Reformat chapter one of the OpenAFS Administration Guide
authorRuss Allbery <rra@stanford.edu>
Thu, 27 May 2010 14:57:42 +0000 (09:57 -0500)
committerDerrick Brashear <shadow@dementia.org>
Fri, 28 May 2010 02:55:23 +0000 (19:55 -0700)
Purely reformatting to make the document more maintainable.  There are
no content changes.

Change-Id: Ic3fb32ef68c14418b3ac6bab92fda759db89b394
Reviewed-on: http://gerrit.openafs.org/2044
Reviewed-by: Derrick Brashear <shadow@dementia.org>
Tested-by: Derrick Brashear <shadow@dementia.org>

doc/xml/AdminGuide/auagd006.xml

index 138799f..443e542 100644 (file)
 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
+
 <chapter id="HDRWQ5">
   <title>An Overview of OpenAFS Administration</title>
 
-  <para>This chapter provides a broad overview of the concepts and organization of AFS. It is strongly recommended that anyone
-  involved in administering an AFS cell read this chapter before beginning to issue commands.</para>
+  <para>This chapter provides a broad overview of the concepts and
+  organization of AFS. It is strongly recommended that anyone involved in
+  administering an AFS cell read this chapter before beginning to issue
+  commands.</para>
 
   <sect1 id="HDRWQ6">
     <title>A Broad Overview of AFS</title>
 
-    <para>This section introduces most of the key terms and concepts necessary for a basic understanding of AFS. For a more detailed
-    discussion, see <link linkend="HDRWQ7">More Detailed Discussions of Some Basic Concepts</link>.</para>
+    <para>This section introduces most of the key terms and concepts
+    necessary for a basic understanding of AFS. For a more detailed
+    discussion, see <link linkend="HDRWQ7">More Detailed Discussions of
+    Some Basic Concepts</link>.</para>
 
     <sect2 renderas="sect3">
       <title>AFS: A Distributed File System</title>
 
-      <para>AFS is a distributed file system that enables users to share and access all of the files stored in a network of
-      computers as easily as they access the files stored on their local machines. The file system is called distributed for this
-      exact reason: files can reside on many different machines (be distributed across them), but are available to users on every
-      machine.</para>
+      <para>AFS is a distributed file system that enables users to share
+      and access all of the files stored in a network of computers as
+      easily as they access the files stored on their local machines. The
+      file system is called distributed for this exact reason: files can
+      reside on many different machines (be distributed across them), but
+      are available to users on every machine.</para>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 renderas="sect3">
       <title>Servers and Clients</title>
 
-      <para>In fact, AFS stores files on a subset of the machines in a network, called file server machines. File server machines
-      provide file storage and delivery service, along with other specialized services, to the other subset of machines in the
-      network, the client machines. These machines are called clients because they make use of the servers' services while doing
-      their own work. In a standard AFS configuration, clients provide computational power, access to the files in AFS and other
-      "general purpose" tools to the users seated at their consoles. There are generally many more client workstations than file
-      server machines.</para>
-
-      <para>AFS file server machines run a number of server processes, so called because each provides a distinct specialized
-      service: one handles file requests, another tracks file location, a third manages security, and so on. To avoid confusion, AFS
-      documentation always refers to server machines and server processes, not simply to servers. For a more detailed description of
-      the server processes, see <link linkend="HDRWQ17">AFS Server Processes and the Cache Manager</link>.</para>
+      <para>In fact, AFS stores files on a subset of the machines in a
+      network, called file server machines. File server machines provide
+      file storage and delivery service, along with other specialized
+      services, to the other subset of machines in the network, the client
+      machines. These machines are called clients because they make use of
+      the servers' services while doing their own work. In a standard AFS
+      configuration, clients provide computational power, access to the
+      files in AFS and other "general purpose" tools to the users seated
+      at their consoles. There are generally many more client workstations
+      than file server machines.</para>
+
+      <para>AFS file server machines run a number of server processes, so
+      called because each provides a distinct specialized service: one
+      handles file requests, another tracks file location, a third manages
+      security, and so on. To avoid confusion, AFS documentation always
+      refers to server machines and server processes, not simply to
+      servers. For a more detailed description of the server processes,
+      see <link linkend="HDRWQ17">AFS Server Processes and the Cache
+      Manager</link>.</para>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 renderas="sect3">
       <title>Cells</title>
 
-      <para>A cell is an administratively independent site running AFS. As a cell's system administrator, you make many decisions
-      about configuring and maintaining your cell in the way that best serves its users, without having to consult the
-      administrators in other cells. For example, you determine how many clients and servers to have, where to put files, and how to
-      allocate client machines to users.</para>
+      <para>A cell is an administratively independent site running AFS. As
+      a cell's system administrator, you make many decisions about
+      configuring and maintaining your cell in the way that best serves
+      its users, without having to consult the administrators in other
+      cells. For example, you determine how many clients and servers to
+      have, where to put files, and how to allocate client machines to
+      users.</para>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 renderas="sect3">
       <title>Transparent Access and the Uniform Namespace</title>
 
-      <para>Although your AFS cell is administratively independent, you probably want to organize the local collection of files
-      (your filespace or tree) so that users from other cells can also access the information in it. AFS enables cells to combine
-      their local filespaces into a global filespace, and does so in such a way that file access is transparent--users do not need
-      to know anything about a file's location in order to access it. All they need to know is the pathname of the file, which looks
-      the same in every cell. Thus every user at every machine sees the collection of files in the same way, meaning that AFS
-      provides a uniform namespace to its users.</para>
+      <para>Although your AFS cell is administratively independent, you
+      probably want to organize the local collection of files (your
+      filespace or tree) so that users from other cells can also access
+      the information in it. AFS enables cells to combine their local
+      filespaces into a global filespace, and does so in such a way that
+      file access is transparent--users do not need to know anything about
+      a file's location in order to access it. All they need to know is
+      the pathname of the file, which looks the same in every cell. Thus
+      every user at every machine sees the collection of files in the same
+      way, meaning that AFS provides a uniform namespace to its
+      users.</para>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 renderas="sect3">
       <title>Volumes</title>
 
