use toc directive in faq pages
authorMichael Meffie <mmeffie@sinenomine.net>
Sat, 3 May 2014 05:08:29 +0000 (01:08 -0400)
committerMichael Meffie <mmeffie@sinenomine.net>
Sat, 3 May 2014 05:08:29 +0000 (01:08 -0400)
Use the toc directive to generate the table of contents
instead of handcoding html.

Fix the anchor tabs and other formatting errors so the
markdown generates valid html.

FurtherReading.mdwn
GeneralFAQ.mdwn
InstallingAdditionalServerMachines.mdwn
ResourcesFAQ.mdwn
UsageFAQ.mdwn

index f975b4e..e5fb3e5 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,6 @@
-## <a name="6  Bibliography"></a> 6 Bibliography
+[[!toc levels=3]]
+
+## 6 Bibliography
 
 The Bibliography of the [[AFSFrequentlyAskedQuestions]].
 
@@ -9,124 +11,257 @@ The Bibliography of the [[AFSFrequentlyAskedQuestions]].
 - [[ResourcesFAQ]]
 - [[AboutTheFAQ]]
 
-<div>
-  <ul>
-    <li><a href="#6  Bibliography"> 6 Bibliography</a><ul>
-        <li><a href="#Reference used in the FAQ"> Reference used in the FAQ</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#Other miscellaneous reference to"> Other miscellaneous reference to AFS</a></li>
-      </ul>
-    </li>
-  </ul>
-</div>
-
 If documentation is available via anonymous FTP it is indicated by a World Wide Web URL like:
 
-<ftp://athena-dist.mit.edu/pub/kerberos/doc/usenix.PS>
-
-Where `athena-dist.mit.edu` is the anonymous FTP site and `pub/kerberos/doc/usenix.PS` is the filename. Similarly, for those who have appropriate access, documents available via AFS are shown with the format:
+ftp://athena-dist.mit.edu/pub/kerberos/doc/usenix.PS
 
-<file:///afs/>.....
+Where `athena-dist.mit.edu` is the anonymous FTP site and
+`pub/kerberos/doc/usenix.PS` is the filename.
 
 These references can be used throughout the AFSLore Wiki using FurtherReading#Reference, for example, [[FurtherReading#Mills92]].
 
-### <a name="Reference used in the FAQ"></a> Reference used in the FAQ
+### Reference used in the FAQ
+
+<a name="Howard88"></a> [Howard88] John H Howard, Michael L Kazar, Sherri G Menees,
+David A Nichols, M Satyanarayanan, Robert N Sidebotham, Michael J West ["Scale
+and Performance in a Distributed File System"][1], ACM Transactions on Computer
+Systems, Vol. 6, No. 1, Feb 1988 pp 51-81.
+
+[1]: http://www-2.cs.cmu.edu/afs/cs/project/coda/Web/docdir/s11.pdf
+
+<a name="Kazar88a"></a> [Kazar88a] Michael L Kazar, "Synchronisation and Caching
+Issues in the Andrew File System", USENIX Proceedings, Dallas, TX, Winter 1988
+
+<a name="Spector89"></a> [Spector89] Alfred Z Spector, Michael L Kazar,
+"Uniting File Systems", UNIX Review, March 1989
+
+<a name="Johnson90"></a> [Johnson90] Johna Till Johnson, "Distributed File
+System brings LAN Technology to WANs", Data Communications, November 1990, pp
+66-67.  2 August 1988
+
+<a name="Padovano91"></a> [Padovano91] Michael Padovano, PADCOM Associates, "AFS
+widens your horizons in distributed computing", Systems Integration, March 1991
+
+<a name="Lammert90"></a> [Lammert90] Steve Lammert, "The AFS 3.0 Backup System",
+LISA IV Conference Proceedings, Colorado Springs, Colorado, October 1990.
+
+<a name="Kazar90"><a> [Kazar90] Michael L Kazar, Bruce W Leverett, Owen T
+Anderson, Vasilis Apostolides, Beth A Bottos, Sailesh Chutani, Craig F
+Everhart, W Anthony Mason, Shu-Tsui Tu, Edward R Zayas, "DEcorum File System
+Architectural Overview", USENIX Conference Proceedings, Anaheim, Texas, Summer
+1990.
+
+<a name="DigitialDesktop90"></a> [DigitialDesktop90] "AFS Drives DCE
+Selection", Digital Desktop, Vol 1 No 6 Sept 1990.
+
+<a name="Kistler91"></a> [Kistler91] James J Kistler, M Satyanarayanan,
+"Disconnected Operation in the Coda Filesystem", CMU School of Computer Science
+technical report, CMU-CS-91-166 26th July 1991.
+
+<a name="Kumar91"></a> [Kumar91] Puneet Kumar. M Satyanarayanan, "Log-based
+Directory Resolution in the Coda File System", CMU School of Computer Science
+internal document, 2 July 1991.
+
+<a name="Zayas87"></a> [Zayas87] Edward R Zayas, "Administrative Cells:
+Proposal for Cooperative Andrew File Systems", Information Technology Center
+internal document, Carnegie-Mellon University, 25th June 1987
+
+<a name="Zayas88"></a> [Zayas88] Ed Zayas, Craig Everhart, ["Design and
+Specification of the Cellular Andrew Environment"][2], Information Technology
+Center, Carnegie-Mellon University, 2 August 1988
+
+[2]: http://reports-archive.adm.cs.cmu.edu/anon/itc/CMU-ITC-070.pdf
+
+<a name="Kazar88b"></a> [Kazar88b] Kazar, Michael L, Information Technology
+Center, Carnegie-Mellon University, "Ubik - A library for Managing Ubiquitous
+Data", ITCID, Pittsburgh, PA, 1988
+
+<a name="Kazar88c"></a> [Kazar88c] Kazar, Michael L, Information Technology
+Center, Carnegie-Mellon University, "Quorum Completion", ITCID, Pittsburgh, PA,
+1988
+
+<a name="Miller87"></a> [Miller87] SP Miller, BC Neuman, JI
+Schiller, JH Saltzer, ["Kerberos Authentication and Authorization System"][3],
+Project Athena technical Plan, Section E.2.1, MIT, December 1987
+
+[3]: ftp://athena-dist.mit.edu/pub/kerberos/doc/techplan.PS
+[4]: ftp://athena-dist.mit.edu/pub/kerberos/doc/techplan.txt
+[5]: file:///afs/watson.ibm.com/projects/agora/papers/kerberos/techplan.PS
+
+<a name="Bryant88"></a> [Bryant88] Bill Bryant, ["Designing an Authentication
+System: a Dialogue in Four Scenes"][6], Project Athena internal document, MIT,
+draft of 8th February 1988
+
+[6]: ftp://athena-dist.mit.edu/pub/kerberos/doc/dialogue.PS
+[7]: ftp://athena-dist.mit.edu/pub/kerberos/doc/dialogue.mss
+[8]: file:///afs/watson.ibm.com/projects/agora/papers/kerberos/dialogue.PS
+
+<a name="ProgRegArch"></a> [ProgRegArch] Edward R Zayas, ["AFS-3 Programmer's
+Reference: Architectural Overview"][9], Transarc Corporation, FS-00-D160, September
+1991
 
-<a name="1"> <a name="Howard88"> [Howard88] John H Howard, Michael L Kazar, Sherri G Menees, David A Nichols, M Satyanarayanan, Robert N Sidebotham, Michael J West "Scale and Performance in a Distributed File System", ACM Transactions on Computer Systems, Vol. 6, No. 1, Feb 1988 pp 51-81. <http://www-2.cs.cmu.edu/afs/cs/project/coda/Web/docdir/s11.pdf> </a></a>
+[9]:  ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/archov-doc.ps
+[10]: ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/archov-doc.dvi
+[11]: file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/archov-doc.ps
+[12]: file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/archov-doc.dvi
+[13]: file:///afs/watson.ibm.com/projects/agora/papers/afs/archov-doc.ps
 
-<a name="2"> <a name="Kazar88a"> [Kazar88a] Michael L Kazar, "Synchronisation and Caching Issues in the Andrew File System", USENIX Proceedings, Dallas, TX, Winter 1988 </a></a>
+<a name="ProgRefAuth"></a> [ProgRefAuth] ["AFS Programmer's Reference:
+Authentication Server Interface"][14], Transarc Corporation, 12th April 1993
 
-<a name="3"> <a name="Spector89"> [Spector89] Alfred Z Spector, Michael L Kazar, "Uniting File Systems", UNIX Review, March 1989 </a></a>
+[14]: ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/asrv-ispec.ps
+[15]: ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/asrv-ispec.dvi
+[16]: file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/asrv-ispec.ps
+[17]: file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/asrv-ispec.dvi
+[18]: file:///afs/watson.ibm.com/projects/agora/papers/afs/asrv-ispec.ps
 
-<a name="4"> <a name="Johnson90"> [Johnson90] Johna Till Johnson, "Distributed File System brings LAN Technology to WANs", Data Communications, November 1990, pp 66-67. </a></a>
+<a name="ProgRefBos"></a> [ProgRefBos] Edward R Zayas, ["AFS-3 Programmer's
+Reference: BOS Server Interface"][19], Transarc Corporation, FS-00-D161, 28th
+August 1991
 
-<a name="5"> <a name="Padovano91"> [Padovano91] Michael Padovano, PADCOM Associates, "AFS widens your horizons in distributed computing", Systems Integration, March 1991 </a></a>
-<a name="6"> <a name="Lammert90"> [Lammert90] Steve Lammert, "The AFS 3.0 Backup System", LISA IV Conference Proceedings, Colorado Springs, Colorado, October 1990. </a></a>
+[19]: ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/bsrv-spec.ps
+[20]: ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/bsrv-spec.dvi
+[21]: file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/bsrv-spec.ps
+[22]: file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/bsrv-spec.dvi
+[23]: file:///afs/watson.ibm.com/projects/agora/papers/afs/bsrv-spec.ps
 
-<a name="7"> <a name="Kazar90"> [Kazar90] Michael L Kazar, Bruce W Leverett, Owen T Anderson, Vasilis Apostolides, Beth A Bottos, Sailesh Chutani, Craig F Everhart, W Anthony Mason, Shu-Tsui Tu, Edward R Zayas, "DEcorum File System Architectural Overview", USENIX Conference Proceedings, Anaheim, Texas, Summer 1990. </a></a>
+<a name="ProgRefFSCM"></a> [ProgRefFSCM] Edward R Zayas, ["AFS-3 Programmer's
+Reference: File Server/Cache Manager Interface"][24], Transarc Corporation,
+FS-00-D162, 20th August 1991
 
-<a name="8"> <a name="DigitialDesktop90"> [DigitialDesktop90] "AFS Drives DCE Selection", Digital Desktop, Vol 1 No 6 Sept 1990. </a></a>
+[24]: ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/fscm-ispec.ps
+[25]: ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/fscm-ispec.dvi
+[26]: file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/fscm-ispec.ps
+[27]: file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/fscm-ispec.dvi
+[28]: file:///afs/watson.ibm.com/projects/agora/papers/afs/fscm-ispec.ps
 
