multiple lines only for legibility.
+
+       # ./bos create  <machine name> fs fs /usr/afs/bin/fileserver   \
+                       /usr/afs/bin/volserver /usr/afs/bin/salvager  \
+                       -cell <cell name>  -noauth
+
+Sometimes a message about Volume Location Database (VLDB) initialization appears, along with one or more instances of an error message similar to the following:
+
+       FSYNC_clientInit temporary failure (will retry)
+
+This message appears when the volserver process tries to start before the fileserver process has completed its initialization. Wait a few minutes after the last such message before continuing, to guarantee that both processes have started successfully.
+
+You can verify that the fs process has started successfully by issuing the bos status command. Its output mentions two proc starts.
+
+       # ./bos status <machine name> fs -long -noauth
+
+1. Your next action depends on whether you have ever run AFS file server machines in the cell:
+
+\* If you are installing the first AFS server machine ever in the cell (that is, you are not upgrading the AFS software from a previous version), create the first AFS volume, root.afs.
+
+For the partition name argument, substitute the name of one of the machine's AFS server partitions (such as /vicepa).
+
+       # ./vos create  <machine name> <partition name> root.afs   \
+                       -cell <cell name>  -noauth
+
+The Volume Server produces a message confirming that it created the volume on the specified partition. You can ignore error messages indicating that tokens are missing, or that authentication failed.
+
+\* If there are existing AFS file server machines and volumes in the cell, issue the vos syncvldb and vos syncserv commands to synchronize the VLDB with the actual state of volumes on the local machine. To follow the progress of the synchronization operation, which can take several minutes, use the -verbose flag.
+
+       # ./vos syncvldb <machine name> -cell <cell name> -verbose  -noauth
+
+       # ./vos syncserv <machine name> -cell <cell name> -verbose  -noauth
+
+You can ignore error messages indicating that tokens are missing, or that authentication failed.
+
+# <a name="Starting the Server Portion of t"></a> Starting the Server Portion of the Update Server
+
+Start the server portion of the Update Server (the upserver process), to distribute the contents of directories on this machine to other server machines in the cell. It becomes active when you configure the client portion of the Update Server on additional server machines.
+
+Distributing the contents of its /usr/afs/etc directory makes this machine the cell's system control machine. The other server machines in the cell run the upclientetc process (an instance of the client portion of the Update Server) to retrieve the configuration files. Use the -crypt argument to the upserver initialization command to specify that the Update Server distributes the contents of the /usr/afs/etc directory only in encrypted form, as shown in the following instruction. Several of the files in the directory, particularly the [[KeyFile]] file, are crucial to cell security and so must never cross the network unencrypted.
+
+(You can choose not to configure a system control machine, in which case you must update the configuration files in each server machine's /usr/afs/etc directory individually. The bos commands used for this purpose also encrypt data before sending it across the network.)
+
+Distributing the contents of its /usr/afs/bin directory to other server machines of its system type makes this machine a binary distribution machine. The other server machines of its system type run the upclientbin process (an instance of the client portion of the Update Server) to retrieve the binaries.
+
+The binaries in the /usr/afs/bin directory are not sensitive, so it is not necessary to encrypt them before transfer across the network. Include the -clear argument to the upserver initialization command to specify that the Update Server distributes the contents of the /usr/afs/bin directory in unencrypted form unless an upclientbin process requests encrypted transfer.
+
+Note that the server and client portions of the Update Server always mutually authenticate with one another, regardless of whether you use the -clear or -crypt arguments. This protects their communications from eavesdropping to some degree.
+
+For more information on the upclient and upserver processes, see their reference pages in the IBM AFS Administration Reference. The commands appear on multiple lines here only for legibility.
+
+1. Issue the bos create command to start the upserver process.
+
+       # ./bos create  <machine name> upserver simple  \
+                 "/usr/afs/bin/upserver  -crypt /usr/afs/etc    \
+                 -clear /usr/afs/bin" -cell <cell name>  -noauth
+
+# <a name="Starting the Controller for NTPD"></a> Starting the Controller for NTPD
+
+Keeping the clocks on all server and client machines in your cell synchronized is crucial to several functions, and in particular to the correct operation of AFS's distributed database technology, Ubik. The chapter in the IBM AFS Administration Guide about administering server machines explains how time skew can disturb Ubik's performance and cause service outages in your cell.
+
+The AFS distribution includes a version of the Network Time Protocol Daemon (NTPD) for synchronizing the clocks on server machines. If a time synchronization program is not already running on the machine, then in this section you start the runntp process to configure NTPD for use with AFS. Note: Do not run the runntp process if NTPD or another time synchronization protocol is already running on the machine. Some versions of some operating systems run a time synchronization program by default, as detailed in the IBM AFS Release Notes.
+
+Attempting to run multiple instances of the NTPD causes an error. Running NTPD together with another time synchronization protocol is unnecessary and can cause instability in the clock setting.
+
+If you run the runntp process and your cell has reliable network connectivity to machines outside your cell, then it is conventional to configure the first AFS machine to refer to a time source outside the cell. When you later install the runntp program on other server machines in the cell, it configures NTPD to choose a time source at random from among the database server machines listed in the /usr/afs/etc/CellServDB file. Time synchronization therefore works in a chained manner: this database server machine refers to a time source outside the cell, the database server machines refer to the machine among them that has access to the most accurate time (NTPD itself includes code for determining this), and each non-database server machine refers to a local database server machine chosen at random from the /usr/afs/etc/CellServDB file. If you ever decide to remove database server functionality from this machine, it is best to transfer responsibility for consulting an external time source to a remaining database server machine.
+
+If your cell does not have network connectivity to external machines, or if the connectivity is not reliable, include the -localclock flag to the runntp command as indicated in the following instructions. The flag tells NTPD to rely on the machine's internal clock when all external time sources are inaccessible. The runntp command has other arguments that are possibly useful given your cell configuration; see the IBM AFS Administration Reference.
+
+Choosing an appropriate external time source is important, but involves more considerations than can be discussed here. If you need help in selecting a source, contact the AFS Product Support group.
+
+As the runntp process initializes NTPD, trace messages sometimes appear on the standard output stream. You can ignore them, but they can be informative if you understand how NTPD works.
+
+1. Issue the bos create command to start the runntp process. For the host argument, substitute the fully-qualified hostname or IP address of one or more machines outside the cell that are to serve as time sources. Separate each name with a space.