-      <para>AFS groups files into volumes, making it possible to distribute files across many machines and yet maintain a uniform
-      namespace. A volume is a unit of disk space that functions like a container for a set of related files, keeping them all
-      together on one partition. Volumes can vary in size, but are (by definition) smaller than a partition.</para>
-
-      <para>Volumes are important to system administrators and users for several reasons. Their small size makes them easy to move
-      from one partition to another, or even between machines. The system administrator can maintain maximum efficiency by moving
-      volumes to keep the load balanced evenly. In addition, volumes correspond to directories in the filespace--most cells store
-      the contents of each user home directory in a separate volume. Thus the complete contents of the directory move together when
-      the volume moves, making it easy for AFS to keep track of where a file is at a certain time. Volume moves are recorded
-      automatically, so users do not have to keep track of file locations.</para>
+      <para>AFS groups files into volumes, making it possible to
+      distribute files across many machines and yet maintain a uniform
+      namespace. A volume is a unit of disk space that functions like a
+      container for a set of related files, keeping them all together on
+      one partition. Volumes can vary in size, but are (by definition)
+      smaller than a partition.</para>
+
+      <para>Volumes are important to system administrators and users for
+      several reasons. Their small size makes them easy to move from one
+      partition to another, or even between machines. The system
+      administrator can maintain maximum efficiency by moving volumes to
+      keep the load balanced evenly. In addition, volumes correspond to
+      directories in the filespace--most cells store the contents of each
+      user home directory in a separate volume. Thus the complete contents
+      of the directory move together when the volume moves, making it easy
+      for AFS to keep track of where a file is at a certain time. Volume
+      moves are recorded automatically, so users do not have to keep track
+      of file locations.</para>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 renderas="sect3">
       <title>Efficiency Boosters: Replication and Caching</title>
 
-      <para>AFS incorporates special features on server machines and client machines that help make it efficient and
-      reliable.</para>
-
-      <para>On server machines, AFS enables administrators to replicate commonly-used volumes, such as those containing binaries for
-      popular programs. Replication means putting an identical read-only copy (sometimes called a clone) of a volume on more than
-      one file server machine. The failure of one file server machine housing the volume does not interrupt users' work, because the
-      volume's contents are still available from other machines. Replication also means that one machine does not become
-      overburdened with requests for files from a popular volume.</para>
-
-      <para>On client machines, AFS uses caching to improve efficiency. When a user on a client workstation requests a file, the
-      Cache Manager on the client sends a request for the data to the File Server process running on the proper file server machine.
-      The user does not need to know which machine this is; the Cache Manager determines file location automatically. The Cache
-      Manager receives the file from the File Server process and puts it into the cache, an area of the client machine's local disk
-      or memory dedicated to temporary file storage. Caching improves efficiency because the client does not need to send a request
-      across the network every time the user wants the same file. Network traffic is minimized, and subsequent access to the file is
-      especially fast because the file is stored locally. AFS has a way of ensuring that the cached file stays up-to-date, called a
-      callback.</para>
+      <para>AFS incorporates special features on server machines and
+      client machines that help make it efficient and reliable.</para>
+
+      <para>On server machines, AFS enables administrators to replicate
+      commonly-used volumes, such as those containing binaries for popular
+      programs. Replication means putting an identical read-only copy
+      (sometimes called a clone) of a volume on more than one file server
+      machine. The failure of one file server machine housing the volume
+      does not interrupt users' work, because the volume's contents are
+      still available from other machines. Replication also means that one
+      machine does not become overburdened with requests for files from a
+      popular volume.</para>
+
+      <para>On client machines, AFS uses caching to improve
+      efficiency. When a user on a client workstation requests a file, the
+      Cache Manager on the client sends a request for the data to the File
+      Server process running on the proper file server machine.  The user
+      does not need to know which machine this is; the Cache Manager
+      determines file location automatically. The Cache Manager receives
+      the file from the File Server process and puts it into the cache, an
+      area of the client machine's local disk or memory dedicated to
+      temporary file storage. Caching improves efficiency because the
+      client does not need to send a request across the network every time
+      the user wants the same file. Network traffic is minimized, and
+      subsequent access to the file is especially fast because the file is
+      stored locally. AFS has a way of ensuring that the cached file stays
+      up-to-date, called a callback.</para>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 renderas="sect3">
-      <title>Security: Mutual Authentication and Access Control Lists</title>
-
-      <para>Even in a cell where file sharing is especially frequent and widespread, it is not desirable that every user have equal
-      access to every file. One way AFS provides adequate security is by requiring that servers and clients prove their identities
-      to one another before they exchange information. This procedure, called mutual authentication, requires that both server and
-      client demonstrate knowledge of a "shared secret" (like a password) known only to the two of them. Mutual authentication
-      guarantees that servers provide information only to authorized clients and that clients receive information only from
-      legitimate servers.</para>
-
-      <para>Users themselves control another aspect of AFS security, by determining who has access to the directories they own. For
-      any directory a user owns, he or she can build an access control list (ACL) that grants or denies access to the contents of
-      the directory. An access control list pairs specific users with specific types of access privileges. There are seven separate
-      permissions and up to twenty different people or groups of people can appear on an access control list.</para>
-
-      <para>For a more detailed description of AFS's mutual authentication procedure, see <link linkend="HDRWQ75">A More Detailed
-      Look at Mutual Authentication</link>. For further discussion of ACLs, see <link linkend="HDRWQ562">Managing Access Control
+      <title>Security: Mutual Authentication and Access Control
+      Lists</title>
+
+      <para>Even in a cell where file sharing is especially frequent and
+      widespread, it is not desirable that every user have equal access to
+      every file. One way AFS provides adequate security is by requiring
+      that servers and clients prove their identities to one another
+      before they exchange information. This procedure, called mutual
+      authentication, requires that both server and client demonstrate
+      knowledge of a "shared secret" (like a password) known only to the
+      two of them. Mutual authentication guarantees that servers provide
+      information only to authorized clients and that clients receive
+      information only from legitimate servers.</para>
+
+      <para>Users themselves control another aspect of AFS security, by
+      determining who has access to the directories they own. For any
+      directory a user owns, he or she can build an access control list
+      (ACL) that grants or denies access to the contents of the
+      directory. An access control list pairs specific users with specific
+      types of access privileges. There are seven separate permissions and
+      up to twenty different people or groups of people can appear on an
+      access control list.</para>
+
+      <para>For a more detailed description of AFS's mutual authentication
+      procedure, see <link linkend="HDRWQ75">A More Detailed Look at
+      Mutual Authentication</link>. For further discussion of ACLs, see
+      <link linkend="HDRWQ562">Managing Access Control
       Lists</link>.</para>
     </sect2>
   </sect1>
   <sect1 id="HDRWQ7">
     <title>More Detailed Discussions of Some Basic Concepts</title>
 
-    <para>The previous section offered a brief overview of the many concepts that an AFS system administrator needs to understand.
-    The following sections examine some important concepts in more detail. Although not all concepts are new to an experienced
-    administrator, reading this section helps ensure a common understanding of term and concepts.</para>
+    <para>The previous section offered a brief overview of the many
+    concepts that an AFS system administrator needs to understand.  The
+    following sections examine some important concepts in more
+    detail. Although not all concepts are new to an experienced
+    administrator, reading this section helps ensure a common
+    understanding of term and concepts.</para>
 
     <sect2 id="HDRWQ8">
       <title>Networks</title>
         <secondary>defined</secondary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>A <emphasis>network</emphasis> is a collection of interconnected computers able to communicate with each other and
+      <para>A <emphasis>network</emphasis> is a collection of
+      interconnected computers able to communicate with each other and
       transfer information back and forth.</para>
 