-<a name="9"> <a name="Kistler91"> [Kistler91] James J Kistler, M Satyanarayanan, "Disconnected Operation in the Coda Filesystem", CMU School of Computer Science technical report, CMU-CS-91-166 26th July 1991. </a></a>
+<a name="ProgRegRx"></a> [ProgRegRx] Edward R Zayas, ["AFS-3 Programmer's
+Reference: Specification for the Rx Remote Procedure Call Facility"][29],
+Transarc Corporation, FS-00-D164, 28th August 1991
 
-<a name="10"> <a name="Kumar91"> [Kumar91] Puneet Kumar. M Satyanarayanan, "Log-based Directory Resolution in the Coda File System", CMU School of Computer Science internal document, 2 July 1991. </a></a>
+[29]: ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/rx-spec.ps
+[30]: ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/rx-spec.dvi
+[31]: file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/rx-spec.ps
+[32]: file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/rx-spec.dvi
+[33]: file:///afs/watson.ibm.com/projects/agora/papers/afs/rx-spec.ps
 
-<a name="11"> <a name="Zayas87"> [Zayas87] Edward R Zayas, "Administrative Cells: Proposal for Cooperative Andrew File Systems", Information Technology Center internal document, Carnegie-Mellon University, 25th June 1987 </a></a>
+<a name="ProgRegVLDB"></a> [ProgRegVLDB] Edward R Zayas, ["AFS-3 Programmer's
+Reference: Volume Server/Volume Location Server Interface"][34], Transarc
+Corporation, FS-00-D165, 29th August 1991
 
-<a name="12"> <a name="Zayas88"> [Zayas88] Ed Zayas, Craig Everhart, "Design and Specification of the Cellular Andrew Environment", Information Technology Center, Carnegie-Mellon University, [CMU-ITC-070](http://reports-archive.adm.cs.cmu.edu/anon/itc/CMU-ITC-070.pdf), 2 August 1988 </a></a>
+[34]: ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/vvl-spec.ps
+[35]: ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/vvl-spec.dvi
+[36]: file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/vvl-spec.ps
+[37]: file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/vvl-spec.dvi
+[38]: file:///afs/watson.ibm.com/projects/agora/papers/afs/vvl-spec.ps
 
-<a name="13"> <a name="Kazar88b"> [Kazar88b] Kazar, Michael L, Information Technology Center, Carnegie-Mellon University, "Ubik - A library for Managing Ubiquitous Data", ITCID, Pittsburgh, PA, 1988 </a></a>
+<a name="UserGuide"></a> [UserGuide] "AFS User Guide", Transarc Corporation,
+FS-D200-00.08.3
 
-<a name="14"> <a name="Kazar88c"> [Kazar88c] Kazar, Michael L, Information Technology Center, Carnegie-Mellon University, "Quorum Completion", ITCID, Pittsburgh, PA, 1988 </a></a>
+<a name="CommandsRef"></a> [CommandsRef] "AFS Commands Reference Manual",
+Transarc Corporation, FS-D200-00.11.3
 
-<a name="15"> <a name="Miller87"> [Miller87] SP Miller, BC Neuman, JI Schiller, JH Saltzer, "Kerberos Authentication and Authorization System", Project Athena technical Plan, Section E.2.1, MIT, December 1987 <ftp://athena-dist.mit.edu/pub/kerberos/doc/techplan.PS> <ftp://athena-dist.mit.edu/pub/kerberos/doc/techplan.txt> <file:///afs/watson.ibm.com/projects/agora/papers/kerberos/techplan.PS> </a></a>
+<a name="AdminGuide"></a> [AdminGuide] "AFS Systems Administrators Guide", Transarc
+Corporation, FS-D200-00.10.3
 
-<a name="16"> <a name="Bryant88"> [Bryant88] Bill Bryant, "Designing an Authentication System: a Dialogue in Four Scenes", Project Athena internal document, MIT, draft of 8th February 1988 <ftp://athena-dist.mit.edu/pub/kerberos/doc/dialogue.PS> <ftp://athena-dist.mit.edu/pub/kerberos/doc/dialogue.mss> <file:///afs/watson.ibm.com/projects/agora/papers/kerberos/dialogue.PS> </a></a>
+<a name="Bellovin90"></a> [Bellovin90] Steven M. Bellovin, Michael Merritt
+["Limitations of the Kerberos Authentication System"][39], Computer
+Communications Review, October 1990, Vol 20 #5, pp. 119-132
 
-<a name="17"> <a name="ProgRegArch"> [ProgRegArch] Edward R Zayas, "AFS-3 Programmer's Reference: Architectural Overview", Transarc Corporation, FS-00-D160, September 1991 <ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/archov-doc.ps> <ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/archov-doc.dvi> <file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/archov-doc.ps> <file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/archov-doc.dvi> <file:///afs/watson.ibm.com/projects/agora/papers/afs/archov-doc.ps> </a></a>
+[39]: ftp://research.att.com/dist/internet_security/kerblimit.usenix.ps
+[40]: file:///afs/watson.ibm.com/projects/agora/papers/kerberos/limitations.PS
 
-<a name="18"> <a name="ProgRefAuth"> [ProgRefAuth] "AFS Programmer's Reference: Authentication Server Interface", Transarc Corporation, 12th April 1993 <ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/asrv-ispec.ps> <ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/asrv-ispec.dvi> <file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/asrv-ispec.ps> <file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/asrv-ispec.dvi> <file:///afs/watson.ibm.com/projects/agora/papers/afs/asrv-ispec.ps> </a></a>
+<a name="Steiner88"></a> [Steiner88] Jennifer G. Steiner, Clifford Neuman,
+Jeffrey I. Schiller ["Kerberos: An Authentication Service for Open Network
+Systems"][41], 1988
 
-<a name="19"> <a name="ProgRefBos"> [ProgRefBos] Edward R Zayas, "AFS-3 Programmer's Reference: BOS Server Interface", Transarc Corporation, FS-00-D161, 28th August 1991 <ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/bsrv-spec.ps> <ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/bsrv-spec.dvi> <file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/bsrv-spec.ps> <file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/bsrv-spec.dvi> <file:///afs/watson.ibm.com/projects/agora/papers/afs/bsrv-spec.ps> </a></a>
+[41]: ftp://athena-dist.mit.edu/pub/kerberos/doc/usenix.PS
+[42]: ftp://athena-dist.mit.edu/pub/kerberos/doc/usenix.txt
 
-<a name="20"> <a name="ProgRefFSCM"> [ProgRefFSCM] Edward R Zayas, "AFS-3 Programmer's Reference: File Server/Cache Manager Interface", Transarc Corporation, FS-00-D162, 20th August 1991 <ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/fscm-ispec.ps> <ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/fscm-ispec.dvi> <file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/fscm-ispec.ps> <file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/fscm-ispec.dvi> <file:///afs/watson.ibm.com/projects/agora/papers/afs/fscm-ispec.ps> </a></a>
+<a name="Jaspan"></a> [Jaspan] Barry Jaspan ["Kerberos Users' Frequently
+Asked Questions"][43]
 
-<a name="21"> <a name="ProgRegRx"> [ProgRegRx] Edward R Zayas, "AFS-3 Programmer's Reference: Specification for the Rx Remote Procedure Call Facility", Transarc Corporation, FS-00-D164, 28th August 1991 <ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/rx-spec.ps> <ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/rx-spec.dvi> <file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/rx-spec.ps> <file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/rx-spec.dvi> <file:///afs/watson.ibm.com/projects/agora/papers/afs/rx-spec.ps> </a></a>
+[43]: ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet/news.answers/kerberos-faq/user
+[44]: http://www.ov.com/misc/krb-faq.html
 
-<a name="22"> <a name="ProgRegVLDB"> [ProgRegVLDB] Edward R Zayas, "AFS-3 Programmer's Reference: Volume Server/Volume Location Server Interface", Transarc Corporation, FS-00-D165, 29th August 1991 <ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/vvl-spec.ps> <ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progint/vvl-spec.dvi> <file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/vvl-spec.ps> <file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progint/vvl-spec.dvi> <file:///afs/watson.ibm.com/projects/agora/papers/afs/vvl-spec.ps> </a></a>
+<a name="Honeyman91"></a> [Honeyman91] P. Honeyman, L.B. Huston, M.T.
+Stolarchuk ["Hijacking AFS"][45], 1991
 
-<a name="23"> <a name="UserGuide"> [UserGuide] "AFS User Guide", Transarc Corporation, FS-D200-00.08.3 </a></a>
+[45]: ftp://ftp.sage.usenix.org/pub/usenix/winter92/hijacking-afs.ps.Z
+[46]: file:///afs/watson.ibm.com/projects/agora/papers/afs/afs_hijacking.ps
 
-<a name="24"> <a name="CommandsRef"> [CommandsRef] "AFS Commands Reference Manual", Transarc Corporation, FS-D200-00.11.3 </a></a>
+<a name="Sidebotham88"></a> [Sidebotham88] R.N. Sidebotham "Rx: Extended Remote
+Procedure Call" Proceedings of the Nationwide File System Workshop Information
+Technology Center, Carnegie Mellon University, (August 1988)
 
-<a name="25"> <a name="AdminGuide"> [AdminGuide] "AFS Systems Administrators Guide", Transarc Corporation, FS-D200-00.10.3 </a></a>
+<a name="Sidebotham86"></a> [Sidebotham86] R.N. Sidebotham ["Volumes: The
+Andrew File System Data Structuring Primitive"][47] Technical Report Information
+Technology Center, Carnegie Mellon University, (August 1986)
 
-<a name="26"> <a name="Bellovin90"> [Bellovin90] Steven M. Bellovin, Michael Merritt "Limitations of the Kerberos Authentication System", Computer Communications Review, October 1990, Vol 20 #5, pp. 119-132 [ftp://research.att.com/dist/internet\_security/kerblimit.usenix.ps](ftp://research.att.com/dist/internet_security/kerblimit.usenix.ps) <file:///afs/watson.ibm.com/projects/agora/papers/kerberos/limitations.PS> </a></a>
+[47]: http://reports-archive.adm.cs.cmu.edu/anon/itc/CMU-ITC-053.pdf
 
-<a name="27"> <a name="Steiner88"> [Steiner88] Jennifer G. Steiner, Clifford Neuman, Jeffrey I. Schiller "Kerberos: An Authentication Service for Open Network Systems", 1988 <ftp://athena-dist.mit.edu/pub/kerberos/doc/usenix.PS> <ftp://athena-dist.mit.edu/pub/kerberos/doc/usenix.txt> </a></a>
+<a name="Cohen93"></a> [Cohen93] Cohen, David L. ["AFS: NFS on steroids"][48], LAN
+Technology March 1993 v9 n3 p51(9)
 