+
+\* If your cell usually has reliable network connectivity to an external time source, use the following command:
+
+       # ./bos create  <machine name>   runntp simple   \
+            "/usr/afs/bin/runntp <host>+"  -cell <cell name>  -noauth
+
+\* If your cell does not have network connectivity to an external time source, use the following command:
+
+       # ./bos create  <machine name> runntp simple  \
+            "/usr/afs/bin/runntp -localclock"  -cell <cell name>  -noauth
+
+\* If your cell has network connectivity to an external time source, but the network connection is frequently interrupted, use the following command:
+
+       # ./bos create  <machine name> runntp simple  \
+             "/usr/afs/bin/runntp -localclock <host>+"  \
+             -cell <cell name>  -noauth
+
+# <a name="Overview: Installing Client Func"></a> Overview: Installing Client Functionality
+
+The machine you are installing is now an AFS file server machine, database server machine, system control machine, and binary distribution machine. Now make it a client machine by completing the following tasks:
+
+1. Define the machine's cell membership for client processes
+
+1. Create the client version of the [[CellServDB]] file
+
+1. Define cache location and size
+
+1. Create the /afs directory and start the Cache Manager
+
+## <a name="Copying Client Files to the Loca"></a> Copying Client Files to the Local Disk
+
+Before installing and configuring the AFS client, copy the necessary files from the AFS CD-ROM to the local /usr/vice/etc directory.
+
+1. On the local /cdrom directory, mount the AFS CD-ROM for this machine's system type, if it is not already. For instructions on mounting CD-ROMs (either locally or remotely via NFS), consult the operating system documentation.
+
+1. Copy files to the local /usr/vice/etc directory.
+
+This step places a copy of the AFS initialization script (and related files, if applicable) into the /usr/vice/etc directory. In the preceding instructions for incorporating AFS into the kernel, you copied the script directly to the operating system's conventional location for initialization files. When you incorporate AFS into the machine's startup sequence in a later step, you can choose to link the two files.
+
+On some system types that use a dynamic kernel loader program, you previously copied AFS library files into a subdirectory of the /usr/vice/etc directory. On other system types, you copied the appropriate AFS library file directly to the directory where the operating system accesses it. The following commands do not copy or recopy the AFS library files into the /usr/vice/etc directory, because on some system types the library files consume a large amount of space. If you want to copy them, add the -r flag to the first cp command and skip the second cp command.
+
+       # cd /cdrom/sun4x_59/dest/root.client/usr/vice/etc
+
+       # cp -p  *  /usr/vice/etc
+
+       # cp -rp  C  /usr/vice/etc
+
+## <a name="Defining Cell Membership for Cli"></a> Defining Cell Membership for Client Processes
+
+Every AFS client machine has a copy of the /usr/vice/etc/ThisCell file on its local disk to define the machine's cell membership for the AFS client programs that run on it. The [[ThisCell]] file you created in the /usr/afs/etc directory (in Defining Cell Name and Membership for Server Processes) is used only by server processes.
+
+Among other functions, the [[ThisCell]] file on a client machine determines the following:
+
+\* The cell in which users authenticate when they log onto the machine, assuming it is using an AFS-modified login utility
+
+\* The cell in which users authenticate by default when they issue the klog command
+
+\* The cell membership of the AFS server processes that the AFS command interpreters on this machine contact by default
+
+1. Change to the /usr/vice/etc directory and remove the symbolic link created in Starting the BOS Server.
+
+       # cd /usr/vice/etc
+
+       # rm ThisCell
+
+1. Create the [[ThisCell]] file as a copy of the /usr/afs/etc/ThisCell file. Defining the same local cell for both server and client processes leads to the most consistent AFS performance.
+
+       # cp  /usr/afs/etc/ThisCell  ThisCell
+
+## <a name="Creating the Client _CellServDB"></a><a name="Creating the Client _CellServDB "></a> Creating the Client [[CellServDB]] File
+
+[[Creating the Client CellServDB File|Main/CreatingTheClientCellServDBFile]]
+
+## <a name="Configuring the Cache"></a> Configuring the Cache
+
+[[Configuring the Cache|Main/ConfiguringTheCache]]
+
+## <a name="Configuring the Cache Manager"></a> Configuring the Cache Manager
+
+[[Configuring the Cache Manager|Main/ConfiguringTheCacheManager]]
+
+# <a name="Overview: Completing the Install"></a> Overview: Completing the Installation of the First AFS Machine
+
+The machine is now configured as an AFS file server and client machine. In this final phase of the installation, you initialize the Cache Manager and then create the upper levels of your AFS filespace, among other procedures. The procedures are:
+
+1. Verify that the initialization script works correctly, and incorporate it into the operating system's startup and shutdown sequence
+
+1. Create and mount top-level volumes
+
+1. Create and mount volumes to store system binaries in AFS
+
+1. Enable access to foreign cells
+
+1. Institute additional security measures
+
+1. Remove client functionality if desired
+
+## <a name="Verifying the AFS Initialization"></a> Verifying the AFS Initialization Script
+
+At this point you run the AFS initialization script to verify that it correctly invokes all of the necessary programs and AFS processes, and that they start correctly. The following are the relevant commands:
+
+\* The command that dynamically loads AFS modifications into the kernel, on some system types (not applicable if the kernel has AFS modifications built in)
+
+\* The bosserver command, which starts the BOS Server; it in turn starts the server processes for which you created entries in the /usr/afs/local/BosConfig file
+
+\* The afsd command, which initializes the Cache Manager
+
+On system types that use a dynamic loader program, you must reboot the machine before running the initialization script, so that it can freshly load AFS modifications into the kernel.
+
+If there are problems during the initialization, attempt to resolve them. The AFS Product Support group can provide assistance if necessary.
+
+1. Issue the bos shutdown command to shut down the AFS server processes other than the BOS Server. Include the -wait flag to delay return of the command shell prompt until all processes shut down completely.
+
+       # /usr/afs/bin/bos shutdown <machine name> -wait
+
+1. Issue the ps command to learn the bosserver process's process ID number (PID), and then the kill command to stop it.
+
+       # ps appropriate_ps_options | grep bosserver
+
+       # kill bosserver_PID
+
+1. Issue the appropriate commands to run the AFS initialization script for this system type.
+
+## <a name="On AIX systems:"></a> On AIX systems:
+
+[[Initialization Script on AIX|Main/InitializationScriptOnAIX]]
+
+Proceed to Step 4.
+
+## <a name="On Digital UNIX systems:"></a> On Digital UNIX systems:
+
+[[Initialization Script on Digital UNIX|Main/InitializationScriptOnDigitalUNIX]]
+
+Proceed to Step 4.
+
+## <a name="On HP-UX systems:"></a> On HP-UX systems:
+
+[[Initialization Script on HP-UX|Main/InitializationScriptOnHP-UX]]
+
+Proceed to Step 4.
+
+## <a name="On IRIX systems:"></a> On IRIX systems:
+
+[[Initialization Script on IRIX|Main/InitializationScriptOnIRIX]]
+
+Proceed to Step 4.