-      <para>A networked computing environment contrasts with two types of computing environments: <emphasis>mainframe</emphasis> and
-      <emphasis>personal</emphasis>. <indexterm>
-          <primary>network</primary>
+      <para>A networked computing environment contrasts with two types of
+      computing environments: <emphasis>mainframe</emphasis> and
+      <emphasis>personal</emphasis>.
+      <indexterm>
+        <primary>network</primary>
 
-          <secondary>as computing environment</secondary>
-        </indexterm> <indexterm>
-          <primary>environment</primary>
+        <secondary>as computing environment</secondary>
+      </indexterm>
+      <indexterm>
+        <primary>environment</primary>
 
-          <secondary>types compared</secondary>
-        </indexterm> <itemizedlist>
+        <secondary>types compared</secondary>
+      </indexterm>
+        <itemizedlist>
           <listitem>
-            <para>A <emphasis>mainframe</emphasis> computing environment is the most traditional. It uses a single powerful computer
-            (the mainframe) to do the majority of the work in the system, both file storage and computation. It serves many users,
-            who access their files and issue commands to the mainframe via terminals, which generally have only enough computing
-            power to accept input from a keyboard and to display data on the screen.</para>
+            <para>A <emphasis>mainframe</emphasis> computing environment
+            is the most traditional. It uses a single powerful computer
+            (the mainframe) to do the majority of the work in the system,
+            both file storage and computation. It serves many users, who
+            access their files and issue commands to the mainframe via
+            terminals, which generally have only enough computing power to
+            accept input from a keyboard and to display data on the
+            screen.</para>
 
             <indexterm>
               <primary>mainframe</primary>
           </listitem>
 
           <listitem>
-            <para>A <emphasis>personal</emphasis> computing environment is a single small computer that serves one (or, at the most,
-            a few) users. Like a mainframe computer, the single computer stores all the files and performs all computation. Like a
-            terminal, the personal computer provides access to the computer through a keyboard and screen.</para>
+            <para>A <emphasis>personal</emphasis> computing environment is
+            a single small computer that serves one (or, at the most, a
+            few) users. Like a mainframe computer, the single computer
+            stores all the files and performs all computation. Like a
+            terminal, the personal computer provides access to the
+            computer through a keyboard and screen.</para>
 
             <indexterm>
               <primary>personal</primary>
               <secondary>computing environment</secondary>
             </indexterm>
           </listitem>
-        </itemizedlist></para>
-
-      <para>A network can connect computers of any kind, but the typical network running AFS connects high-function personal
-      workstations. Each workstation has some computing power and local disk space, usually more than a personal computer or
-      terminal, but less than a mainframe. For more about the classes of machines used in an AFS environment, see <link
-      linkend="HDRWQ10">Servers and Clients</link>.</para>
+      </itemizedlist>
+      </para>
+
+      <para>A network can connect computers of any kind, but the typical
+      network running AFS connects high-function personal
+      workstations. Each workstation has some computing power and local
+      disk space, usually more than a personal computer or terminal, but
+      less than a mainframe. For more about the classes of machines used
+      in an AFS environment, see <link linkend="HDRWQ10">Servers and
+      Clients</link>.</para>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 id="HDRWQ9">
         <primary>distributed file system</primary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>A <emphasis>file system</emphasis> is a collection of files and the facilities (programs and commands) that enable users
-      to access the information in the files. All computing environments have file systems. In a mainframe environment, the file
-      system consists of all the files on the mainframe's storage disks, whereas in a personal computing environment it consists of
-      the files on the computer's local disk.</para>
-
-      <para>Networked computing environments often use <emphasis>distributed file systems</emphasis> like AFS. A distributed file
-      system takes advantage of the interconnected nature of the network by storing files on more than one computer in the network
-      and making them accessible to all of them. In other words, the responsibility for file storage and delivery is "distributed"
-      among multiple machines instead of relying on only one. Despite the distribution of responsibility, a distributed file system
-      like AFS creates the illusion that there is a single filespace.</para>
+      <para>A <emphasis>file system</emphasis> is a collection of files
+      and the facilities (programs and commands) that enable users to
+      access the information in the files. All computing environments have
+      file systems. In a mainframe environment, the file system consists
+      of all the files on the mainframe's storage disks, whereas in a
+      personal computing environment it consists of the files on the
+      computer's local disk.</para>
+
+      <para>Networked computing environments often use
+      <emphasis>distributed file systems</emphasis> like AFS. A
+      distributed file system takes advantage of the interconnected nature
+      of the network by storing files on more than one computer in the
+      network and making them accessible to all of them. In other words,
+      the responsibility for file storage and delivery is "distributed"
+      among multiple machines instead of relying on only one. Despite the
+      distribution of responsibility, a distributed file system like AFS
+      creates the illusion that there is a single filespace.</para>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 id="HDRWQ10">
         <secondary>definition</secondary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>AFS uses a server/client model. In general, a server is a machine, or a process running on a machine, that provides
-      specialized services to other machines. A client is a machine or process that makes use of a server's specialized service
-      during the course of its own work, which is often of a more general nature than the server's. The functional distinction
-      between clients and server is not always strict, however--a server can be considered the client of another server whose
-      service it is using.</para>
+      <para>AFS uses a server/client model. In general, a server is a
+      machine, or a process running on a machine, that provides
+      specialized services to other machines. A client is a machine or
+      process that makes use of a server's specialized service during the
+      course of its own work, which is often of a more general nature than
+      the server's. The functional distinction between clients and server
+      is not always strict, however--a server can be considered the client
+      of another server whose service it is using.</para>
 
-      <para>AFS divides the machines on a network into two basic classes, <emphasis>file server machines</emphasis> and
-      <emphasis>client machines</emphasis>, and assigns different tasks and responsibilities to each.</para>
+      <para>AFS divides the machines on a network into two basic classes,
+      <emphasis>file server machines</emphasis> and <emphasis>client
+      machines</emphasis>, and assigns different tasks and
+      responsibilities to each.</para>
 
       <formalpara>
         <title>File Server Machines</title>
           <tertiary>definition</tertiary>
         </indexterm>
 
-        <para><emphasis>File server machines</emphasis> store the files in the distributed file system, and a <emphasis>server
-        process</emphasis> running on the file server machine delivers and receives files. AFS file server machines run a number of
-        <emphasis>server processes</emphasis>. Each process has a special function, such as maintaining databases important to AFS
-        administration, managing security or handling volumes. This modular design enables each server process to specialize in one
-        area, and thus perform more efficiently. For a description of the function of each AFS server process, see <link
-        linkend="HDRWQ17">AFS Server Processes and the Cache Manager</link>.</para>
+        <para><emphasis>File server machines</emphasis> store the files in
+        the distributed file system, and a <emphasis>server
+        process</emphasis> running on the file server machine delivers and
+        receives files. AFS file server machines run a number of
+        <emphasis>server processes</emphasis>. Each process has a special
+        function, such as maintaining databases important to AFS
+        administration, managing security or handling volumes. This
+        modular design enables each server process to specialize in one
+        area, and thus perform more efficiently. For a description of the
+        function of each AFS server process, see <link
+        linkend="HDRWQ17">AFS Server Processes and the Cache
+        Manager</link>.</para>
       </formalpara>
 