-<a name="28"> <a name="Jaspan"> [Jaspan] Barry Jaspan "Kerberos Users' Frequently Asked Questions" <ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet/news.answers/kerberos-faq/user> <http://www.ov.com/misc/krb-faq.html> </a></a>
+[48]: NFS_on_steroids.txt
+[49]: ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afs-contrib/doc/faq/NFS_on_steroids
 
-<a name="29"> <a name="Honeyman91"> [Honeyman91] P. Honeyman, L.B. Huston, M.T. Stolarchuk "Hijacking AFS", 1991 <ftp://ftp.sage.usenix.org/pub/usenix/winter92/hijacking-afs.ps.Z> [file:///afs/watson.ibm.com/projects/agora/papers/afs/afs\_hijacking.ps](file:///afs/watson.ibm.com/projects/agora/papers/afs/afs_hijacking.ps) </a></a>
+<a name="Schultz93"></a> [Schultz93] Marybeth Schultz ["AFS Troubleshooting
+Tools"][50] Transarc Corporation, January 11 1993, draft document
 
-<a name="30"> <a name="Sidebotham88"> [Sidebotham88] R.N. Sidebotham "Rx: Extended Remote Procedure Call" Proceedings of the Nationwide File System Workshop Information Technology Center, Carnegie Mellon University, (August 1988) </a></a>
+[50]: ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/trguide/external.afsug.ps
 
-<a name="31"> <a name="Sidebotham86"> [Sidebotham86] R.N. Sidebotham "Volumes: The Andrew File System Data Structuring Primitive" Technical Report [CMU-ITC-053](http://reports-archive.adm.cs.cmu.edu/anon/itc/CMU-ITC-053.pdf), Information Technology Center, Carnegie Mellon University, (August 1986) </a></a>
+<a name="Stallings94"></a> [Stallings94] William Stallings "Kerberos Keeps the
+Enterprise Secure" Data Communications, October 1994, Vol 23 No 14 Page 103
 
-<a name="32"> <a name="Cohen93"> [Cohen93] Cohen, David L. "AFS: NFS on steroids", LAN Technology March 1993 v9 n3 p51(9) [ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afs-contrib/doc/faq/NFS\_on\_steroids](ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afs-contrib/doc/faq/NFS_on_steroids) [[NFS_on_steroids.txt]](NFS_on_steroids) </a></a>
+<a name="Mills89"></a> [Mills89] DL Mills ["Internet Time Synchronization: the
+Network Time Protocol"][51] RFC 1129, October 1989
 
-<a name="33"> <a name="Schultz93"> [Schultz93] Marybeth Schultz "AFS Troubleshooting Tools" Transarc Corporation, January 11 1993, draft document <ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/trguide/external.afsug.ps> </a></a>
+[51]: http://www.eecis.udel.edu/~mills/database/rfc/rfc1129/rfc1129b.pdf
+[52]: http://www.eecis.udel.edu/~mills/database/rfc/rfc1129/rfc1129b.ps
+[53]: ftp://nic.ddn.mil/rfc/rfc1129.ps
 
-<a name="34"> <a name="Stallings94"> [Stallings94] William Stallings "Kerberos Keeps the Enterprise Secure" Data Communications, October 1994, Vol 23 No 14 Page 103 </a></a>
+<a name="Mills92"></a> [Mills92] DL Mills ["Network Time Protocol (Version 3)
+Specification, Implementation and Analysis"][54] RFC 1305, March 1992
 
-<a name="35"> <a name="Mills89"> [Mills89] DL Mills "Internet Time Synchronization: the Network Time Protocol" RFC 1129, October 1989 <http://www.eecis.udel.edu/~mills/database/rfc/rfc1129/rfc1129b.ps> <http://www.eecis.udel.edu/~mills/database/rfc/rfc1129/rfc1129b.pdf> <ftp://nic.ddn.mil/rfc/rfc1129.ps> </a></a>
+[54]: http://www.eecis.udel.edu/~mills/database/rfc/rfc1305/rfc1305b.ps
+[55]: http://www.eecis.udel.edu/~mills/database/rfc/rfc1305/rfc1305b.pdf
+[56]: ftp://nic.ddn.mil/rfc/rfc1305.tar.Z
+[57]: ftp://nic.ddn.mil/rfc/rfc1305.txt
 
-<a name="36"> <a name="Mills92"> [Mills92] DL Mills "Network Time Protocol (Version 3) Specification, Implementation and Analysis" RFC 1305, March 1992 <http://www.eecis.udel.edu/~mills/database/rfc/rfc1305/rfc1305b.ps> <http://www.eecis.udel.edu/~mills/database/rfc/rfc1305/rfc1305b.pdf> <ftp://nic.ddn.mil/rfc/rfc1305.tar.Z> <ftp://nic.ddn.mil/rfc/rfc1305.txt> </a></a>
+<a name="NTP"></a>[NTP] Time Synchronization Server, http://www.ntp.org
 
-<a name="NTP">[NTP] Time Synchronization Server, <http://www.ntp.org>. </a>
+<a name="Everhart90"></a> [Everhart90][58] Craig Everhart ["Conventions for Names in
+the Service Directory in the AFS Distributed File System"][58] March 1990
 
-<a name="37"> <a name="Everhart90"> [Everhart90] Craig Everhart "Conventions for Names in the Service Directory in the AFS Distributed File System" March 1990 <ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afs-contrib/doc/faq/service-spec.ez.ps> <ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afs-contrib/doc/faq/service-spec.ez> <file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afs-contrib/doc/faq/service-spec.ez> <file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afs-contrib/doc/faq/service-spec.ez.ps> [[service-spec.ez.ps]] service-spec.ez.ps </a></a>
+[58]: service-spec.ez.ps
+[59]: ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afs-contrib/doc/faq/service-spec.ez.ps
+[60]: ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afs-contrib/doc/faq/service-spec.ez
+[61]: file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afs-contrib/doc/faq/service-spec.ez
+[62]: file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afs-contrib/doc/faq/service-spec.ez.ps
 
-<a name="38"> <a name="ProgRef"> [ProgRef] AFS Programmer's Reference Manual <ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progref/3.0/main.ps> <file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progref/3.0/> </a></a>
+<a name="ProgRef"></a> [ProgRef] [AFS Programmer's Reference Manual][63]
 
-<a name="Katz94"> [Katz94] Eric Katz, Michelle Butler and Robert McGrath, "A Scalable HTTP Server: The NCSA Prototype", National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Il 61820, <http://archive.ncsa.uiuc.edu/InformationServers/Conferences/CERNwww94/www94.ncsa.html> </a>
+[63]: ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/progref/3.0/main.ps
+[64]: file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afsps/doc/progref/3.0/
 
-> Describes the use of AFS to create a scalable web server.
+<a name="Katz94"></a> [Katz94] Eric Katz, Michelle Butler and Robert McGrath,
+["A Scalable HTTP Server: The NCSA Prototype"][65], National Center for
+Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Il
+61820,
 
-### <a name="Other miscellaneous reference to"></a> Other miscellaneous reference to AFS
+[65]: http://archive.ncsa.uiuc.edu/InformationServers/Conferences/CERNwww94/www94.ncsa.html
 
-Mic Bowman, Bill Camargo, "Digital Libraries: The Next Generation in File System Technology", D-Lib Magazine, February 1998, <http://www.dlib.org/dlib/february98/bowman/02bowman.html>.
+### Other miscellaneous reference to AFS
 
+Mic Bowman, Bill Camargo, ["Digital Libraries: The Next Generation in File
+System Technology"][66], D-Lib Magazine, February 1998,
 
-> Uses AFS as an example of the value of wide-area file systems. It outlines several modes of usage exemplified by AFS. It goes on to suggest enhancements that would make a file system more valuable as a collaborative tool: extensible user-level metadata, explicit object typing with inheritance, and meta-object to store and manage references to other objects.
->
-> <br />
->
-> --
->
-> Ted Anderson
->
-> - 01 Aug 2002
+[66]: http://www.dlib.org/dlib/february98/bowman/02bowman.html.
 
+> Uses AFS as an example of the value of wide-area file systems. It outlines
+> several modes of usage exemplified by AFS. It goes on to suggest enhancements
+> that would make a file system more valuable as a collaborative tool:
+> extensible user-level metadata, explicit object typing with inheritance, and
+> meta-object to store and manage references to other objects.
 
-[[service-spec.ez.ps]]
-[[NFS_on_steroids.txt]]
index 07697a0..2d87b6d 100644 (file)
@@ -1,47 +1,18 @@
-## <a name="1  General"></a> 1 General
+[[!toc levels=3]]
 
-The General Section of the [[AFSFrequentlyAskedQuestions]].
 
-- [[PreambleFAQ]]
+## 1 General
 
-<div>
-  <ul>
-    <li><a href="#1  General"> 1 General</a><ul>
-        <li><a href="#1.01  What is AFS?"> 1.01 What is AFS?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#1.02  Who supplies AFS?"> 1.02 Who supplies AFS?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#1.03  What is /afs?"> 1.03 What is /afs?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#1.04  What is an AFS cell?"> 1.04 What is an AFS cell?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#1.05  What are the benefits of u"> 1.05 What are the benefits of using AFS?</a><ul>
-            <li><a href="#1.05.a  Cache Manager"> 1.05.a Cache Manager</a></li>
-            <li><a href="#1.05.b  Location independence"> 1.05.b Location independence</a></li>
-            <li><a href="#1.05.c  Scalability"> 1.05.c Scalability</a></li>
-            <li><a href="#1.05.d  Improved security"> 1.05.d Improved security</a></li>
-            <li><a href="#1.05.e  Single systems image (SS"> 1.05.e Single systems image (SSI)</a></li>
-            <li><a href="#1.05.f  Replicated AFS volumes"> 1.05.f Replicated AFS volumes</a></li>
-            <li><a href="#1.05.g  Improved robustness to s"> 1.05.g Improved robustness to server crash</a></li>
-            <li><a href="#1.05.h  "Easy to use" networking"> 1.05.h "Easy to use" networking</a></li>
-            <li><a href="#1.05.i  Communications protocol"> 1.05.i Communications protocol</a></li>
-            <li><a href="#1.05.j  Improved system manageme"> 1.05.j Improved system management capability</a></li>
-          </ul>
-        </li>
-        <li><a href="#1.06  Which systems is AFS avail"> 1.06 Which systems is AFS available for?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#1.07  What does "ls /afs" displa"> 1.07 What does "ls /afs" display in the Internet AFS filetree?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#1.08  Why does AFS use Kerberos"> 1.08 Why does AFS use Kerberos authentication?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#1.09  Does AFS work over protoco"> 1.09 Does AFS work over protocols other than UDP/IP?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#1.10  How can I access AFS from"> 1.10 How can I access AFS from my PC?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#1.11  How does AFS compare with"> 1.11 How does AFS compare with NFS?</a></li>
-      </ul>
-    </li>
-  </ul>
-</div>
+The General Section of the [[AFSFrequentlyAskedQuestions]].
 
+- [[PreambleFAQ]]
 - [[UsageFAQ]]
 - [[AdminFAQ]]
 - [[ResourcesFAQ]]
 - [[AboutTheFAQ]]
 - [[FurtherReading]]
 
-### <a name="1.01  What is AFS?"></a> 1.01 What is AFS?
+### 1.01 What is AFS?
 