+
+## <a name="On Linux systems:"></a> On Linux systems:
+
+[[Initialization Script on Linux|Main/InitializationScriptOnLinux]]
+
+Proceed to Step 4.
+
+## <a name="On Solaris systems:"></a> On Solaris systems:
+
+[[Initialization Script on Solaris|Main/InitializationScriptOnSolaris]]
+
+Step 4. Verify that /usr/afs and its subdirectories on the new file server machine meet the ownership and mode bit requirements outlined in Protecting Sensitive AFS Directories. If necessary, use the chmod command to correct the mode bits.
+
+Proceed to Configuring the Top Levels of the AFS Filespace.
+
+# <a name="Configuring the Top Levels of th"></a> Configuring the Top Levels of the AFS Filespace
+
+If you have not previously run AFS in your cell, you now configure the top levels of your cell's AFS filespace. If you have run a previous version of AFS, the filespace is already configured. Proceed to Storing AFS Binaries in AFS.
+
+You created the root.afs volume in Starting the File Server, Volume Server, and Salvager, and the Cache Manager mounted it automatically on the local /afs directory when you ran the AFS initialization script in Verifying the AFS Initialization Script. You now set the access control list (ACL) on the /afs directory; creating, mounting, and setting the ACL are the three steps required when creating any volume.
+
+After setting the ACL on the root.afs volume, you create your cell's root.cell volume, mount it as a subdirectory of the /afs directory, and set the ACL. Create both a read/write and a regular mount point for the root.cell volume. The read/write mount point enables you to access the read/write version of replicated volumes when necessary. Creating both mount points essentially creates separate read-only and read-write copies of your filespace, and enables the Cache Manager to traverse the filespace on a read-only path or read/write path as appropriate. For further discussion of these concepts, see the chapter in the IBM AFS Administration Guide about administering volumes.
+
+Then replicate both the root.afs and root.cell volumes. This is required if you want to replicate any other volumes in your cell, because all volumes mounted above a replicated volume must themselves be replicated in order for the Cache Manager to access the replica.
+
+When the root.afs volume is replicated, the Cache Manager is programmed to access its read-only version (root.afs.readonly) whenever possible. To make changes to the contents of the root.afs volume (when, for example, you mount another cell's root.cell volume at the second level in your filespace), you must mount the root.afs volume temporarily, make the changes, release the volume and remove the temporary mount point. For instructions, see Enabling Access to Foreign Cells.
+
+1. Issue the fs setacl command to edit the ACL on the /afs directory. Add an entry that grants the l (lookup) and r (read) permissions to the system:anyuser group, to enable all AFS users who can reach your cell to traverse through the directory. If you prefer to enable access only to locally authenticated users, substitute the system:authuser group.
+
+Note that there is already an ACL entry that grants all seven access rights to the system:administrators group. It is a default entry that AFS places on every new volume's root directory.
+
+       # /usr/afs/bin/fs setacl /afs system:anyuser rl
+
+1. Issue the vos create command to create the root.cell volume. Then issue the fs mkmount command to mount it as a subdirectory of the /afs directory, where it serves as the root of your cell's local AFS filespace. Finally, issue the fs setacl command to create an ACL entry for the system:anyuser group (or system:authuser group).
+
+For the partition name argument, substitute the name of one of the machine's AFS server partitions (such as /vicepa). For the cellname argument, substitute your cell's fully-qualified Internet domain name (such as abc.com).
+
+       # /usr/afs/bin/vos create  <machine name> <partition name> root.cell
+
+       # /usr/afs/bin/fs mkmount /afs/cellname  root.cell
+
+       # /usr/afs/bin/fs setacl /afs/cellname  system:anyuser rl
+
+1. (Optional) Create a symbolic link to a shortened cell name, to reduce the length of pathnames for users in the local cell. For example, in the abc.com cell, /afs/abc is a link to /afs/abc.com.
+
+       # cd /afs
+
+       # ln -s  full_cellname  short_cellname
+
+1. Issue the fs mkmount command to create a read/write mount point for the root.cell volume (you created a regular mount point in Step 2).
+
+By convention, the name of a read/write mount point begins with a period, both to distinguish it from the regular mount point and to make it visible only when the -a flag is used on the ls command.
+
+Change directory to /usr/afs/bin to make it easier to access the command binaries.
+
+       # cd /usr/afs/bin
+
+       # ./fs mkmount   /afs/.cellname   root.cell -rw
+
+1. Issue the vos addsite command to define a replication site for both the root.afs and root.cell volumes. In each case, substitute for the partition name argument the partition where the volume's read/write version resides. When you install additional file server machines, it is a good idea to create replication sites on them as well.
+
+       # ./vos addsite <machine name> <partition name> root.afs
+
+       # ./vos addsite <machine name> <partition name> root.cell
+
+1. Issue the fs examine command to verify that the Cache Manager can access both the root.afs and root.cell volumes, before you attempt to replicate them. The output lists each volume's name, volumeID number, quota, size, and the size of the partition that houses them. If you get an error message instead, do not continue before taking corrective action.
+
+       # ./fs examine /afs
+
+       # ./fs examine /afs/cellname
+
+1. Issue the vos release command to release a replica of the root.afs and root.cell volumes to the sites you defined in Step 5.
+
+       # ./vos release root.afs
+
+       # ./vos release root.cell
+
+1. Issue the fs checkvolumes to force the Cache Manager to notice that you have released read-only versions of the volumes, then issue the fs examine command again. This time its output mentions the read-only version of the volumes (root.afs.readonly and root.cell.readonly) instead of the read/write versions, because of the Cache Manager's bias to access the read-only version of the root.afs volume if it exists.
+
+       # ./fs checkvolumes
+
+       # ./fs examine /afs
+
+       # ./fs examine /afs/cellname
+
+# <a name="Storing AFS Binaries in AFS"></a> Storing AFS Binaries in AFS
+
+In the conventional configuration, you make AFS client binaries and configuration files available in the subdirectories of the /usr/afsws directory on client machines (afsws is an acronym for AFS workstation). You can conserve local disk space by creating /usr/afsws as a link to an AFS volume that houses the AFS client binaries and configuration files for this system type.
+
+In this section you create the necessary volumes. The conventional location to which to link /usr/afsws is /afs/cellname/sysname/usr/afsws, where sysname is the appropriate system type name as specified in the IBM AFS Release Notes. The instructions in Installing Additional Client Machines assume that you have followed the instructions in this section.
+
+If you have previously run AFS in the cell, the volumes possibly already exist. If so, you need to perform Step 8 only.
+
+The current working directory is still /usr/afs/bin, which houses the fs and vos command suite binaries. In the following commands, it is possible you still need to specify the pathname to the commands, depending on how your PATH environment variable is set.