-      <para>Not all AFS server machines must run all of the server processes. Some processes run on only a few machines because the
-      demand for their services is low. Other processes run on only one machine in order to act as a synchronization site. See <link
-      linkend="HDRWQ90">The Four Roles for File Server Machines</link>.</para>
+      <para>Not all AFS server machines must run all of the server
+      processes. Some processes run on only a few machines because the
+      demand for their services is low. Other processes run on only one
+      machine in order to act as a synchronization site. See <link
+      linkend="HDRWQ90">The Four Roles for File Server
+      Machines</link>.</para>
 
       <formalpara>
         <title>Client Machines</title>
           <tertiary>definition</tertiary>
         </indexterm>
 
-        <para>The other class of machines are the <emphasis>client machines</emphasis>, which generally work directly for users,
-        providing computational power and other general purpose tools. Clients also provide users with access to the files stored on
-        the file server machines. Clients do not run any special processes per se, but do use a modified kernel that enables them to
-        communicate with the AFS server processes running on the file server machines and to cache files. This collection of kernel
-        modifications is referred to as the Cache Manager; see <link linkend="HDRWQ28">The Cache Manager</link>. There are usually
-        many more client machines in a cell than file server machines.</para>
+        <para>The other class of machines are the <emphasis>client
+        machines</emphasis>, which generally work directly for users,
+        providing computational power and other general purpose
+        tools. Clients also provide users with access to the files stored
+        on the file server machines. Clients do not run any special
+        processes per se, but do use a modified kernel that enables them
+        to communicate with the AFS server processes running on the file
+        server machines and to cache files. This collection of kernel
+        modifications is referred to as the Cache Manager; see <link
+        linkend="HDRWQ28">The Cache Manager</link>. There are usually many
+        more client machines in a cell than file server machines.</para>
       </formalpara>
 
       <formalpara>
           <tertiary>as typical AFS machine</tertiary>
         </indexterm>
 
-        <para>In the most typical AFS configuration, both file server machines and client machines are high-function workstations
-        with disk drives. While this configuration is not required, it does have some advantages.</para>
+        <para>In the most typical AFS configuration, both file server
+        machines and client machines are high-function workstations with
+        disk drives. While this configuration is not required, it does
+        have some advantages.</para>
       </formalpara>
 
-      <para>There are several advantages to using personal workstations as file server machines. One is that it is easy to expand
-      the network by adding another file server machine. It is also easy to increase storage space by adding disks to existing
-      machines. Using workstations rather than more powerful mainframes makes it more economical to use multiple file server
-      machines rather than one. Multiple file server machines provide an increase in system availability and reliability if popular
-      files are available on more than one machine.</para>
-
-      <para>The advantage of using workstations as clients is that caching on the local disk speeds the delivery of files to
-      application programs. (For an explanation of caching, see <link linkend="HDRWQ16">Caching and Callbacks</link>.) Diskless
-      machines can access AFS if they are running NFS(R) and the NFS/AFS Translator, an optional component of the AFS
-      distribution.</para>
+      <para>There are several advantages to using personal workstations as
+      file server machines. One is that it is easy to expand the network
+      by adding another file server machine. It is also easy to increase
+      storage space by adding disks to existing machines. Using
+      workstations rather than more powerful mainframes makes it more
+      economical to use multiple file server machines rather than
+      one. Multiple file server machines provide an increase in system
+      availability and reliability if popular files are available on more
+      than one machine.</para>
+
+      <para>The advantage of using workstations as clients is that caching
+      on the local disk speeds the delivery of files to application
+      programs. (For an explanation of caching, see <link
+      linkend="HDRWQ16">Caching and Callbacks</link>.) Diskless machines
+      can access AFS if they are running NFS(R) and the NFS/AFS
+      Translator, an optional component of the AFS distribution.</para>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 id="HDRWQ11">
         <primary>cell</primary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>A <emphasis>cell</emphasis> is an independently administered site running AFS. In terms of hardware, it consists of a
-      collection of file server machines and client machines defined as belonging to the cell; a machine can only belong to one cell
-      at a time. Users also belong to a cell in the sense of having an account in it, but unlike machines can belong to (have an
-      account in) multiple cells. To say that a cell is administratively independent means that its administrators determine many
-      details of its configuration without having to consult administrators in other cells or a central authority. For example, a
-      cell administrator determines how many machines of different types to run, where to put files in the local tree, how to
-      associate volumes and directories, and how much space to allocate to each user.</para>
-
-      <para>The terms <emphasis>local cell</emphasis> and <emphasis>home cell</emphasis> are equivalent, and refer to the cell in
-      which a user has initially authenticated during a session, by logging onto a machine that belongs to that cell. All other
-      cells are referred to as <emphasis>foreign</emphasis> from the user's perspective. In other words, throughout a login session,
-      a user is accessing the filespace through a single Cache Manager--the one on the machine to which he or she initially logged
-      in--whose cell membership defines the local cell. All other cells are considered foreign during that login session, even if
-      the user authenticates in additional cells or uses the <emphasis role="bold">cd</emphasis> command to change directories into
-      their file trees.</para>
+      <para>A <emphasis>cell</emphasis> is an independently administered
+      site running AFS. In terms of hardware, it consists of a collection
+      of file server machines and client machines defined as belonging to
+      the cell; a machine can only belong to one cell at a time. Users
+      also belong to a cell in the sense of having an account in it, but
+      unlike machines can belong to (have an account in) multiple
+      cells. To say that a cell is administratively independent means that
+      its administrators determine many details of its configuration
+      without having to consult administrators in other cells or a central
+      authority. For example, a cell administrator determines how many
+      machines of different types to run, where to put files in the local
+      tree, how to associate volumes and directories, and how much space
+      to allocate to each user.</para>
+
+      <para>The terms <emphasis>local cell</emphasis> and <emphasis>home
+      cell</emphasis> are equivalent, and refer to the cell in which a
+      user has initially authenticated during a session, by logging onto a
+      machine that belongs to that cell. All other cells are referred to
+      as <emphasis>foreign</emphasis> from the user's perspective. In
+      other words, throughout a login session, a user is accessing the
+      filespace through a single Cache Manager--the one on the machine to
+      which he or she initially logged in--whose cell membership defines
+      the local cell. All other cells are considered foreign during that
+      login session, even if the user authenticates in additional cells or
+      uses the <emphasis role="bold">cd</emphasis> command to change
+      directories into their file trees.</para>
 