 AFS is a distributed filesystem that enables co-operating hosts (clients and servers) to efficiently share filesystem resources across both local area and wide area networks.
 
@@ -51,7 +22,7 @@ AFS is based on a distributed file system originally developed at the Informatio
 
 In November, 2000, IBM Open-Sourced AFS, creating [[OpenAFS]]. [[OpenAFS]] is under active development; as of this writing, the 1.6.4 release is being prepared for Unix-like platforms, and the 1.7 series for Windows is updated regularly.
 
-### <a name="1.02  Who supplies AFS?"></a> 1.02 Who supplies AFS?
+### 1.02 Who supplies AFS?
 
 [[OpenAFS]] is available from the [[OpenAFS]] website. An independent open source project, Arla, supports some clients that [[OpenAFS]] does not, but has not been updated since release 0.90 in early 2007; the release of [[OpenAFS]] largely removed the reasons for the development of Arla and its sister project Milka (an open source AFS server).
 
@@ -74,13 +45,13 @@ IBM no longer markets AFS and has declared an end-of-life for support.
   </tr>
 </table>
 
-### <a name="1.03  What is /afs?"></a> 1.03 What is `/afs`?
+### 1.03 What is `/afs`?
 
 The root of the AFS filetree is `/afs`. If you execute `ls /afs`, you will see directories that correspond to AFS cells (see below). These cells may be local (on same LAN) or remote (e.g. halfway around the world).
 
 With AFS you can access all the filesystem space under `/afs` with commands you already use (e.g. `cd`, `cp`, `rm`, and so on) provided you have been granted permission (see AFS ACL below).
 
-### <a name="1.04  What is an AFS cell?"></a> 1.04 What is an AFS cell?
+### 1.04 What is an AFS cell?
 
 An AFS cell is a collection of servers grouped together administratively and presenting a single, cohesive filesystem. Typically, an AFS cell is a set of hosts that use the same Internet domain name.
 
@@ -88,7 +59,7 @@ Normally, a variation of the domain name is used as the AFS cell name.
 
 Users log into AFS client workstations which request information and files from the cell's servers on behalf of the users.
 
-### <a name="1.05  What are the benefits of u"></a> 1.05 What are the benefits of using AFS?
+### 1.05 What are the benefits of using AFS?
 
 The main strengths of AFS are its:
 
@@ -100,7 +71,7 @@ The main strengths of AFS are its:
 
 Here are some of the advantages of using AFS in more detail:
 
-#### <a name="1.05.a  Cache Manager"></a> 1.05.a Cache Manager
+#### 1.05.a Cache Manager
 
 AFS client machines run a Cache Manager process. The Cache Manager maintains information about the identities of the users logged into the machine, finds and requests data on their behalf, and keeps chunks of retrieved files on local disk.
 
@@ -110,7 +81,7 @@ Local caching also significantly reduces the amount of network traffic, improvin
 
 Many modern NFS implementations provide metadata caching, but this caching is limited and the protocol support for it is somewhat weak, with the result that cached NFS can get out of sync with the server. NFS does not support file data caching at all, although some operating systems can be configured to make use of a separate cache filesystem module which must be configured separately from NFS on each client workstation and for each NFS mountpoint. As this cache is separate, it can only avoid becoming out of sync with the remote filesystem at the price of extra validation and additional network traffic to detect updates every time the file is accessed (or, if there is a delay set to minimize this traffic, it will "miss" remote changes made within that window); [[OpenAFS]]'s integrated cache, by comparison, will be notified of changes on the fileserver (by means of "callback breaking") and only needs to check explicitly for remote updates if the callback has expired (roughly 2 hours). In addition, for files on a read-only volume, it is sufficient to check for a volume update to revalidate all locally cached files on that volume.
 
-#### <a name="1.05.b  Location independence"></a> 1.05.b Location independence
+#### 1.05.b Location independence
 
 Unlike NFS, which makes use of a per-client mount table (such as `/etc/filesystems` on AIX or `/etc/fstab` on Linux) to map (mount) between a local directory name and a remote filesystem, AFS does its mapping (filename to location) at the server. This has the tremendous advantage of making the served filespace location independent.
 
@@ -124,7 +95,7 @@ With AFS, you simply move the AFS volume(s) which constitute `/home` between the
 
 (Actually, the AFS equivalent of `/home` would be `/afs/$AFSCELL/home`, where `$AFSCELL` is the AFS cellname.)
 
-#### <a name="1.05.c  Scalability"></a> 1.05.c Scalability
+#### 1.05.c Scalability
 
 With location independence comes scalability. An architectural goal of the AFS designers was client/server ratios of 200:1; some sites exceed this ratio. Exactly what ratio your cell can use depends on many factors including:
 
@@ -138,7 +109,7 @@ With location independence comes scalability. An architectural goal of the AFS d
 
 AFS cells can range from the small (1 server/client) to the massive (with hundreds of servers and thousands of clients). Cells can be dynamic: it is simple to add new fileservers or clients and grow the computing resources to meet new user requirements.
 
-#### <a name="1.05.d  Improved security"></a> 1.05.d Improved security
+#### 1.05.d Improved security
 
 Firstly, AFS makes use of Kerberos to authenticate users. This improves security for several reasons:
 
@@ -154,7 +125,7 @@ Secondly, AFS uses access control lists (ACLs) to enable users to restrict acces
 
 Some (not all) implmentations of NFS version 3 can use Kerberos authentication; NFS version 4 adds ACLs, but not all NFS4 implementations interoperate well. Additionally, configuring NFS to use Kerberos, even when it is supported, is often painful and can lead to interoperability problems.
 
-#### <a name="1.05.e  Single systems image (SS"></a> 1.05.e Single systems image (SSI)
+#### 1.05.e Single systems image (SSI)
 
 Establishing the same view of filestore from each client and server in a network of systems (that comprise an AFS cell) is an order of magnitude simpler with AFS than it is with, say, NFS.
 
@@ -192,7 +163,7 @@ It is not necessary for the San Francisco system administrator to give Mr. Fudd
 1. on the same network as his cell and
 2. his `ny.acme.com` cell is mounted in the `sf.acme.com` cell (as would certainly be the case in a company with two cells).
 
-#### <a name="1.05.f  Replicated AFS volumes"></a> 1.05.f Replicated AFS volumes
+#### 1.05.f Replicated AFS volumes
 
 AFS files are stored in structures called volumes. These volumes reside on the disks of the AFS file server machines. Volumes containing frequently accessed data can be read-only replicated on several servers.
 
@@ -200,7 +171,7 @@ Cache managers (on users client workstations) will make use of replicate volumes
 
 An AFS client workstation will access the closest volume copy. By placing replicate volumes on servers closer to clients (eg on same physical LAN) access to those resources is improved and network traffic reduced.
 
-#### <a name="1.05.g  Improved robustness to s"></a> 1.05.g Improved robustness to server crash
+#### 1.05.g Improved robustness to server crash
 
 The Cache Manager maintains local copies of remotely accessed files. This is accomplished in the cache by breaking files into chunks of up to 64k (default chunk size). So, for a large file, there may be several chunks in the cache but a small file will occupy a single chunk (which will be only as big as is needed).
 
@@ -210,17 +181,17 @@ If a fileserver crashes, the client's locally cached file copies remain readable
 
 Also, if the AFS configuration has included replicated read-only volumes then alternate fileservers can satisfy requests for files from those volumes.
 
-#### <a name="1.05.h  &quot;Easy to use&quot; networking"></a> 1.05.h "Easy to use" networking
+#### 1.05.h "Easy to use" networking
 
 Accessing remote file resources via the network becomes much simpler when using AFS. Users have much less to worry about: want to move a file from a remote site? Just copy it to a different part of /afs.
 
 Once you have wide-area AFS in place, you don't have to keep local copies of files. Let AFS fetch and cache those files when you need them.
 
-#### <a name="1.05.i  Communications protocol"></a> 1.05.i Communications protocol
+#### 1.05.i Communications protocol
 
 The AFS communications protocol is optimized for Wide Area Networks. Retransmitting only the single bad packet in a batch of packets and allowing the number of unacknowledged packets to be higher (than in other protocols, see [[[Johnson90|FurtherReading#Johnson90]]]).
 
-#### <a name="1.05.j  Improved system manageme"></a> 1.05.j Improved system management capability
+#### 1.05.j Improved system management capability
 
 Systems administrators are able to make configuration changes from any client in the AFS cell (it is not necessary to login to a fileserver).
 
@@ -240,7 +211,7 @@ All this happened with users on client workstations continuing to use the cell's
 
 Finally, the AFS clients were moved - this was noticed!
 
-### <a name="1.06  Which systems is AFS avail"></a> 1.06 Which systems is AFS available for?
+### 1.06 Which systems is AFS available for?
 
 [[OpenAFS]], as of the 1.6.2 release for Unix and 1.7.24 for Windows, is currently available in binary releases for:
 
@@ -255,7 +226,7 @@ Finally, the AFS clients were moved - this was noticed!
 
 These are only the platforms for which official binary releases are prepared; it can be built from source for a large number of additional platforms including HP-UX, SGI, OpenBSD, NetBSD, and older releases and other CPU architectures of supported platforms.
 
-### <a name="1.07  What does &quot;ls /afs&quot; displa"></a> 1.07 What does `ls /afs` display in the Internet AFS filetree?
+### 1.07 What does `ls /afs` display in the Internet AFS filetree?
 
 Essentially this displays the AFS cells that co-operate in the Internet AFS filetree.
 
@@ -267,7 +238,7 @@ Note that it is also possible to use AFS "behind the firewall" within the confin
 
 Indeed, there are lots of benefits of using AFS on a local area network without using the WAN capabilities.
 
-### <a name="1.08  Why does AFS use Kerberos"></a><a name="1.08  Why does AFS use Kerberos "></a> 1.08 Why does AFS use Kerberos authentication?
+### 1.08 Why does AFS use Kerberos authentication?
 
 It improves security.
 
@@ -297,7 +268,7 @@ Originally AFS shipped with its own version of Kerberos 4, called `kaserver`. `k
 
 For more detail on this and other Kerberos issues see the faq for Kerberos (posted to `news.answers` and `comp.protocols.kerberos`) [[[Jaspan|FurtherReading#Jaspan]]]. (Also, see [[[Miller87|FurtherReading#Miller87]]], [[[Bryant88|FurtherReading#Bryant88]]], [[[Bellovin90|FurtherReading#Bellovin90]]], [[[Steiner88|FurtherReading#Steiner88]]])
 
-### <a name="1.09  Does AFS work over protoco"></a> 1.09 Does AFS work over protocols other than UDP?
+### 1.09 Does AFS work over protocols other than UDP?
 
 No. AFS was designed to work over UDP, and does not use TCP.
 
@@ -306,7 +277,7 @@ There is some work being done (see
 allow AFS to make use of other network transports, including TCP, but this is
 still experimental and undergoing development.
 