+
+1. Issue the vos create command to create volumes for storing the AFS client binaries for this system type. The following example instruction creates volumes called sysname, sysname.usr, and sysname.usr.afsws. Refer to the IBM AFS Release Notes to learn the proper value of sysname for this system type.
+
+       # vos create <machine name> <partition name> sysname
+
+       # vos create <machine name> <partition name> sysname.usr
+
+       # vos create <machine name> <partition name> sysname.usr.afsws
+
+1. Issue the fs mkmount command to mount the newly created volumes. Because the root.cell volume is replicated, you must precede the cellname part of the pathname with a period to specify the read/write mount point, as shown. Then issue the vos release command to release a new replica of the root.cell volume, and the fs checkvolumes command to force the local Cache Manager to access them.
+
+       # fs mkmount -dir /afs/.cellname/sysname -vol sysname
+
+       # fs mkmount -dir /afs/.cellname/sysname/usr  -vol sysname.usr
+
+       # fs mkmount -dir /afs/.cellname/sysname/usr/afsws -vol sysname.usr.afsws
+
+       # vos release root.cell
+
+       # fs checkvolumes
+
+1. Issue the fs setacl command to grant the l (lookup) and r (read) permissions to the system:anyuser group on each new directory's ACL.
+
+       # cd /afs/.cellname/sysname
+
+       # fs setacl  -dir  .  usr  usr/afsws  -acl  system:anyuser rl
+
+1. Issue the fs setquota command to set an unlimited quota on the volume mounted at the /afs/cellname/sysname/usr/afsws directory. This enables you to copy all of the appropriate files from the CD-ROM into the volume without exceeding the volume's quota.
+
+If you wish, you can set the volume's quota to a finite value after you complete the copying operation. At that point, use the vos examine command to determine how much space the volume is occupying. Then issue the fs setquota command to set a quota that is slightly larger.
+
+       # fs setquota /afs/.cellname/sysname/usr/afsws  0
+
+1. Mount the AFS CD-ROM for this machine's system type on the local /cdrom directory, if it is not already. For instructions on mounting CD-ROMs (either locally or remotely via NFS), consult the operating system documentation.
+
+1. Copy the contents of the indicated directories from the CD-ROM into the /afs/cellname/sysname/usr/afsws directory.
+
+       # cd /afs/.cellname/sysname/usr/afsws
+
+       # cp -rp /cdrom/sysname/bin  .
+
+       # cp -rp /cdrom/sysname/etc  .
+
+       # cp -rp /cdrom/sysname/include  .
+
+       # cp -rp /cdrom/sysname/lib  .
+
+1. Issue the fs setacl command to set the ACL on each directory appropriately. To comply with the terms of your AFS License agreement, you must prevent unauthorized users from accessing AFS software. To enable access for locally authenticated users only, set the ACL on the etc, include, and lib subdirectories to grant the l and r permissions to the system:authuser group rather than the system:anyuser group. The system:anyuser group must retain the l and r permissions on the bin subdirectory to enable unauthenticated users to access the klog binary. To ensure that unauthorized users are not accessing AFS software, check periodically that the ACLs on these directories are set properly.
+
+       # cd /afs/.cellname/sysname/usr/afsws
+
+       # fs setacl  -dir etc include lib  -acl  system:authuser rl  \
+                  system:anyuser none
+
+1. Create /usr/afsws on the local disk as a symbolic link to the directory /afs/cellname/@sys/usr/afsws. You can specify the actual system name instead of @sys if you wish, but the advantage of using @sys is that it remains valid if you upgrade this machine to a different system type.
+
+       # ln -s /afs/cellname/@sys/usr/afsws  /usr/afsws
+
+1. (Optional) To enable users to issue commands from the AFS suites (such as fs) without having to specify a pathname to their binaries, include the /usr/afsws/bin and /usr/afsws/etc directories in the PATH environment variable you define in each user's shell initialization file (such as .cshrc).
+
+Storing AFS Documents in AFS
+
+# <a name="The AFS distribution includes th"></a> The AFS distribution includes the following documents:
+
+- IBM AFS Release Notes
+
+- IBM AFS Quick Beginnings
+
+- IBM AFS User Guide
+
+- IBM AFS Administration Reference
+
+- IBM AFS Administration Guide
+
+The AFS CD-ROM for each system type has a top-level Documentation directory, with a subdirectory for each document format provided. The different formats are suitable for online viewing, printing, or both.
+
+This section explains how to create and mount a volume to house the documents, making them available to your users. The recommended mount point for the volume is /afs/cellname/afsdoc. If you wish, you can create a link to the mount point on each client machine's local disk, called /usr/afsdoc. Alternatively, you can create a link to the mount point in each user's home directory. You can also choose to permit users to access only certain documents (most probably, the IBM AFS User Guide) by creating different mount points or setting different ACLs on different document directories.
+
+The current working directory is still /usr/afs/bin, which houses the fs and vos command suite binaries you use to create and mount volumes. In the following commands, it is possible you still need to specify the pathname to the commands, depending on how your PATH environment variable is set.
+
+1. Issue the vos create command to create a volume for storing the AFS documentation. Include the -maxquota argument to set an unlimited quota on the volume. This enables you to copy all of the appropriate files from the CD-ROM into the volume without exceeding the volume's quota.
+
+If you wish, you can set the volume's quota to a finite value after you complete the copying operations. At that point, use the vos examine command to determine how much space the volume is occupying. Then issue the fs setquota command to set a quota that is slightly larger.
+
+       # vos create  <machine name> <partition name>  afsdoc  -maxquota  0
+
+1. Issue the fs mkmount command to mount the new volume. Because the root.cell volume is replicated, you must precede the cellname with a period to specify the read/write mount point, as shown. Then issue the vos release command to release a new replica of the root.cell volume, and the fs checkvolumes command to force the local Cache Manager to access them.
+
+       # fs mkmount -dir /afs/.cellname/afsdoc -vol afsdoc
+
+       # vos release root.cell
+
+       # fs checkvolumes
+
+1. Issue the fs setacl command to grant the rl permissions to the system:anyuser group on the new directory's ACL.
+
+       # cd /afs/.cellname/afsdoc
+
+       # fs setacl  .  system:anyuser rl
+
+1. Mount the AFS CD-ROM for any system type on the local /cdrom directory, if one is not already. For instructions on mounting CD-ROMs (either locally or remotely via NFS), consult the operating system documentation.
+
+1. Copy the AFS documents in one or more formats from the CD-ROM into subdirectories of the /afs/cellname/afsdoc directory. Repeat the commands for each format.
+
+       # mkdir format_name
+
+       # cd format_name
+
+       # cp -rp /cdrom/Documentation/format  .