       <indexterm>
         <primary>local cell</primary>
         <secondary>foreign</secondary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>It is possible to maintain more than one cell at a single geographical location. For instance, separate departments on a
-      university campus or in a corporation can choose to administer their own cells. It is also possible to have machines at
-      geographically distant sites belong to the same cell; only limits on the speed of network communication determine how
-      practical this is.</para>
-
-      <para>Despite their independence, AFS cells generally agree to make their local filespace visible to other AFS cells, so that
-      users in different cells can share files if they choose. If your cell is to participate in the "global" AFS namespace, it must
-      comply with a few basic conventions governing how the local filespace is configured and how the addresses of certain file
-      server machines are advertised to the outside world.</para>
+      <para>It is possible to maintain more than one cell at a single
+      geographical location. For instance, separate departments on a
+      university campus or in a corporation can choose to administer their
+      own cells. It is also possible to have machines at geographically
+      distant sites belong to the same cell; only limits on the speed of
+      network communication determine how practical this is.</para>
+
+      <para>Despite their independence, AFS cells generally agree to make
+      their local filespace visible to other AFS cells, so that users in
+      different cells can share files if they choose. If your cell is to
+      participate in the "global" AFS namespace, it must comply with a few
+      basic conventions governing how the local filespace is configured
+      and how the addresses of certain file server machines are advertised
+      to the outside world.</para>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 id="HDRWQ12">
         <secondary>transparent (AFS feature)</secondary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>One of the features that makes AFS easy to use is that it provides transparent access to the files in a cell's
-      filespace. Users do not have to know which file server machine stores a file in order to access it; they simply provide the
-      file's pathname, which AFS automatically translates into a machine location.</para>
-
-      <para>In addition to transparent access, AFS also creates a <emphasis>uniform namespace</emphasis>--a file's pathname is
-      identical regardless of which client machine the user is working on. The cell's file tree looks the same when viewed from any
-      client because the cell's file server machines store all the files centrally and present them in an identical manner to all
+      <para>One of the features that makes AFS easy to use is that it
+      provides transparent access to the files in a cell's
+      filespace. Users do not have to know which file server machine
+      stores a file in order to access it; they simply provide the file's
+      pathname, which AFS automatically translates into a machine
+      location.</para>
+
+      <para>In addition to transparent access, AFS also creates a
+      <emphasis>uniform namespace</emphasis>--a file's pathname is
+      identical regardless of which client machine the user is working
+      on. The cell's file tree looks the same when viewed from any client
+      because the cell's file server machines store all the files
+      centrally and present them in an identical manner to all
       clients.</para>
 
-      <para>To enable the transparent access and the uniform namespace features, the system administrator must follow a few simple
-      conventions in configuring client machines and file trees. For details, see <link linkend="HDRWQ39">Making Other Cells Visible
-      in Your Cell</link>.</para>
+      <para>To enable the transparent access and the uniform namespace
+      features, the system administrator must follow a few simple
+      conventions in configuring client machines and file trees. For
+      details, see <link linkend="HDRWQ39">Making Other Cells Visible in
+      Your Cell</link>.</para>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 id="HDRWQ13">
         <secondary>definition</secondary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>A <emphasis>volume</emphasis> is a conceptual container for a set of related files that keeps them all together on one
-      file server machine partition. Volumes can vary in size, but are (by definition) smaller than a partition. Volumes are the
-      main administrative unit in AFS, and have several characteristics that make administrative tasks easier and help improve
-      overall system performance. <itemizedlist>
+      <para>A <emphasis>volume</emphasis> is a conceptual container for a
+      set of related files that keeps them all together on one file server
+      machine partition. Volumes can vary in size, but are (by definition)
+      smaller than a partition. Volumes are the main administrative unit
+      in AFS, and have several characteristics that make administrative
+      tasks easier and help improve overall system
+      performance. <itemizedlist>
           <listitem>
-            <para>The relatively small size of volumes makes them easy to move from one partition to another, or even between
+            <para>The relatively small size of volumes makes them easy to
+            move from one partition to another, or even between
             machines.</para>
           </listitem>
 
           <listitem>
-            <para>You can maintain maximum system efficiency by moving volumes to keep the load balanced evenly among the different
-            machines. If a partition becomes full, the small size of individual volumes makes it easy to find enough room on other
+            <para>You can maintain maximum system efficiency by moving
+            volumes to keep the load balanced evenly among the different
+            machines. If a partition becomes full, the small size of
+            individual volumes makes it easy to find enough room on other
             machines for them.</para>
 
             <indexterm>
           </listitem>
 
           <listitem>
-            <para>Each volume corresponds logically to a directory in the file tree and keeps together, on a single partition, all
-            the data that makes up the files in the directory. By maintaining (for example) a separate volume for each user's home
-            directory, you keep all of the user's files together, but separate from those of other users. This is an administrative
-            convenience that is impossible if the partition is the smallest unit of storage.</para>
+            <para>Each volume corresponds logically to a directory in the
+            file tree and keeps together, on a single partition, all the
+            data that makes up the files in the directory. By maintaining
+            (for example) a separate volume for each user's home
+            directory, you keep all of the user's files together, but
+            separate from those of other users. This is an administrative
+            convenience that is impossible if the partition is the
+            smallest unit of storage.</para>
 
             <indexterm>
               <primary>volume</primary>
           </listitem>
 
           <listitem>
-            <para>The directory/volume correspondence also makes transparent file access possible, because it simplifies the process
-            of file location. All files in a directory reside together in one volume and in order to find a file, a file server
-            process need only know the name of the file's parent directory, information which is included in the file's pathname.
-            AFS knows how to translate the directory name into a volume name, and automatically tracks every volume's location, even
-            when a volume is moved from machine to machine. For more about the directory/volume correspondence, see <link
-            linkend="HDRWQ14">Mount Points</link>.</para>
+            <para>The directory/volume correspondence also makes
+            transparent file access possible, because it simplifies the
+            process of file location. All files in a directory reside
+            together in one volume and in order to find a file, a file
+            server process need only know the name of the file's parent
+            directory, information which is included in the file's
+            pathname.  AFS knows how to translate the directory name into
+            a volume name, and automatically tracks every volume's
+            location, even when a volume is moved from machine to
+            machine. For more about the directory/volume correspondence,
+            see <link linkend="HDRWQ14">Mount Points</link>.</para>
           </listitem>
 
           <listitem>
-            <para>Volumes increase file availability through replication and backup.</para>
+            <para>Volumes increase file availability through replication
+            and backup.</para>
 