-### <a name="1.10  How can I access AFS from"></a><a name="1.10  How can I access AFS from "></a> 1.10 How can I access AFS from my PC?
+### 1.10 How can I access AFS from my PC?
 
 You can use [[OpenAFS]] for Windows client. In the past year it has become very stable and robust. [[OAfW]] works with Kerberos for Windows in much the same way the Unix clients work with Kerberos.
 
@@ -314,7 +285,7 @@ There is also [[Samba|http://www.samba.org]], an SMB server for UNIX. There are
 
 Mac OS X and Linux users might find [[`sshfs`|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SSHFS]] useful in some circumstances.
 
-### <a name="1.11  How does AFS compare with"></a><a name="1.11  How does AFS compare with "></a> 1.11 How does AFS compare with NFS?
+### 1.11 How does AFS compare with NFS?
 
 <table border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0">
   <tr>
index db813d2..6d8d780 100644 (file)
@@ -1,61 +1,6 @@
-<div>
-  <ul>
-    <li><a href="#Installing Additional Server Mac">Installing Additional Server Machines</a></li>
-    <li><a href="#Installing an Additional File Se">Installing an Additional File Server Machine</a></li>
-    <li><a href="#Creating AFS Directories and Per"> Creating AFS Directories and Performing Platform-Specific Procedures</a></li>
-    <li><a href="#Getting Started on AIX Systems"> Getting Started on AIX Systems</a><ul>
-        <li><a href="#Replacing the fsck Program Helpe"> Replacing the fsck Program Helper on AIX Systems</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#Configuring Server Volumes on AI"> Configuring Server Volumes on AIX Systems</a></li>
-      </ul>
-    </li>
-    <li><a href="#Getting Started on Digital UNIX"> Getting Started on Digital UNIX Systems</a><ul>
-        <li><a href="#Replacing the fsck Program on Di"> Replacing the fsck Program on Digital UNIX Systems</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#Configuring Server Volumes on Di"> Configuring Server Volumes on Digital UNIX Systems</a></li>
-      </ul>
-    </li>
-    <li><a href="#Getting Started on HP-UX Systems"> Getting Started on HP-UX Systems</a><ul>
-        <li><a href="#Configuring the AFS-modified fsc"> Configuring the AFS-modified fsck Program on HP-UX Systems</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#Configuring Server Volumes on HP"> Configuring Server Volumes on HP-UX Systems</a></li>
-      </ul>
-    </li>
-    <li><a href="#Getting Started on IRIX Systems"> Getting Started on IRIX Systems</a><ul>
-        <li><a href="#Configuring Server Volumes on IR"> Configuring Server Volumes on IRIX Systems</a></li>
-      </ul>
-    </li>
-    <li><a href="#Getting Started on Linux Systems"> Getting Started on Linux Systems</a><ul>
-        <li><a href="#Configuring Server Volumes on Li"> Configuring Server Volumes on Linux Systems</a></li>
-      </ul>
-    </li>
-    <li><a href="#Getting Started on Solaris Syste"> Getting Started on Solaris Systems</a><ul>
-        <li><a href="#Configuring the AFS-modified fsc"> Configuring the AFS-modified fsck Program on Solaris Systems</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#Configuring Server Volumes On So"> Configuring Server Volumes On Solaris</a></li>
-      </ul>
-    </li>
-    <li><a href="#Starting Server Programs">Starting Server Programs</a></li>
-    <li><a href="#Installing Client Functionality"> Installing Client Functionality</a></li>
-    <li><a href="#Completing the Installation"> Completing the Installation</a><ul>
-        <li><a href="#On AIX systems:"> On AIX systems:</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#On Digital UNIX systems:"> On Digital UNIX systems:</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#On HP-UX systems:"> On HP-UX systems:</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#On IRIX systems:"> On IRIX systems:</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#On Linux systems:"> On Linux systems:</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#On Solaris systems:"> On Solaris systems:</a></li>
-      </ul>
-    </li>
-    <li><a href="#Installing Database Server Funct">Installing Database Server Functionality</a><ul>
-        <li><a href="#Summary of Procedures">Summary of Procedures</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#Instructions">Instructions</a></li>
-      </ul>
-    </li>
-    <li><a href="#Removing Database Server Functio">Removing Database Server Functionality</a><ul>
-        <li><a href="#Summary of Procedures">Summary of Procedures</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#Instructions">Instructions</a></li>
-      </ul>
-    </li>
-  </ul>
-</div>
-
-# <a name="Installing Additional Server Mac"></a> Installing Additional Server Machines
+[[!toc levels=3]]
+
+# Installing Additional Server Machines
 
 Instructions for the following procedures appear in the indicated section of this chapter.
 
@@ -79,7 +24,7 @@ The instructions make the following assumptions.
 
 - All files on the CD-ROM are owned by root. i.e. The files that you install should be owned by root, or the standard application user for the system.
 
-# <a name="Installing an Additional File Se"></a> Installing an Additional File Server Machine
+# Installing an Additional File Server Machine
 
 The procedure for installing a new file server machine is similar to installing the first file server machine in your cell. There are a few parts of the installation that differ depending on whether the machine is the same AFS system type as an existing file server machine or is the first file server machine of its system type in your cell. The differences mostly concern the source for the needed binaries and files, and what portions of the Update Server you install:
 
@@ -109,7 +54,7 @@ To install a new file server machine, perform the following procedures:
 
 After completing the instructions in this section, you can install database server functionality on the machine according to the instructions in Installing Database Server Functionality.
 
-# <a name="Creating AFS Directories and Per"></a> Creating AFS Directories and Performing Platform-Specific Procedures
+# Creating AFS Directories and Performing Platform-Specific Procedures
 
 Create the /usr/afs and /usr/vice/etc directories on the local disk. Subsequent instructions copy files from the AFS distribution CD-ROM into them, at the appropriate point for each system type.
 
@@ -147,17 +92,17 @@ To continue, proceed to the section for this system type:
 
 - Getting Started on Solaris Systems
 
-# <a name="Getting Started on AIX Systems"></a> Getting Started on AIX Systems
+# Getting Started on AIX Systems
 
 [[Loading AFS into the AIX Kernel|LoadingAFSIntoTheAIXKernel]]
 
-## <a name="Replacing the fsck Program Helpe"></a> Replacing the fsck Program Helper on AIX Systems
+## Replacing the fsck Program Helper on AIX Systems
 
 Never run the standard fsck program on AFS server partitions. It discards AFS volumes.
 
 [[Replacing the fsck Program Helper on AIX Systems|ReplacingTheFsckProgramHelperOnAIXSystems]]
 
-## <a name="Configuring Server Volumes on AI"></a> Configuring Server Volumes on AIX Systems
+## Configuring Server Volumes on AIX Systems
 
 If this system is going to be used as a file server to share some of its disk space, create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). If it is not going to be a file server you can skip this step.
 
@@ -167,7 +112,7 @@ If the machine is to remain an AFS client, incorporate AFS into its authenticati
 
 Proceed to Starting Server Programs.
 
-# <a name="Getting Started on Digital UNIX"></a><a name="Getting Started on Digital UNIX "></a> Getting Started on Digital UNIX Systems
+# Getting Started on Digital UNIX Systems
 
 Begin by building AFS modifications into the kernel, then configure server partitions and replace the Digital UNIX fsck program with a version that correctly handles AFS volumes.
 
@@ -175,13 +120,13 @@ If the machine's hardware and software configuration exactly matches another Dig
 
 [[Building AFS into the Digital UNIX Kernel|BuildingAFSIntoTheDigitalUNIXKernel]]
 
-## <a name="Replacing the fsck Program on Di"></a> Replacing the fsck Program on Digital UNIX Systems
+## Replacing the fsck Program on Digital UNIX Systems
 
 Never run the standard fsck program on AFS server partitions. It discards AFS volumes.
 
 [[Replacing the fsck Program on Digital UNIX Systems|ReplacingTheFsckProgramOnDigitalUNIXSystems]]
 
-## <a name="Configuring Server Volumes on Di"></a> Configuring Server Volumes on Digital UNIX Systems
+## Configuring Server Volumes on Digital UNIX Systems
 
 If this system is going to be used as a file server to share some of its disk space, create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). If it is not going to be a file server you can skip this step.
 
@@ -191,19 +136,19 @@ If the machine is to remain an AFS client, incorporate AFS into its authenticati
 
 Proceed to Starting Server Programs.
 
-# <a name="Getting Started on HP-UX Systems"></a> Getting Started on HP-UX Systems
+# Getting Started on HP-UX Systems
 
 Begin by building AFS modifications into the kernel, then configure server partitions and replace the HP-UX fsck program with a version that correctly handles AFS volumes.
 
 [[Building AFS into the HP-UX Kernel|BuildingAFSIntoTheHP-UXKernel]]
 
-## <a name="Configuring the AFS-modified fsc"></a> Configuring the AFS-modified fsck Program on HP-UX Systems
+## Configuring the AFS-modified fsck Program on HP-UX Systems
 
 Never run the standard fsck program on AFS server partitions. It discards AFS volumes.
 
 [[Configuring the AFS-modified fsck Program on HP-UX Systems|ConfiguringTheAFS-modifiedFsckProgramOnHP-UXSystems]]
 
-## <a name="Configuring Server Volumes on HP"></a> Configuring Server Volumes on HP-UX Systems
+## Configuring Server Volumes on HP-UX Systems
 
 If this system is going to be used as a file server to share some of its disk space, create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). If it is not going to be a file server you can skip this step.
 
@@ -213,7 +158,7 @@ If the machine is to remain an AFS client, incorporate AFS into its authenticati
 
 Proceed to Starting Server Programs.
 
-# <a name="Getting Started on IRIX Systems"></a> Getting Started on IRIX Systems
+# Getting Started on IRIX Systems
 
 Begin by incorporating AFS modifications into the kernel. Either use the ml dynamic loader program, or build a static kernel. Then configure partitions to house AFS volumes. AFS supports use of both EFS and XFS partitions for housing AFS volumes. SGI encourages use of XFS partitions.
 
@@ -221,7 +166,7 @@ You do not need to replace IRIX fsck program, because the version that SGI distr
 
 [[Loading AFS into the IRIX Kernel|LoadingAFSIntoTheIRIXKernel]]
 
-## <a name="Configuring Server Volumes on IR"></a> Configuring Server Volumes on IRIX Systems
+## Configuring Server Volumes on IRIX Systems
 
 If this system is going to be used as a file server to share some of its disk space, create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). If it is not going to be a file server you can skip this step.
 
@@ -231,11 +176,11 @@ If this system is going to be used as a file server to share some of its disk sp
 
 1. Proceed to Starting Server Programs.
 
-# <a name="Getting Started on Linux Systems"></a> Getting Started on Linux Systems
+# Getting Started on Linux Systems
 
 [[Loading AFS into the Linux Kernel|LoadingAFSIntoTheLinuxKernel]]
 
-## <a name="Configuring Server Volumes on Li"></a> Configuring Server Volumes on Linux Systems
+## Configuring Server Volumes on Linux Systems
 
 If this system is going to be used as a file server to share some of its disk space, create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). If it is not going to be a file server you can skip this step.
 