+
+If you choose to store the HTML version of the documents in AFS, note that in addition to a subdirectory for each document there are several files with a .gif extension, which enable readers to move easily between sections of a document. The file called index.htm is an introductory HTML page that contains a hyperlink to each of the documents. For online viewing to work properly, these files must remain in the top-level HTML directory (the one named, for example, /afs/cellname/afsdoc/html).
+
+1. (Optional) If you believe it is helpful to your users to access the AFS documents in a certain format via a local disk directory, create /usr/afsdoc on the local disk as a symbolic link to the documentation directory in AFS (/afs/cellname/afsdoc/format\_name).
+
+       # ln -s /afs/cellname/afsdoc/format_name /usr/afsdoc
+
+An alternative is to create a link in each user's home directory to the /afs/cellname/afsdoc/format\_name directory.
+
+# <a name="Storing System Binaries in AFS"></a> Storing System Binaries in AFS
+
+You can also choose to store other system binaries in AFS volumes, such as the standard UNIX programs conventionally located in local disk directories such as /etc, /bin, and /lib. Storing such binaries in an AFS volume not only frees local disk space, but makes it easier to update binaries on all client machines.
+
+The following is a suggested scheme for storing system binaries in AFS. It does not include instructions, but you can use the instructions in Storing AFS Binaries in AFS (which are for AFS-specific binaries) as a template.
+
+Some files must remain on the local disk for use when AFS is inaccessible (during bootup and file server or network outages). The required binaries include the following:
+
+- A text editor, network commands, and so on
+
+- Files used during the boot sequence before the afsd program runs, such as initialization and configuration files, and binaries for commands that mount file systems
+
+- Files used by dynamic kernel loader programs
+
+In most cases, it is more secure to enable only locally authenticated users to access system binaries, by granting the l (lookup) and r (read) permissions to the system:authuser group on the ACLs of directories that contain the binaries. If users need to access a binary while unauthenticated, however, the ACL on its directory must grant those permissions to the system:anyuser group.
+
+The following chart summarizes the suggested volume and mount point names for storing system binaries. It uses a separate volume for each directory. You already created a volume called sysname for this machine's system type when you followed the instructions in Storing AFS Binaries in AFS.
+
+You can name volumes in any way you wish, and mount them at other locations than those suggested here. However, this scheme has several advantages:
+
+- Volume names clearly identify volume contents
+
+- Using the sysname prefix on every volume makes it is easy to back up all of the volumes together, because the AFS Backup System enables you to define sets of volumes based on a string included in all of their names
+
+- It makes it easy to track related volumes, keeping them together on the same file server machine if desired
+
+- There is a clear relationship between volume name and mount point name
+
+    Volume Name    Mount Point
+    sysname    /afs/cellname/sysname
+    sysname.bin    /afs/cellname/sysname/bin
+    sysname.etc    /afs/cellname/sysname/etc
+    sysname.usr    /afs/cellname/sysname/usr
+    sysname.usr.afsws    /afs/cellname/sysname/usr/afsws
+    sysname.usr.bin    /afs/cellname/sysname/usr/bin
+    sysname.usr.etc    /afs/cellname/sysname/usr/etc
+    sysname.usr.inc    /afs/cellname/sysname/usr/include
+    sysname.usr.lib    /afs/cellname/sysname/usr/lib
+    sysname.usr.loc    /afs/cellname/sysname/usr/local
+    sysname.usr.man    /afs/cellname/sysname/usr/man
+    sysname.usr.sys    /afs/cellname/sysname/usr/sys
+
+# <a name="Enabling Access to Foreign Cells"></a> Enabling Access to Foreign Cells
+
+In this section you create a mount point in your AFS filespace for the root.cell volume of each foreign cell that you want to enable your users to access. For users working on a client machine to access the cell, there must in addition be an entry for it in the client machine's local /usr/vice/etc/CellServDB file. (The instructions in Creating the Client [[CellServDB]] File suggest that you use the [[CellServDB]].sample file included in the AFS distribution as the basis for your cell's client [[CellServDB]] file. The sample file lists all of the cells that had agreed to participate in the AFS global namespace at the time your AFS CD-ROM was created. As mentioned in that section, the AFS Product Support group also maintains a copy of the file, updating it as necessary.)
+
+The chapter in the IBM AFS Administration Guide about cell administration and configuration issues discusses the implications of participating in the global AFS namespace. The chapter about administering client machines explains how to maintain knowledge of foreign cells on client machines, and includes suggestions for maintaining a central version of the file in AFS.
+
+1. Issue the fs mkmount command to mount each foreign cell's root.cell volume on a directory called /afs/foreign\_cell. Because the root.afs volume is replicated, you must create a temporary mount point for its read/write version in a directory to which you have write access (such as your cell's /afs/.cellname directory). Create the mount points, issue the vos release command to release new replicas to the read-only sites for the root.afs volume, and issue the fs checkvolumes command to force the local Cache Manager to access the new replica. <dl>
+  <dt> Note</dt>
+  <dd> You need to issue the fs mkmount command only once for each foreign cell's root.cell volume. You do not need to repeat the command on each client machine. </dd>
+</dl>
+
+Substitute your cell's name for cellname.
+
+       # cd /afs/.cellname
+
+       # /usr/afs/bin/fs  mkmount  temp  root.afs
+
+Repeat the fs mkmount command for each foreign cell you wish to mount at this time.
+
+       # /usr/afs/bin/fs mkmount temp/foreign_cell root.cell -c foreign_cell
+
+Issue the following commands only once.
+
+       # /usr/afs/bin/fs rmmount temp
+
+       # /usr/afs/bin/vos release root.afs
+
+       # /usr/afs/bin/fs checkvolumes
+
+1. If this machine is going to remain an AFS client after you complete the installation, verify that the local /usr/vice/etc/CellServDB file includes an entry for each foreign cell.
+
+For each cell that does not already have an entry, complete the following instructions:
+
+1. 1. 1. Create an entry in the [[CellServDB]] file. Be sure to comply with the formatting instructions in Creating the Client [[CellServDB]] File.
+
+1. 1. 1. Issue the fs newcell command to add an entry for the cell directly to the list that the Cache Manager maintains in kernel memory. Provide each database server machine's fully qualified hostname.
+
+       # /usr/afs/bin/fs newcell <foreign_cell> <dbserver1>    \
+                [<dbserver2>] [<dbserver3>]
+
+1. 1. 1. If you plan to maintain a central version of the [[CellServDB]] file (the conventional location is /afs/cellname/common/etc/CellServDB), create it now as a copy of the local /usr/vice/etc/CellServDB file. Verify that it includes an entry for each foreign cell you want your users to be able to access.