             <indexterm>
               <primary>volume</primary>
           </listitem>
 
           <listitem>
-            <para>Replication (placing copies of a volume on more than one file server machine) makes the contents more reliably
-            available; for details, see <link linkend="HDRWQ15">Replication</link>. Entire sets of volumes can be backed up to tape
-            and restored to the file system; see <link linkend="HDRWQ248">Configuring the AFS Backup System</link> and <link
-            linkend="HDRWQ283">Backing Up and Restoring AFS Data</link>. In AFS, backup also refers to recording the state of a
-            volume at a certain time and then storing it (either on tape or elsewhere in the file system) for recovery in the event
-            files in it are accidentally deleted or changed. See <link linkend="HDRWQ201">Creating Backup Volumes</link>.</para>
+            <para>Replication (placing copies of a volume on more than one
+            file server machine) makes the contents more reliably
+            available; for details, see <link
+            linkend="HDRWQ15">Replication</link>. Entire sets of volumes
+            can be backed up to tape and restored to the file system; see
+            <link linkend="HDRWQ248">Configuring the AFS Backup
+            System</link> and <link linkend="HDRWQ283">Backing Up and
+            Restoring AFS Data</link>. In AFS, backup also refers to
+            recording the state of a volume at a certain time and then
+            storing it (either on tape or elsewhere in the file system)
+            for recovery in the event files in it are accidentally deleted
+            or changed. See <link linkend="HDRWQ201">Creating Backup
+            Volumes</link>.</para>
           </listitem>
 
           <listitem>
-            <para>Volumes are the unit of resource management. A space quota associated with each volume sets a limit on the maximum
-            volume size. See <link linkend="HDRWQ234">Setting and Displaying Volume Quota and Current Size</link>.</para>
+            <para>Volumes are the unit of resource management. A space
+            quota associated with each volume sets a limit on the maximum
+            volume size. See <link linkend="HDRWQ234">Setting and
+            Displaying Volume Quota and Current Size</link>.</para>
 
             <indexterm>
               <primary>volume</primary>
               <tertiary>resource management</tertiary>
             </indexterm>
           </listitem>
-        </itemizedlist></para>
+        </itemizedlist>
+      </para>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 id="HDRWQ14">
         <secondary>definition</secondary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>The previous section discussed how each volume corresponds logically to a directory in the file system: the volume keeps
-      together on one partition all the data in the files residing in the directory. The directory that corresponds to a volume is
-      called its <emphasis>root directory</emphasis>, and the mechanism that associates the directory and volume is called a
-      <emphasis>mount point</emphasis>. A mount point is similar to a symbolic link in the file tree that specifies which volume
-      contains the files kept in a directory. A mount point is not an actual symbolic link; its internal structure is
-      different.</para>
+      <para>The previous section discussed how each volume corresponds
+      logically to a directory in the file system: the volume keeps
+      together on one partition all the data in the files residing in the
+      directory. The directory that corresponds to a volume is called its
+      <emphasis>root directory</emphasis>, and the mechanism that
+      associates the directory and volume is called a <emphasis>mount
+      point</emphasis>. A mount point is similar to a symbolic link in the
+      file tree that specifies which volume contains the files kept in a
+      directory. A mount point is not an actual symbolic link; its
+      internal structure is different.</para>
 
       <note>
-        <para>You must not create a symbolic link to a file whose name begins with the number sign (#) or the percent sign (%),
-        because the Cache Manager interprets such a link as a mount point to a regular or read/write volume, respectively.</para>
+        <para>You must not create a symbolic link to a file whose name
+        begins with the number sign (#) or the percent sign (%), because
+        the Cache Manager interprets such a link as a mount point to a
+        regular or read/write volume, respectively.</para>
       </note>
 
       <indexterm>
         <secondary>mounting</secondary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>The use of mount points means that many of the elements in an AFS file tree that look and function just like standard
-      UNIX file system directories are actually mount points. In form, a mount point is a one-line file that names the volume
-      containing the data for files in the directory. When the Cache Manager (see <link linkend="HDRWQ28">The Cache Manager</link>)
-      encounters a mount point--for example, in the course of interpreting a pathname--it looks in the volume named in the mount
-      point. In the volume the Cache Manager finds an actual UNIX-style directory element--the volume's root directory--that lists
-      the files contained in the directory/volume. The next element in the pathname appears in that list.</para>
-
-      <para>A volume is said to be <emphasis>mounted</emphasis> at the point in the file tree where there is a mount point pointing
-      to the volume. A volume's contents are not visible or accessible unless it is mounted.</para>
+      <para>The use of mount points means that many of the elements in an
+      AFS file tree that look and function just like standard UNIX file
+      system directories are actually mount points. In form, a mount point
+      is a one-line file that names the volume containing the data for
+      files in the directory. When the Cache Manager (see <link
+      linkend="HDRWQ28">The Cache Manager</link>) encounters a mount
+      point--for example, in the course of interpreting a pathname--it
+      looks in the volume named in the mount point. In the volume the
+      Cache Manager finds an actual UNIX-style directory element--the
+      volume's root directory--that lists the files contained in the
+      directory/volume. The next element in the pathname appears in that
+      list.</para>
+
+      <para>A volume is said to be <emphasis>mounted</emphasis> at the
+      point in the file tree where there is a mount point pointing to the
+      volume. A volume's contents are not visible or accessible unless it
+      is mounted.</para>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 id="HDRWQ15">
         <primary>clone</primary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para><emphasis>Replication</emphasis> refers to making a copy, or <emphasis>clone</emphasis>, of a source read/write volume
-      and then placing the copy on one or more additional file server machines in a cell. One benefit of replicating a volume is
-      that it increases the availability of the contents. If one file server machine housing the volume fails, users can still
-      access the volume on a different machine. No one machine need become overburdened with requests for a popular file, either,
-      because the file is available from several machines.</para>
-
-      <para>Replication is not necessarily appropriate for cells with limited disk space, nor are all types of volumes equally
-      suitable for replication (replication is most appropriate for volumes that contain popular files that do not change very
-      often). For more details, see <link linkend="HDRWQ50">When to Replicate Volumes</link>.</para>
+      <para><emphasis>Replication</emphasis> refers to making a copy, or
+      <emphasis>clone</emphasis>, of a source read/write volume and then
+      placing the copy on one or more additional file server machines in a
+      cell. One benefit of replicating a volume is that it increases the
+      availability of the contents. If one file server machine housing the
+      volume fails, users can still access the volume on a different
+      machine. No one machine need become overburdened with requests for a
+      popular file, either, because the file is available from several
+      machines.</para>
+
+      <para>Replication is not necessarily appropriate for cells with
+      limited disk space, nor are all types of volumes equally suitable
+      for replication (replication is most appropriate for volumes that
+      contain popular files that do not change very often). For more
+      details, see <link linkend="HDRWQ50">When to Replicate
+      Volumes</link>.</para>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 id="HDRWQ16">
         <primary>caching</primary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>Just as replication increases system availability, <emphasis>caching</emphasis> increases the speed and efficiency of
-      file access in AFS. Each AFS client machine dedicates a portion of its local disk or memory to a cache where it stores data
-      temporarily. Whenever an application program (such as a text editor) running on a client machine requests data from an AFS
-      file, the request passes through the Cache Manager. The Cache Manager is a portion of the client machine's kernel that
-      translates file requests from local application programs into cross-network requests to the <emphasis>File Server
-      process</emphasis> running on the file server machine storing the file. When the Cache Manager receives the requested data
-      from the File Server, it stores it in the cache and then passes it on to the application program.</para>
-
-      <para>Caching improves the speed of data delivery to application programs in the following ways:</para>
+      <para>Just as replication increases system availability,
+      <emphasis>caching</emphasis> increases the speed and efficiency of
+      file access in AFS. Each AFS client machine dedicates a portion of
+      its local disk or memory to a cache where it stores data
+      temporarily. Whenever an application program (such as a text editor)
+      running on a client machine requests data from an AFS file, the
+      request passes through the Cache Manager. The Cache Manager is a
+      portion of the client machine's kernel that translates file requests
+      from local application programs into cross-network requests to the
+      <emphasis>File Server process</emphasis> running on the file server
+      machine storing the file. When the Cache Manager receives the
+      requested data from the File Server, it stores it in the cache and
+      then passes it on to the application program.</para>
+
+      <para>Caching improves the speed of data delivery to application
+      programs in the following ways:</para>
 