@@ -245,17 +190,17 @@ If the machine is to remain an AFS client, incorporate AFS into its authenticati
 
 Proceed to Starting Server Programs.
 
-# <a name="Getting Started on Solaris Syste"></a> Getting Started on Solaris Systems
+# Getting Started on Solaris Systems
 
 [[Loading AFS into the Solaris Kernel|LoadingAFSIntoTheSolarisKernel]]
 
-## <a name="Configuring the AFS-modified fsc"></a> Configuring the AFS-modified fsck Program on Solaris Systems
+## Configuring the AFS-modified fsck Program on Solaris Systems
 
 Never run the standard fsck program on AFS server partitions. It discards AFS volumes.
 
 [[Configuring the AFS-modified fsck Program on Solaris Systems|ConfiguringTheAFS-modifiedFsckProgramOnSolarisSystems]]
 
-## <a name="Configuring Server Volumes On So"></a> Configuring Server Volumes On Solaris
+## Configuring Server Volumes On Solaris
 
 If this system is going to be used as a file server to share some of its disk space, create a directory called /vicepxx for each AFS server partition you are configuring (there must be at least one). If it is not going to be a file server you can skip this step.
 
@@ -265,7 +210,7 @@ If the machine is to remain an AFS client, incorporate AFS into its authenticati
 
 Proceed to Starting Server Programs.
 
-# <a name="Starting Server Programs"></a> Starting Server Programs
+# Starting Server Programs
 
 In this section you initialize the BOS Server, the Update Server, the controller process for NTPD, and the fs process. You begin by copying the necessary server files to the local disk.
 
@@ -279,9 +224,8 @@ In this section you initialize the BOS Server, the Update Server, the controller
 
 - - Copy files from the CD-ROM to the local /usr/afs directory.
 
-       # cd /cdrom/<sys_version>/dest/root.server/usr/afs
-
-       # cp -rp  *  /usr/afs
+    `# cd /cdrom/<sys_version>/dest/root.server/usr/afs`
+    `# cp -rp  *  /usr/afs`
 
 1. Copy the contents of the /usr/afs/etc directory from an existing file server machine, using a remote file transfer protocol such as ftp or NFS. If you use a system control machine, it is best to copy the contents of its /usr/afs/etc directory. If you choose not to run a system control machine, copy the directory's contents from any existing file server machine.
 
@@ -295,6 +239,7 @@ In this section you initialize the BOS Server, the Update Server, the controller
 
 By default, the Update Server performs updates every 300 seconds (five minutes). Use the -t argument to specify a different number of seconds. For the machine name argument, substitute the name of the machine you are installing. The command appears on multiple lines here only for legibility reasons.
 
+
        # ./bos create  <machine name> upclientetc simple  \
              "/usr/afs/bin/upclient  <system control machine>  \
              [-t  <time>]  /usr/afs/etc" -cell  <cell name>  -noauth
@@ -303,6 +248,7 @@ By default, the Update Server performs updates every 300 seconds (five minutes).
 
 \* If this is the first file server machine of its AFS system type, create the upserver process as an instance of the server portion of the Update Server. It distributes its copy of the file server process binaries to the other file server machines of this system type that you install in future. Creating this process makes this machine the binary distribution machine for its type.
 
+
        # ./bos create  <machine name> upserver  simple  \
              "/usr/afs/bin/upserver -clear /usr/afs/bin"   \
              -cell <cell name>  -noauth
@@ -321,6 +267,7 @@ By default, the Update Server performs updates every 300 seconds (five minutes).
 
        # ./bos create  <machine name> runntp simple  \
              /usr/afs/bin/runntp -cell <cell name>  -noauth
+
 <dl>
   <dd>
     <dl>
@@ -338,7 +285,7 @@ Attempting to run multiple instances of the NTPD causes an error. Running NTPD t
              /usr/afs/bin/fileserver /usr/afs/bin/volserver  \
              /usr/afs/bin/salvager -cell <cell name>  -noauth
 
-# <a name="Installing Client Functionality"></a> Installing Client Functionality
+# Installing Client Functionality
 
 If you want this machine to be a client as well as a server, follow the instructions in this section. Otherwise, skip to Completing the Installation.
 
@@ -394,7 +341,7 @@ On some system types that use a dynamic kernel loader program, you previously co
 
 1. If appropriate, follow the instructions in Storing AFS Binaries in AFS to copy the AFS binaries for this system type into an AFS volume. See the introduction to this section for further discussion.
 
-# <a name="Completing the Installation"></a> Completing the Installation
+# Completing the Installation
 
 At this point you run the machine's AFS initialization script to verify that it correctly loads AFS modifications into the kernel and starts the BOS Server, which starts the other server processes. If you have installed client files, the script also starts the Cache Manager. If the script works correctly, perform the steps that incorporate it into the machine's startup and shutdown sequence. If there are problems during the initialization, attempt to resolve them. The AFS Product Support group can provide assistance if necessary.
 
@@ -412,37 +359,37 @@ If the machine is configured as a client using a disk cache, it can take a while
 
 1. Run the AFS initialization script by issuing the appropriate commands for this system type.
 
-## <a name="On AIX systems:"></a> On AIX systems:
+## On AIX systems:
 
 [[Initialization Script on AIX|InitializationScriptOnAIX]]
 
 Proceed to Step 4.
 
-## <a name="On Digital UNIX systems:"></a> On Digital UNIX systems:
+## On Digital UNIX systems:
 
 [[Initialization Script on Digital UNIX|InitializationScriptOnDigitalUNIX]]
 
 Proceed to Step 4.
 
-## <a name="On HP-UX systems:"></a> On HP-UX systems:
+## On HP-UX systems:
 
 [[Initialization Script on HP-UX|InitializationScriptOnHP-UX]]
 
 Proceed to Step 4.
 
-## <a name="On IRIX systems:"></a> On IRIX systems:
+## On IRIX systems:
 
 [[Initialization Script on IRIX|InitializationScriptOnIRIX]]
 
 Proceed to Step 4.
 
-## <a name="On Linux systems:"></a> On Linux systems:
+## On Linux systems:
 
 [[Initialization Script on Linux|InitializationScriptOnLinux]]
 
 Proceed to Step 4.
 
-## <a name="On Solaris systems:"></a> On Solaris systems:
+## On Solaris systems:
 
 [[Initialization Script on Solaris|InitializationScriptOnSolaris]]
 
@@ -450,7 +397,7 @@ Step 4. Verify that /usr/afs and its subdirectories on the new file server machi
 
 1. To configure this machine as a database server machine, proceed to Installing Database Server Functionality.
 
-# <a name="Installing Database Server Funct"></a> Installing Database Server Functionality
+# Installing Database Server Functionality
 
 This section explains how to install database server functionality. Database server machines have two defining characteristics. First, they run the Authentication Server, Protection Server, and Volume Location (VL) Server processes. They also run the Backup Server if the cell uses the AFS Backup System, as is assumed in these instructions. Second, they appear in the [[CellServDB]] file of every machine in the cell (and of client machines in foreign cells, if they are to access files in this cell).
 
@@ -472,7 +419,7 @@ o If the new database server machine has a lower IP address than any existing da
 
 o If the new database server machine does not have the lowest IP address of any database server machine, then it is better to update clients after restarting the database server processes. Client machines do not start using the new database server machine until you update their kernel memory list, but that does not usually cause timeouts or update problems (because the new machine is not likely to become the coordinator).
 
-## <a name="Summary of Procedures"></a> Summary of Procedures
+## Summary of Procedures
 
 To install a database server machine, perform the following procedures.
 
@@ -490,7 +437,7 @@ To install a database server machine, perform the following procedures.
 
 1. Notify the AFS Product Support group that you have installed a new database server machine
 
-## <a name="Instructions"></a> Instructions
+## Instructions
 
 Note: It is assumed that your PATH environment variable includes the directory that houses the AFS command binaries. If not, you possibly need to precede the command names with the appropriate pathname.
 
@@ -546,7 +493,7 @@ There are several ways to update the [[CellServDB]] file on client machines, as
 
 10. Start the Volume Location (VL) Server (the vlserver process).
 
-       % bos create <machine name> vlserver simple /usr/afs/bin/vlserver
+       `% bos create <machine name> vlserver simple /usr/afs/bin/vlserver`
 
 11. Issue the bos restart command on every database server machine in the cell, including the new machine. The command restarts the Authentication, Backup, Protection, and VL Servers, which forces an election of a new Ubik coordinator for each process. The new machine votes in the election and is considered as a potential new coordinator.
 
@@ -568,11 +515,11 @@ If an error occurs, restart all server processes on the database server machines
 
 If you wish to participate in the AFS global name space, your cell's entry appear in a [[CellServDB]] file that the AFS Product Support group makes available to all AFS sites. Otherwise, they list your cell in a private file that they do not share with other AFS sites.
 
-# <a name="Removing Database Server Functio"></a> Removing Database Server Functionality
+# Removing Database Server Functionality
 
 Removing database server machine functionality is nearly the reverse of installing it.
 
-## <a name="Summary of Procedures"></a> Summary of Procedures
+## Summary of Procedures
 
 To decommission a database server machine, perform the following procedures.
 
@@ -590,7 +537,7 @@ To decommission a database server machine, perform the following procedures.
 
 1. Restart the database server processes on the remaining database server machines
 
-## <a name="Instructions"></a> Instructions
+## Instructions
 
 Note: It is assumed that your PATH environment variable includes the directory that houses the AFS command binaries. If not, you possibly need to precede the command names with the appropriate pathname.
 
index ec6dd6b..499a2c1 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,6 @@
-## <a name="4  Getting more information"></a> 4 Getting more information
+[[!toc levels=3]]
+
+## 4 Getting more information
 
 The Administration Section of the [[AFSFrequentlyAskedQuestions]].
 
@@ -6,34 +8,16 @@ The Administration Section of the [[AFSFrequentlyAskedQuestions]].
 - [[GeneralFAQ]]
 - [[UsageFAQ]]
 - [[AdminFAQ]]
-
-<div>
-  <ul>
-    <li><a href="#4  Getting more information"> 4 Getting more information</a><ul>
-        <li><a href="#4.03  Where can I get training i"> 4.03 Where can I get training in AFS?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#4.04  Where can I find AFS resou"> 4.04 Where can I find AFS resources in World Wide Web (WWW)?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#4.05  Is there a mailing list fo"> 4.05 Is there a mailing list for AFS topics?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#4.06  Where can I find an archiv"> 4.06 Where can I find an archive of <a href="mailto:info-afs@transarc.com">info-afs@transarc.com</a>?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#4.09  Gibt es eine deutsche AFS"> 4.09 Gibt es eine deutsche AFS Benutzer Gruppe?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#4.10  Donde puedo encontrar info"> 4.10 Donde puedo encontrar informacion en Espanol sobre AFS?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#4.11 Are there books on AFS?"> 4.11 Are there books on AFS?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#4.12 Where can I find tools to u"> 4.12 Where can I find tools to use with AFS?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#4.13 Where can I find stuff from"> 4.13 Where can I find stuff from the old transarc.com web site?</a></li>
-      </ul>
-    </li>
-  </ul>
-</div>
-
 - [[AboutTheFAQ]]
 - [[FurtherReading]]
 
-### <a name="4.03  Where can I get training i"></a> 4.03 Where can I get training in AFS?
+### 4.03 Where can I get training in AFS?
 