+
+       # mkdir common
+
+       # mkdir common/etc
+
+       # cp  /usr/vice/etc/CellServDB  common/etc
+
+       # /usr/afs/bin/vos release root.cell
+
+1. Issue the ls command to verify that the new cell's mount point is visible in your filespace. The output lists the directories at the top level of the new cell's AFS filespace.
+
+       # ls /afs/foreign_cell
+
+1. Please register your cell with the AFS Product Support group at this time. If you do not want to participate in the global AFS namespace, they list your cell in a private [[CellServDB]] file that is not available to other AFS cells.
+
+# <a name="Improving Cell Security"></a> Improving Cell Security
+
+This section discusses ways to improve the security of AFS data in your cell. Also see the chapter in the IBM AFS Administration Guide about configuration and administration issues.
+
+# <a name="Controlling root Access"></a> Controlling root Access
+
+As on any machine, it is important to prevent unauthorized users from logging onto an AFS server or client machine as the local superuser root. Take care to keep the root password secret.
+
+The local root superuser does not have special access to AFS data through the Cache Manager (as members of the system:administrators group do), but it does have the following privileges:
+
+- On client machines, the ability to issue commands from the fs suite that affect AFS performance
+
+- On server machines, the ability to disable authorization checking, or to install rogue process binaries
+
+## <a name="Controlling System Administrator"></a> Controlling System Administrator Access
+
+Following are suggestions for managing AFS administrative privilege:
+
+- Create an administrative account for each administrator named something like username.admin. Administrators authenticate under these identities only when performing administrative tasks, and destroy the administrative tokens immediately after finishing the task (either by issuing the unlog command, or the klog command to adopt their regular identity).
+
+- Set a short ticket lifetime for administrator accounts (for example, 20 minutes) by using the -lifetime argument to the kas setfields command, which is described in the IBM AFS Administration Reference. Do not however, use a short lifetime for users who issue long-running backup commands.
+
+- Limit the number of system administrators in your cell, especially those who belong to the system:administrators group. By default they have all ACL rights on all directories in the local AFS filespace, and therefore must be trusted not to examine private files.
+
+- Limit the use of system administrator accounts on machines in public areas. It is especially important not to leave such machines unattended without first destroying the administrative tokens.
+
+- Limit the use by administrators of standard UNIX commands that make connections to remote machines (such as the telnet utility). Many of these programs send passwords across the network without encrypting them.
+
+## <a name="Protecting Sensitive AFS Directo"></a> Protecting Sensitive AFS Directories
+
+Some subdirectories of the /usr/afs directory contain files crucial to cell security. Unauthorized users must not read or write to these files because of the potential for misuse of the information they contain.
+
+As the BOS Server initializes for the first time on a server machine, it creates several files and directories (as mentioned in Starting the BOS Server). It sets their owner to the local superuser root and sets their mode bits to enable writing by the owner only; in some cases, it also restricts reading.
+
+At each subsequent restart, the BOS Server checks that the owner and mode bits on these files are still set appropriately. If they are not, it write the following message to the /usr/afs/logs/BosLog file:
+
+       Bosserver reports inappropriate access on server directories
+
+The BOS Server does not reset the mode bits, which enables you to set alternate values if you wish.
+
+The following charts lists the expected mode bit settings. A question mark indicates that the BOS Server does not check that mode bit.
+
+    /usr/afs    drwxr?xr-x
+    /usr/afs/backup    drwx???---
+    /usr/afs/bin    drwxr?xr-x
+    /usr/afs/db    drwx???---
+    /usr/afs/etc    drwxr?xr-x
+    /usr/afs/etc/KeyFile    -rw????---
+    /usr/afs/etc/UserList    -rw?????--
+    /usr/afs/local    drwx???---
+    /usr/afs/logs    drwxr?xr-x
+
+# <a name="Removing Client Functionality"></a> Removing Client Functionality
+
+Follow the instructions in this section only if you do not wish this machine to remain an AFS client. Removing client functionality means that you cannot use this machine to access AFS files.
+
+1. Remove the files from the /usr/vice/etc directory. The command does not remove the directory for files used by the dynamic kernel loader program, if it exists on this system type. Those files are still needed on a server-only machine.
+
+       # cd /usr/vice/etc
+
+       # rm  *
+
+       # rm -rf  C
+
+1. Create symbolic links to the [[ThisCell]] and [[CellServDB]] files in the /usr/afs/etc directory. This makes it possible to issue commands from the AFS command suites (such as bos and fs) on this machine.
+
+       # ln -s /usr/afs/etc/ThisCell ThisCell
+
+       # ln -s /usr/afs/etc/CellServDB CellServDB
+
+1. On IRIX systems, issue the chkconfig command to deactivate the afsclient configuration variable.
+
+       # /etc/chkconfig -f afsclient off
+
+1. Reboot the machine. Most system types use the shutdown command, but the appropriate options vary.
+
+       # cd /
+
+       # shutdown appropriate_options
diff --git a/AFSLore/LoadingAFSintotheAIXKernel.mdwn b/AFSLore/LoadingAFSintotheAIXKernel.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..918b66b
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,29 @@
+The AIX kernel extension facility is the dynamic kernel loader provided by IBM Corporation. AIX does not support incorporation of AFS modifications during a kernel build.
+
+For AFS to function correctly, the kernel extension facility must run each time the machine reboots, so the AFS initialization script (included in the AFS distribution) invokes it automatically. In this section you copy the script to the conventional location and edit it to select the appropriate options depending on whether NFS is also to run.
+
+After editing the script, you run it to incorporate AFS into the kernel. In later sections you verify that the script correctly initializes all AFS components, then configure the AIX inittab file so that the script runs automatically at reboot.
+
+1. Mount the AFS CD-ROM for AIX on the local /cdrom directory. For instructions on mounting CD-ROMs (either locally or remotely via NFS), see your AIX documentation. Then change directory as indicated.
+
+       # cd  /cdrom/rs_aix42/root.client/usr/vice/etc
+
+1. Copy the AFS kernel library files to the local /usr/vice/etc/dkload directory, and the AFS initialization script to the /etc directory.
+
+       # cp -rp  dkload  /usr/vice/etc
+
+       # cp -p  rc.afs  /etc/rc.afs
+
+1. Edit the /etc/rc.afs script, setting the NFS variable as indicated.
+
+If the machine is not to function as an NFS/AFS Translator, set the NFS variable as follows.
+
+NFS=$NFS\_NONE
+
+If the machine is to function as an NFS/AFS Translator and is running AIX 4.2.1 or higher, set the NFS variable as follows. Note that NFS must already be loaded into the kernel, which happens automatically on systems running AIX 4.1.1 and later, as long as the file /etc/exports exists.