       <itemizedlist>
         <listitem>
-          <para>When the application program repeatedly asks for data from the same file, it is already on the local disk. The
-          application does not have to wait for the Cache Manager to request and receive the data from the File Server.</para>
+          <para>When the application program repeatedly asks for data from
+          the same file, it is already on the local disk. The application
+          does not have to wait for the Cache Manager to request and
+          receive the data from the File Server.</para>
         </listitem>
 
         <listitem>
-          <para>Caching data eliminates the need for repeated request and transfer of the same data, so network traffic is reduced.
-          Thus, initial requests and other traffic can get through more quickly.</para>
+          <para>Caching data eliminates the need for repeated request and
+          transfer of the same data, so network traffic is reduced.  Thus,
+          initial requests and other traffic can get through more
+          quickly.</para>
 
           <indexterm>
             <primary>AFS</primary>
         <secondary>cached data</secondary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>While caching provides many advantages, it also creates the problem of maintaining consistency among the many cached
-      copies of a file and the source version of a file. This problem is solved using a mechanism referred to as a
-      <emphasis>callback</emphasis>.</para>
+      <para>While caching provides many advantages, it also creates the
+      problem of maintaining consistency among the many cached copies of a
+      file and the source version of a file. This problem is solved using
+      a mechanism referred to as a <emphasis>callback</emphasis>.</para>
 
-      <para>A callback is a promise by a File Server to a Cache Manager to inform the latter when a change is made to any of the
-      data delivered by the File Server. Callbacks are used differently based on the type of file delivered by the File Server:
-      <itemizedlist>
+      <para>A callback is a promise by a File Server to a Cache Manager to
+      inform the latter when a change is made to any of the data delivered
+      by the File Server. Callbacks are used differently based on the type
+      of file delivered by the File Server:  <itemizedlist>
           <listitem>
-            <para>When a File Server delivers a writable copy of a file (from a read/write volume) to the Cache Manager, the File
-            Server sends along a callback with that file. If the source version of the file is changed by another user, the File
-            Server breaks the callback associated with the cached version of that file--indicating to the Cache Manager that it
-            needs to update the cached copy.</para>
+            <para>When a File Server delivers a writable copy of a file
+            (from a read/write volume) to the Cache Manager, the File
+            Server sends along a callback with that file. If the source
+            version of the file is changed by another user, the File
+            Server breaks the callback associated with the cached version
+            of that file--indicating to the Cache Manager that it needs to
+            update the cached copy.</para>
           </listitem>
 
           <listitem>
-            <para>When a File Server delivers a file from a read-only volume to the Cache Manager, the File Server sends along a
-            callback associated with the entire volume (so it does not need to send any more callbacks when it delivers additional
-            files from the volume). Only a single callback is required per accessed read-only volume because files in a read-only
-            volume can change only when a new version of the complete volume is released. All callbacks associated with the old
-            version of the volume are broken at release time.</para>
-          </listitem>
-        </itemizedlist></para>
-
-      <para>The callback mechanism ensures that the Cache Manager always requests the most up-to-date version of a file. However, it
-      does not ensure that the user necessarily notices the most current version as soon as the Cache Manager has it. That depends
-      on how often the application program requests additional data from the File System or how often it checks with the Cache
-      Manager.</para>
+            <para>When a File Server delivers a file from a read-only
+            volume to the Cache Manager, the File Server sends along a
+            callback associated with the entire volume (so it does not
+            need to send any more callbacks when it delivers additional
+            files from the volume). Only a single callback is required per
+            accessed read-only volume because files in a read-only volume
+            can change only when a new version of the complete volume is
+            released. All callbacks associated with the old version of the
+            volume are broken at release time.</para>
+          </listitem> </itemizedlist></para>
+
+      <para>The callback mechanism ensures that the Cache Manager always
+      requests the most up-to-date version of a file. However, it does not
+      ensure that the user necessarily notices the most current version as
+      soon as the Cache Manager has it. That depends on how often the
+      application program requests additional data from the File System or
+      how often it checks with the Cache Manager.</para>
     </sect2>
   </sect1>
 