 IBM/Transarc has provided user and administrator courses. Those who have obtained it recently say that IBM is reluctant to provide training but will do so for a lot of money.
 
 Training in AFS has been offered recently at the LISA conference and at the AFS Best Practices Workshops, both offered annually. Keep an eye on <http://www.openafs.org> for news about future training in these venues.
 
-### <a name="4.04  Where can I find AFS resou"></a> 4.04 Where can I find AFS resources in World Wide Web (WWW)?
+### 4.04 Where can I find AFS resources in World Wide Web (WWW)?
 
 Here are some I have found (please let me know if you find more):
 
@@ -53,17 +37,17 @@ Here are some I have found (please let me know if you find more):
 
 - Gentoo Linux Documentation:<br /><http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/openafs.xml>
 
-### <a name="4.05  Is there a mailing list fo"></a> 4.05 Is there a mailing list for AFS topics?
+### 4.05 Is there a mailing list for AFS topics?
 
 There are a bunch of [[OpenAFS]] mailing lists. A list is available at <https://lists.openafs.org/mailman/listinfo/> .
 
 The [[OpenAFS]]-Info and [[OpenAFS]]-devel lists are probably the most active.
 
-### <a name="4.06  Where can I find an archiv"></a> 4.06 Where can I find an archive of <info-afs@transarc.com>?
+### 4.06 Where can I find an archive of <info-afs@transarc.com>?
 
 There is a web archive at: <http://diswww.mit.edu/menelaus/info-afs/>
 
-### <a name="4.09  Gibt es eine deutsche AFS"></a><a name="4.09  Gibt es eine deutsche AFS "></a> 4.09 Gibt es eine deutsche AFS Benutzer Gruppe?
+### 4.09 Gibt es eine deutsche AFS Benutzer Gruppe?
 
 Ja, wenn Sie mitmachen wollen, schicken Sie bitte eine E-Mail an:
 
@@ -71,21 +55,21 @@ Ja, wenn Sie mitmachen wollen, schicken Sie bitte eine E-Mail an:
 
 Ueber diese Adresse werden "subscribe" und "unsubscribe" Requests bearbeitet.
 
-### <a name="4.10  Donde puedo encontrar info"></a> 4.10 Donde puedo encontrar informacion en Espanol sobre AFS?
+### 4.10 Donde puedo encontrar informacion en Espanol sobre AFS?
 
 Hay algunas notas en Espanol sobre AFS en: <http://w3.ing.puc.cl/~cet/afs.html>
 
-### <a name="4.11 Are there books on AFS?"></a> 4.11 Are there books on AFS?
+### 4.11 Are there books on AFS?
 
 "Managing AFS: The Andrew File System" by Richard Campbell was published by Prentice-Hall in February, 1998. It is supposedly out of print, but somehow there is always a copy or two available from Amazon [here.](http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0138027293/qid%3D1023720253/ref%3Dsr%5F11%5F0%5F1/104-0953845-2989550.)
 
 Recently a new book has come out, "Distributed Services with [[OpenAFS]]: for Enterprise and Education" by Wolfgang A. Gehrke and Franco Milicchio. It's also available [through Amazon](http://www.amazon.com/Distributed-Services-OpenAFS-Enterprise-Education/dp/3540366334/ref=pd_sim_b) and probably through most other on-line and brick-and-mortar stores. I (Steve Simmons) checked with a co-worker who has read it. He describes it as good for people who've not seen AFS before and might be setting up from scratch.
 
-### <a name="4.12 Where can I find tools to u"></a> 4.12 Where can I find tools to use with AFS?
+### 4.12 Where can I find tools to use with AFS?
 
 A collection of AFS management tools used at Stanford University can be found at <http://www.eyrie.org/~eagle/software/> in the AFS section. Included in this collection are tools for handling volume creation, volume deletion, and migrating volumes, a tool for comparing read/write and read-only volumes, tools for monitoring AFS with Nagios, tools for tracking mount point locations for volumes, and some user utilities like a recursive wrapper around fs and a utility to find mount points in a file tree.
 
-### <a name="4.13 Where can I find stuff from"></a> 4.13 Where can I find stuff from the old transarc.com web site?
+### 4.13 Where can I find stuff from the old transarc.com web site?
 
 Many of the links to transarc.com in the FAQ, and around the web are broken. The best bet seems to be to use the [Wayback Machine](http://web.archive.org) to search the Internet Archive for old versions of the pages from transarc.com and transarc.ibm.com. Here is one place to start, but things are sometimes missing so you may have to search for older copies and alternate paths.
 
index 7fb5b98..fa28bcb 100644 (file)
@@ -1,47 +1,17 @@
-## <a name="2  Using AFS"></a> 2 Using AFS
+[[!toc levels=3]]
+
+## 2 Using AFS
 
 The Usage Section of the [[AFSFrequentlyAskedQuestions]].
 
 - [[PreambleFAQ]]
 - [[GeneralFAQ]]
-
-<div>
-  <ul>
-    <li><a href="#2  Using AFS"> 2 Using AFS</a><ul>
-        <li><a href="#2.01  What are the differences b"> 2.01 What are the differences between AFS and a Unix filesystem?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#2.02  What is an AFS protection"> 2.02 What is an AFS protection group?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#2.03  What are the AFS defined p"> 2.03 What are the AFS-defined protection groups?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#2.04  What is an AFS access cont"> 2.04 What is an AFS access control list (ACL)?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#2.05  What are the AFS access ri"> 2.05 What are the AFS access rights?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#2.06  What is pagsh?"> 2.06 What is <code>pagsh</code>?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#2.07  Why use a PAG?"> 2.07 Why use a PAG?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#2.08  How can I tell if I have a"> 2.08 How can I tell if I have a PAG?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#2.09  Can I still run cron jobs"> 2.09 Can I still run <code>cron</code> jobs with AFS?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#2.10  How much disk space does a"> 2.10 How much disk space does a 1-byte file occupy in AFS?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#2.11  Is it possible to specify"> 2.11 Is it possible to specify a user who is external to the current AFS cell on an ACL?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#2.12  Are there any problems pri"> 2.12 Are there any problems printing files in <code>/afs</code>?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#2.13  Can I create a fifo (aka n"> 2.13 Can I create a FIFO (a/k/a named pipe) in <code>/afs</code>?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#2.14  If an AFS server crashes,"> 2.14 If an AFS server crashes, do I have to reboot my AFS client?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#2.15  Can I use AFS on my diskle"> 2.15 Can I use AFS on my diskless workstation?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#2.16  Can I test for AFS tokens"> 2.16 Can I test for AFS tokens from within my program?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#2.17  What's the difference betw"> 2.17 What's the difference between <code>/afs/cellname</code> and <code>/afs/.cellname</code>?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#2.18  Can I klog as two users on"> 2.18 Can I <code>aklog</code> as two users on a machine in the same cell?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#2.19  What are the ~/._afsXXXX f"> 2.19 What are the <code>~/.__afsXXXX</code> files?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#2.20  How do you set up IP-based"> 2.20 How do you set up IP-based ACLs?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#2.21 What meaning do the owner,"> 2.21 What meaning do the owner, group, and mode bits have in AFS?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#2.22 What are "dropboxes"?"> 2.22 What are "dropboxes"?</a></li>
-        <li><a href="#2.23 Can I access a RW-Volume">2.23 Can I access a RW volume using the RO path?</a></li>
-      </ul>
-    </li>
-  </ul>
-</div>
-
 - [[AdminFAQ]]
 - [[ResourcesFAQ]]
 - [[AboutTheFAQ]]
 - [[FurtherReading]]
 
-### <a name="2.01  What are the differences b"></a> 2.01 What are the differences between AFS and a Unix filesystem?
+### 2.01 What are the differences between AFS and a Unix filesystem?
 
 Essentially, from a user's point of view, there is little difference between AFS and local Unix filestore. Nearly all the commands normally used to access local files can be used to access files in `/afs`.
 
@@ -130,7 +100,7 @@ AFS supports advisory locking of an entire file with `flock()`. Processes on the
 
 AFS does not support character and block special files. The `mknod` command does not create either character or block special files under `/afs`.
 
-### <a name="2.02  What is an AFS protection"></a><a name="2.02  What is an AFS protection "></a> 2.02 What is an AFS protection group?
+### 2.02 What is an AFS protection group?
 
 A named list of users.
 
@@ -144,7 +114,7 @@ An AFS group typically has the format `owner-id:group-name`. By default, only th
 
 It is possible to have both users and IP addresses as members of an AFS group. By using an IP address like this you can specify all the users from the host with that IP address. Note that IP address membership is insecure, due to the possibility of packet spoofing and the inability of current AFS protocols to protect server communications that do not involve a user-based security token; the `rxgk` security protocol currently under development will enable token-protected access at the client machine level as well as the user level.
 
-### <a name="2.03  What are the AFS defined p"></a> 2.03 What are the AFS-defined protection groups?
+### 2.03 What are the AFS-defined protection groups?
 
 - `system:anyuser`
   - Everyone who has access to an AFS client in any cell that is on the same network as your cell.
@@ -155,7 +125,7 @@ It is possible to have both users and IP addresses as members of an AFS group. B
 - `system:administrators`
   - Users who have privileges to execute some but not all system administrator commands.
 
-### <a name="2.04  What is an AFS access cont"></a> 2.04 What is an AFS access control list (ACL)?
+### 2.04 What is an AFS access control list (ACL)?
 
 There is an ACL for every directory in AFS. The ACL specifies protection at the directory level (not file level) by listing permissions of users and/or groups to a directory. There is a maximum of 20 entries on an ACL.
 
@@ -179,7 +149,7 @@ The members of `fac:coords` can be determined by accessing the protection group
       roadrunner
       yosemite.sam
 
-### <a name="2.05  What are the AFS access ri"></a> 2.05 What are the AFS access rights?
+### 2.05 What are the AFS access rights?
 
 In AFS, there are seven access rights that may be set or not set:
 
@@ -246,7 +216,7 @@ There are shorthand forms for some common permission combinations:
   </tr>
 </table>
 
-### <a name="2.06  What is pagsh?"></a> 2.06 What is `pagsh`?
+### 2.06 What is `pagsh`?
 
 A command to get a new shell with a process authentication group (PAG).
 
@@ -254,7 +224,7 @@ This is normally used if your system does not get AFS tokens on login. It is use
 
 The PAG uniquely identifies the user to the Cache Manager. Without a PAG, the Cache Manager uses the Unix UID to identify a user and tokens will be shared across all processes owned by that UID.
 