+
+NFS=$NFS\_IAUTH
+
+1. Invoke the /etc/rc.afs script to load AFS modifications into the kernel. You can ignore any error messages about the inability to start the BOS Server or the Cache Manager or AFS client.
+
+       # /etc/rc.afs
diff --git a/AFSLore/LoadingAFSintotheIRIXKernel.mdwn b/AFSLore/LoadingAFSintotheIRIXKernel.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..63d8ec5
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,101 @@
+In this section you incorporate AFS into the IRIX kernel, choosing one of two methods:
+
+- Dynamic loading using the ml program distributed by Silicon Graphics, Incorporated (SGI).
+
+- Building a new static kernel.
+
+## <a name="Prepare for incorporating AFS in"></a> Prepare for incorporating AFS into the kernel by performing the following procedures.
+
+1. 1. 1. Mount the AFS CD-ROM for IRIX on the /cdrom directory. For instructions on mounting CD-ROMs (either locally or remotely via NFS), see your IRIX documentation. Then change directory as indicated.
+
+       # cd  /cdrom/sgi_65/root.client
+
+1. 1. 1. Copy the AFS initialization script to the local directory for initialization files (by convention, /etc/init.d on IRIX machines). Note the removal of the .rc extension as you copy the script.
+
+       # cp -p   usr/vice/etc/afs.rc  /etc/init.d/afs
+
+1. 1. 1. Issue the uname -m command to determine the machine's CPU board type. The IPxx value in the output must match one of the supported CPU board types listed in the IBM AFS Release Notes for the current version of AFS.
+
+       # uname -m
+
+## <a name="Incorporate AFS into the kernel,"></a> Incorporate AFS into the kernel, either using the ml program or by building AFS modifications into a static kernel.
+
+The ml program is the dynamic kernel loader provided by SGI for IRIX systems. If you use it rather than building AFS modifications into a static kernel, then for AFS to function correctly the ml program must run each time the machine reboots. Therefore, the AFS initialization script (included on the AFS CD-ROM) invokes it automatically when the afsml configuration variable is activated. In this section you activate the variable and run the script.
+
+In later sections you verify that the script correctly initializes all AFS components, then create the links that incorporate AFS into the IRIX startup and shutdown sequence.
+
+## <a name="Using the ml program"></a> Using the ml program
+
+1. Create the local /usr/vice/etc/sgiload directory to house the AFS kernel library file.
+
+       # mkdir /usr/vice/etc/sgiload
+
+1. Copy the appropriate AFS kernel library file to the /usr/vice/etc/sgiload directory. The IPxx portion of the library file name must match the value previously returned by the uname -m command. Also choose the file appropriate to whether the machine's kernel supports NFS server functionality (NFS must be supported for the machine to act as an NFS/AFS Translator). Single- and multiprocessor machines use the same library file.
+
+(You can choose to copy all of the kernel library files into the /usr/vice/etc/sgiload directory, but they require a significant amount of space.)
+
+If the machine's kernel supports NFS server functionality:
+
+       # cp -p  usr/vice/etc/sgiload/libafs.IPxx.o  /usr/vice/etc/sgiload
+
+If the machine's kernel does not support NFS server functionality:
+
+       # cp -p  usr/vice/etc/sgiload/libafs.IPxx.nonfs.o   \
+                       /usr/vice/etc/sgiload
+
+1. Issue the chkconfig command to activate the afsml configuration variable.
+
+       # /etc/chkconfig -f afsml on
+
+If the machine is to function as an NFS/AFS Translator and the kernel supports NFS server functionality, activate the afsxnfs variable.
+
+       # /etc/chkconfig -f afsxnfs on
+
+1. Run the /etc/init.d/afs script to load AFS extensions into the kernel. The script invokes the ml command, automatically determining which kernel library file to use based on this machine's CPU type and the activation state of the afsxnfs variable.
+
+You can ignore any error messages about the inability to start the BOS Server or the Cache Manager or AFS client.
+
+       # /etc/init.d/afs start
+
+## <a name="Building a Kernel"></a> Building a Kernel
+
+- If you prefer to build a kernel, and the machine's hardware and software configuration exactly matches another IRIX machine on which AFS is already built into the kernel, you can copy the kernel from that machine to this one. In general, however, it is better to build AFS modifications into the kernel on each machine according to the following instructions.
+
+1. 1. 1. 1. 1. Copy the kernel initialization file afs.sm to the local /var/sysgen/system directory, and the kernel master file afs to the local /var/sysgen/master.d directory.
+
+       # cp -p  bin/afs.sm  /var/sysgen/system
+
+       # cp -p  bin/afs  /var/sysgen/master.d
+
+1. 1. 1. 1. 1. Copy the appropriate AFS kernel library file to the local file /var/sysgen/boot/afs.a; the IPxx portion of the library file name must match the value previously returned by the uname -m command. Also choose the file appropriate to whether the machine's kernel supports NFS server functionality (NFS must be supported for the machine to act as an NFS/AFS Translator). Single- and multiprocessor machines use the same library file.
+
+If the machine's kernel supports NFS server functionality:
+
+       # cp -p   bin/libafs.IPxx.a   /var/sysgen/boot/afs.a
+
+If the machine's kernel does not support NFS server functionality:
+
+       # cp -p  bin/libafs.IPxx.nonfs.a  /var/sysgen/boot/afs.a
+
+1. 1. 1. 1. 1. Issue the chkconfig command to deactivate the afsml configuration variable.
+
+       # /etc/chkconfig -f afsml off
+
+If the machine is to function as an NFS/AFS Translator and the kernel supports NFS server functionality, activate the afsxnfs variable.
+
+       # /etc/chkconfig -f afsxnfs on
+
+1. 1. 1. 1. 1. Copy the existing kernel file, /unix, to a safe location. Compile the new kernel, which is created in the file /unix.install. It overwrites the existing /unix file when the machine reboots in the next step.
+
+       # cp /unix /unix_noafs
+
+       # autoconfig
+
+1. 1. 1. 1. 1. Reboot the machine to start using the new kernel, and login again as the superuser root.
+
+       # cd /
+
+       # shutdown -i6 -g0 -y
+
+       login: root
+       Password: root_password
diff --git a/AFSLore/LoadingAFSintotheLinuxKernel.mdwn b/AFSLore/LoadingAFSintotheLinuxKernel.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..57e2a62
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,21 @@
+The insmod program is the dynamic kernel loader for Linux. Linux does not support incorporation of AFS modifications during a kernel build.
+
+For AFS to function correctly, the insmod program must run each time the machine reboots, so the AFS initialization script (included on the AFS CD-ROM) invokes it automatically. The script also includes commands that select the appropriate AFS library file automatically. In this section you run the script.
+
+In later sections you verify that the script correctly initializes all AFS components, then activate a configuration variable, which results in the script being incorporated into the Linux startup and shutdown sequence.
+
+1. Mount the AFS CD-ROM for Linux on the local /cdrom directory. For instructions on mounting CD-ROMs (either locally or remotely via NFS), see your Linux documentation. Then change directory as indicated.
+
+       # cd  /cdrom/i386_linux22/root.client/usr/vice/etc
+
+1. Copy the AFS kernel library files to the local /usr/vice/etc/modload directory. The filenames for the libraries have the format libafs-version.o, where version indicates the kernel build level. The string .mp in the version indicates that the file is appropriate for machines running a multiprocessor kernel.
+
+       # cp -rp  modload  /usr/vice/etc
+
+1. Copy the AFS initialization script to the local directory for initialization files (by convention, /etc/rc.d/init.d on Linux machines). Note the removal of the .rc extension as you copy the script.
+
+       # cp -p   afs.rc  /etc/rc.d/init.d/afs
+
+1. Run the AFS initialization script to load AFS extensions into the kernel. You can ignore any error messages about the inability to start the BOS Server or the Cache Manager or AFS client.
+
+       # /etc/rc.d/init.d/afs  start
diff --git a/AFSLore/LoadingAFSintotheSolarisKernel.mdwn b/AFSLore/LoadingAFSintotheSolarisKernel.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..ed10ebb
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,43 @@
+The modload program is the dynamic kernel loader provided by Sun Microsystems for Solaris systems. Solaris does not support incorporation of AFS modifications during a kernel build.
+
+For AFS to function correctly, the modload program must run each time the machine reboots, so the AFS initialization script (included on the AFS CD-ROM) invokes it automatically. In this section you copy the appropriate AFS library file to the location where the modload program accesses it and then run the script.
+
+In later sections you verify that the script correctly initializes all AFS components, then create the links that incorporate AFS into the Solaris startup and shutdown sequence.
+
+1. Mount the AFS CD-ROM for Solaris on the /cdrom directory. For instructions on mounting CD-ROMs (either locally or remotely via NFS), see your Solaris documentation. Then change directory as indicated.
+
+       # cd  /cdrom/sysname/dest/root.client/usr/vice/etc/modload
+
+1. Copy the AFS initialization script to the local directory for initialization files (by convention, /etc/init.d on Solaris machines). Note the removal of the .rc extension as you copy the script.
+
+       # cp -p  afs.rc  /etc/init.d/afs
+       # chmod u+x /etc/init.d/afs
+
+1. Copy the appropriate AFS kernel library file to the local file /kernel/fs/afs.
+
+If the machine is running Solaris 2.6 or the 32-bit version of Solaris 7, its kernel supports NFS server functionality, and the nfsd process is running:
+
+       # cp -p libafs.o /kernel/fs/afs
+
+If the machine is running Solaris 2.6 or the 32-bit version of Solaris 7,8 or 9, and its kernel does not support NFS server functionality or the nfsd process is not running:
+
+       # cp -p libafs.nonfs.o /kernel/fs/afs
+
+If the machine is running the 64-bit version of Solaris 7,8 or 9, its kernel supports NFS server functionality, and the nfsd process is running:
+
+       # cp -p libafs64.o /kernel/fs/sparcv9/afs
+
+If the machine is running the 64-bit version of Solaris 7, 8 or 9, and its kernel does not support NFS server functionality or the nfsd process is not running:
+
+       # cp -p libafs64.nonfs.o /kernel/fs/sparcv9/afs
+
+1. Run the AFS initialization script to load AFS modifications into the kernel. You can ignore any error messages about the inability to start the BOS Server or the Cache Manager or AFS client.
+
+       # /etc/init.d/afs start
+
+When an entry called afs does not already exist in the local /etc/name\_to\_sysnum file, the script automatically creates it and reboots the machine to start using the new version of the file. If this happens, log in again as the superuser root after the reboot and run the initialization script again. This time the required entry exists in the /etc/name\_to\_sysnum file, and the modload program runs.
+
+       login: root
+       Password: root_password
+
+       # /etc/init.d/afs start
diff --git a/AFSLore/ReplacingthefsckProgramHelperonAIXSystems.mdwn b/AFSLore/ReplacingthefsckProgramHelperonAIXSystems.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..8714237
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,13 @@
+In this section, you make modifications to guarantee that the appropriate fsck program runs on AFS server partitions. The fsck program provided with the operating system must never run on AFS server partitions. Because it does not recognize the structures that the File Server uses to organize volume data, it removes all of the data. To repeat:
+
+Never run the standard fsck program on AFS server partitions. It discards AFS volumes.
+
+On AIX systems, you do not replace the fsck binary itself, but rather the program helper file included in the AIX distribution as /sbin/helpers/v3fshelper.
+
+1. Move the AIX fsck program helper to a safe location and install the version from the AFS distribution in its place. The AFS CD-ROM must still be mounted at the /cdrom directory.
+
+       # cd /sbin/helpers
+
+       # mv v3fshelper v3fshelper.noafs
+
+       # cp -p /cdrom/rs_aix42/root.server/etc/v3fshelper v3fshelper
diff --git a/AFSLore/ReplacingthefsckProgramonDigitalUNIXSystems.mdwn b/AFSLore/ReplacingthefsckProgramonDigitalUNIXSystems.mdwn
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..bdee3d6
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,27 @@
+In this section, you make modifications to guarantee that the appropriate fsck program runs on AFS server partitions. The fsck program provided with the operating system must never run on AFS server partitions. Because it does not recognize the structures that the File Server uses to organize volume data, it removes all of the data. To repeat:
+
+Never run the standard fsck program on AFS server partitions. It discards AFS volumes.
+
+On Digital UNIX systems, the files /sbin/fsck and /usr/sbin/fsck are driver programs. Rather than replacing either of them, you replace the actual binary included in the Digital UNIX distribution as /sbin/ufs\_fsck and /usr/sbin/ufs\_fsck.
+
+1. Install the vfsck binary to the /sbin and /usr/sbin directories. The AFS CD-ROM must still be mounted at the /cdrom directory.
+
+       # cd /cdrom/alpha_dux40/root.server/etc
+
+       # cp vfsck /sbin/vfsck
+
+       # cp vfsck /usr/sbin/vfsck
+
+1. Rename the Digital UNIX fsck binaries and create symbolic links to the vfsck program.
+
+       # cd /sbin
+
+       # mv ufs_fsck ufs_fsck.noafs
+
+       # ln -s vfsck ufs_fsck
+
+       # cd /usr/sbin
+
+       # mv ufs_fsck ufs_fsck.noafs
+
+       # ln -s vfsck ufs_fsck