-### <a name="2.07  Why use a PAG?"></a> 2.07 Why use a PAG?
+### 2.07 Why use a PAG?
 
 There are two reasons:
 
@@ -262,7 +232,7 @@ There are two reasons:
 
 1. For security: if you don't have a PAG, then the Cache Manager identifies you by Unix UID. Another user with `root` access to the client could `su` to you and thereby use your token.
 
-### <a name="2.08  How can I tell if I have a"></a> 2.08 How can I tell if I have a PAG?
+### 2.08 How can I tell if I have a PAG?
 
 Usually you can tell if you have a PAG by typing `id`. (Platforms which are derived directly from AT&T System V Release 4, such as Solaris, will not show the additional group vector by default; if there is no `groups=` section in the output of `id`, try `id -a`.) A PAG is indicated by the appearance of one or two large integers in the list of groups.
 
@@ -280,7 +250,7 @@ On Linux clients, your PAG may not show up as such a group in the group list. An
 
 If you see an `afs_pag` key in the output, then you are in a PAG.
 
-### <a name="2.09  Can I still run cron jobs"></a><a name="2.09  Can I still run cron jobs "></a> 2.09 Can I still run `cron` jobs with AFS?
+### 2.09 Can I still run `cron` jobs with AFS?
 
 Yes, but remember that in order to fully access files in AFS you have to be AFS authenticated. If your `cron` job doesn't `aklog` then it only gets `system:anyuser` access.
 
@@ -290,15 +260,15 @@ Note that you can still run a `cron` job without getting a token, if the task do
 
     0 7 * * * $sys_anyuser_readable_dir/7AMdaily 2>/dev/null
 
-### <a name="2.10  How much disk space does a"></a> 2.10 How much disk space does a 1-byte file occupy in AFS?
+### 2.10 How much disk space does a 1-byte file occupy in AFS?
 
 This varies depending on the filesystem used by the fileserver containing that file. Some filesystems may only use up 1024 bytes for such a file, and others may use 4096; still others may use more or fewer bytes.
 
-### <a name="2.11  Is it possible to specify"></a><a name="2.11  Is it possible to specify "></a> 2.11 Is it possible to specify a user who is external to the current AFS cell on an ACL?
+### 2.11 Is it possible to specify a user who is external to the current AFS cell on an ACL?
 
 Yes. This requires setting up a cross-realm relationship with the Kerberos realm on the remote site, but this is possible. Typically you refer to "remote" users like `user@remote.cell`, and you can use them in ACLs, or add them to `pts` groups.
 
-### <a name="2.12  Are there any problems pri"></a> 2.12 Are there any problems printing files in `/afs`?
+### 2.12 Are there any problems printing files in `/afs`?
 
 There are two common issues that come up with printing from AFS:
 
@@ -314,11 +284,11 @@ Both of these may be mitigated by using shell redirection to send the file to th
 
 Very few print services have the ability to manage token access in a way that allows an ACL-protected file to be printed by pathname without enabling access control to be subverted by users by means of the print service. It is **not** recommended to grant the print service general access to AFS by means of [[kstart|http://www.eyrie.org/software/kstart/]] or similar mechanisms.
 
-### <a name="2.13  Can I create a fifo (aka n"></a> 2.13 Can I create a FIFO (a/k/a named pipe) in `/afs`?
+### 2.13 Can I create a FIFO (a/k/a named pipe) in `/afs`?
 
 No. AFS does not support `mknod fifofile p`. AFS only supports normal files, directories, and symlinks; not Unix- or Windows-specific filesystem node types.
 
-### <a name="2.14  If an AFS server crashes,"></a><a name="2.14  If an AFS server crashes, "></a> 2.14 If an AFS server crashes, do I have to reboot my AFS client?
+### 2.14 If an AFS server crashes, do I have to reboot my AFS client?
 
 No.
 
@@ -340,23 +310,23 @@ If you are accessing [[ReadWrite]] volumes on a crashed server then you will not
 
 You don't need to reboot, and the Cache Manager activity is "invisible" to the user. You may want to speed up recovery by issuing the command `fs checkservers`, but even this is unnecessary and will usually only improve recovery by a few seconds.
 
-### <a name="2.15  Can I use AFS on my diskle"></a> 2.15 Can I use AFS on my diskless workstation?
+### 2.15 Can I use AFS on my diskless workstation?
 
 Yes. The AFS Cache Manager can be configured to work with either a disk based cache or a memory (RAM) based cache.
 
 Note that using a memory cache may not be as fast as you might think. Modern operating systems should cache disk data in memory when accessed, so using a disk cache should mean you are hitting RAM most of the time anyway. Disk caches are also much more common, and thus much more heavily tested, and so are better optimized. If you have a local disk and it's reasonably fast, usually going with a disk cache is preferable to memory cache. Additionally, most operating systems do a better job of optimizing a native RAM disk, so you might consider putting your AFS cache in a RAM disk instead of using [[OpenAFS]]'s own memory cache.
 
-### <a name="2.16  Can I test for AFS tokens"></a><a name="2.16  Can I test for AFS tokens "></a> 2.16 Can I test for AFS tokens from within my program?
+### 2.16 Can I test for AFS tokens from within my program?
 
 Yes. However, the mechanism for doing so varies depending on the platform. To see examples of how to do this, you can look at the source of any program that deals with AFS tokens. One such example is [pam-afs-session](http://www.eyrie.org/~eagle/software/pam-afs-session/)
 
-### <a name="2.17  What&#39;s the difference betw"></a> 2.17 What's the difference between `/afs/cellname` and `/afs/.cellname`?
+### 2.17 What's the difference between `/afs/cellname` and `/afs/.cellname`?
 
 AFS has [[ReadOnly]] (RO) and [[ReadWrite]] (RW) volumes.
 
 The convention in AFS is to mount the RW volume `root.cell` as `/afs/.cellname` and the RO volume `root.cell.readonly` as `/afs/cellname`. This is so that when you travel down the `/afs/.cellname` link, AFS will always use the RW site of any volumes that have RO clones. This allows your administrator to update the RW copy of a volume and `vos release $volname` so that it will appear in `/afs/cellname`.
 
-### <a name="2.18  Can I klog as two users on"></a> 2.18 Can I `aklog` as two users on a machine in the same cell?
+### 2.18 Can I `aklog` as two users on a machine in the same cell?
 
 Yes, *if* you use two different PAGs. The token store only supports one token per cell per authentication group; with UID-based PAGs, this means one token per cell per user, but with PAGs you can have multiple shell windows/sessions, each with its own PAG and associated AFS tokens.
 
@@ -364,7 +334,7 @@ Note that most Kerberos implementations (the one on Mac OS X 10.7 and 10.8 being
 
 An alternative to using multiple users in this way is to use ACLs to grant access on a shared directory to both users.
 
-### <a name="2.19  What are the ~/._afsXXXX f"></a> 2.19 What are the `~/.__afsXXXX` files?
+### 2.19 What are the `~/.__afsXXXX` files?
 
 They are temporary reference files used by the AFS Cache Manager.
 
@@ -374,11 +344,11 @@ Some applications rely on that feature, e.g. they create a temporary file and re
 
 Newer versions of AFS rename such files to `.__afsXXXX`, thus making sure that the data stays around as expected by the application. As soon as the file gets closed, the associated `.__afsXXXX` should disappear.
 
-### <a name="2.20  How do you set up IP-based"></a> 2.20 How do you set up IP-based ACLs?
+### 2.20 How do you set up IP-based ACLs?
 
 See [[IPAccessControl]].
 
-### <a name="2.21 What meaning do the owner,"></a><a name="2.21 What meaning do the owner, "></a> 2.21 What meaning do the owner, group, and mode bits have in AFS?
+### 2.21 What meaning do the owner, group, and mode bits have in AFS?
 
 In order to appear more like a local filesystem, AFS will faithfully store the numeric UID (owner), GID (group), for both files and directories, as well as the permission bits (read, write, and execute for user, group, and other, plus `setuid`, `setgid`, and "sticky" bits) for files. Note that permission bits for directories are not stored.
 
@@ -408,7 +378,7 @@ The "sticky" bit, group of a file, `g+rwx` (octal `0070`), and `o+rwx` (octal `0
 
 Newly created files and directories are given an owner numerically equal to the `pts` identity of the user who created the file or directory. Initial mode bits are assigned by the AFS cilent, typically based on the creating user's `umask`.
 
-### <a name="2.22 What are &quot;dropboxes&quot;?"></a> 2.22 What are "dropboxes"?
+### 2.22 What are "dropboxes"?
 
 When the ACL on a directory is set to `irl` (_read_, _list_, _insert_), this creates what is called a "dropbox". In theory, users should be able to deposit files in the directory, but not modify them once deposited.
 
@@ -416,8 +386,8 @@ In practice, the "not modify them once deposited" part is not enforced by the fi
 
 Also, note that a `system:anyuser irl` ACL has an additional problems: because dropbox semantics are based on `pts` identities (see question 2.21), the fileserver cannot distinguish between two unauthenticated users. So, not only can a user come back days later and modify the "dropped" file, but **any** user can modify a file dropped by an unauthenticated user, at any time. 
 
-### <a name="2.23 Can I access a RW-Volume"></a>2.23 Can I access a RW volume using the RO path?
+### 2.23 Can I access a RW volume using the RO path?
 
 Depends. Once you have RO-Volumes released, a mountpoint pointing to the RO will bring you to the RO volume. To change that behavior, you have to change the corresponding mountpoint with `fs rmmount` and `fs mkmount -rw`. However, for some situations, like software installations, it might be useful to reach the RW volume through the RO path.
 
-You can do that for a single client with a special setup. The trick is to break the convention described in 2.17 for a single client: mount the RW volume `root.cell` (instead of `root.cell.readonly`) as `/afs/cellname`. This can be done by creating an alternative `root.afsrw` volume which is identical to `root.afs` except that it has an RW mount for `root.cell`, then add `-rootvol root.afsrw` to the `afsd` command options on startup (either in `/etc/init.d/afs` or wherever your system stores service configuation; this is often `/usr/vice/etc/config/afsd.options` on most Unixes and `/etc/sysconfig/afs` on many Linux distributions) and ensure that the `-dynroot` option is *not* specified.
\ No newline at end of file
+You can do that for a single client with a special setup. The trick is to break the convention described in 2.17 for a single client: mount the RW volume `root.cell` (instead of `root.cell.readonly`) as `/afs/cellname`. This can be done by creating an alternative `root.afsrw` volume which is identical to `root.afs` except that it has an RW mount for `root.cell`, then add `-rootvol root.afsrw` to the `afsd` command options on startup (either in `/etc/init.d/afs` or wherever your system stores service configuation; this is often `/usr/vice/etc/config/afsd.options` on most Unixes and `/etc/sysconfig/afs` on many Linux distributions) and ensure that the `-dynroot` option is *not* specified.