       <tertiary>list of AFS</tertiary>
     </indexterm>
 
-    <para>As mentioned in <link linkend="HDRWQ10">Servers and Clients</link>, AFS file server machines run a number of processes,
-    each with a specialized function. One of the main responsibilities of a system administrator is to make sure that processes are
-    running correctly as much of the time as possible, using the administrative services that the server processes provide.</para>
-
-    <para>The following list briefly describes the function of each server process and the Cache Manager; the following sections
-    then discuss the important features in more detail.</para>
-
-    <para>The <emphasis>File Server</emphasis>, the most fundamental of the servers, delivers data files from the file server
-    machine to local workstations as requested, and stores the files again when the user saves any changes to the files.</para>
-
-    <para>The <emphasis>Basic OverSeer Server (BOS Server)</emphasis> ensures that the other server processes on its server machine
-    are running correctly as much of the time as possible, since a server is useful only if it is available. The BOS Server relieves
-    system administrators of much of the responsibility for overseeing system operations.</para>
-
-    <para>The third-party <emphasis>Kerberos Server</emphasis> replaces the old <emphasis>Authentication Server</emphasis> and helps ensure that communications on the network are secure. It verifies
-    user identities at login and provides the facilities through which participants in transactions prove their identities to one
-    another (mutually authenticate).</para>
-
-    <para>The Protection Server helps users control who has access to their files and directories. Users can grant access to several
-    other users at once by putting them all in a group entry in the Protection Database maintained by the Protection Server.</para>
-
-    <para>The <emphasis>Volume Server</emphasis> performs all types of volume manipulation. It helps the administrator move volumes
-    from one server machine to another to balance the workload among the various machines.</para>
-
-    <para>The <emphasis>Volume Location Server (VL Server)</emphasis> maintains the Volume Location Database (VLDB), in which it
-    records the location of volumes as they move from file server machine to file server machine. This service is the key to
-    transparent file access for users.</para>
-
-    <para>The <emphasis>Update Server</emphasis> distributes new versions of AFS server process software and configuration
-    information to all file server machines. It is crucial to stable system performance that all server machines run the same
-    software.</para>
-
-    <para>The <emphasis>Backup Server</emphasis> maintains the Backup Database, in which it stores information related to the Backup
-    System. It enables the administrator to back up data from volumes to tape. The data can then be restored from tape in the event
-    that it is lost from the file system.</para>
-
-    <para>The <emphasis>Salvager</emphasis> is not a server in the sense that others are. It runs only after the File Server or
-    Volume Server fails; it repairs any inconsistencies caused by the failure. The system administrator can invoke it directly if
-    necessary.</para>
-
-    <para>The <emphasis>Network Time Protocol Daemon (NTPD)</emphasis> is not an AFS server process per se, but plays a vital role
-    nonetheless. It synchronizes the internal clock on a file server machine with those on other machines. Synchronized clocks are
-    particularly important for correct functioning of the AFS distributed database technology (known as Ubik); see <link
-    linkend="HDRWQ103">Configuring the Cell for Proper Ubik Operation</link>. The NTPD is usually provided with the operating system.</para>
-
-    <para>The <emphasis>Cache Manager</emphasis> is the one component in this list that resides on AFS client rather than file
-    server machines. It not a process per se, but rather a part of the kernel on AFS client machines that communicates with AFS
-    server processes. Its main responsibilities are to retrieve files for application programs running on the client and to maintain
-    the files in the cache.</para>
+    <para>As mentioned in <link linkend="HDRWQ10">Servers and
+    Clients</link>, AFS file server machines run a number of processes,
+    each with a specialized function. One of the main responsibilities of
+    a system administrator is to make sure that processes are running
+    correctly as much of the time as possible, using the administrative
+    services that the server processes provide.</para>
+
+    <para>The following list briefly describes the function of each server
+    process and the Cache Manager; the following sections then discuss the
+    important features in more detail.</para>
+
+    <para>The <emphasis>File Server</emphasis>, the most fundamental of
+    the servers, delivers data files from the file server machine to local
+    workstations as requested, and stores the files again when the user
+    saves any changes to the files.</para>
+
+    <para>The <emphasis>Basic OverSeer Server (BOS Server)</emphasis>
+    ensures that the other server processes on its server machine are
+    running correctly as much of the time as possible, since a server is
+    useful only if it is available. The BOS Server relieves system
+    administrators of much of the responsibility for overseeing system
+    operations.</para>
+
+    <para>The third-party <emphasis>Kerberos Server</emphasis> replaces
+    the old <emphasis>Authentication Server</emphasis> and helps ensure
+    that communications on the network are secure. It verifies user
+    identities at login and provides the facilities through which
+    participants in transactions prove their identities to one another
+    (mutually authenticate).</para>
+
+    <para>The Protection Server helps users control who has access to
+    their files and directories. Users can grant access to several other
+    users at once by putting them all in a group entry in the Protection
+    Database maintained by the Protection Server.</para>
+
+    <para>The <emphasis>Volume Server</emphasis> performs all types of
+    volume manipulation. It helps the administrator move volumes from one
+    server machine to another to balance the workload among the various
+    machines.</para>
+
+    <para>The <emphasis>Volume Location Server (VL Server)</emphasis>
+    maintains the Volume Location Database (VLDB), in which it records the
+    location of volumes as they move from file server machine to file
+    server machine. This service is the key to transparent file access for
+    users.</para>
+
+    <para>The <emphasis>Update Server</emphasis> distributes new versions
+    of AFS server process software and configuration information to all
+    file server machines. It is crucial to stable system performance that
+    all server machines run the same software.</para>
+
+    <para>The <emphasis>Backup Server</emphasis> maintains the Backup
+    Database, in which it stores information related to the Backup
+    System. It enables the administrator to back up data from volumes to
+    tape. The data can then be restored from tape in the event that it is
+    lost from the file system.</para>
+
+    <para>The <emphasis>Salvager</emphasis> is not a server in the sense
+    that others are. It runs only after the File Server or Volume Server
+    fails; it repairs any inconsistencies caused by the failure. The
+    system administrator can invoke it directly if necessary.</para>
+
+    <para>The <emphasis>Network Time Protocol Daemon (NTPD)</emphasis> is
+    not an AFS server process per se, but plays a vital role
+    nonetheless. It synchronizes the internal clock on a file server
+    machine with those on other machines. Synchronized clocks are
+    particularly important for correct functioning of the AFS distributed
+    database technology (known as Ubik); see <link
+    linkend="HDRWQ103">Configuring the Cell for Proper Ubik
+    Operation</link>. The NTPD is usually provided with the operating
+    system.</para>
+
+    <para>The <emphasis>Cache Manager</emphasis> is the one component in
+    this list that resides on AFS client rather than file server
+    machines. It not a process per se, but rather a part of the kernel on
+    AFS client machines that communicates with AFS server processes. Its
+    main responsibilities are to retrieve files for application programs
+    running on the client and to maintain the files in the cache.</para>
 
     <sect2 id="HDRWQ18">
       <title>The File Server</title>
         <secondary>description</secondary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>The <emphasis>File Server</emphasis> is the most fundamental of the AFS server processes and runs on each file server
-      machine. It provides the same services across the network that the UNIX file system provides on the local disk: <itemizedlist>
+      <para>The <emphasis>File Server</emphasis> is the most fundamental
+      of the AFS server processes and runs on each file server machine. It
+      provides the same services across the network that the UNIX file
+      system provides on the local disk: <itemizedlist>
           <listitem>
-            <para>Delivering programs and data files to client workstations as requested and storing them again when the client
-            workstation finishes with them.</para>
+            <para>Delivering programs and data files to client
+            workstations as requested and storing them again when the
+            client workstation finishes with them.</para>
           </listitem>
 
           <listitem>
-            <para>Maintaining the hierarchical directory structure that users create to organize their files.</para>
-          </listitem>
+            <para>Maintaining the hierarchical directory structure that
+          users create to organize their files.</para> </listitem>
 
           <listitem>
-            <para>Handling requests for copying, moving, creating, and deleting files and directories.</para>
-          </listitem>
+            <para>Handling requests for copying, moving, creating, and
+          deleting files and directories.</para> </listitem>
 
           <listitem>
-            <para>Keeping track of status information about each file and directory (including its size and latest modification
+            <para>Keeping track of status information about each file and
+            directory (including its size and latest modification
             time).</para>
           </listitem>
 
           <listitem>
-            <para>Making sure that users are authorized to perform the actions they request on particular files or
+            <para>Making sure that users are authorized to perform the
+            actions they request on particular files or
             directories.</para>
           </listitem>
 
           </listitem>
 
           <listitem>
-            <para>Granting advisory locks (corresponding to UNIX locks) on request.</para>
-          </listitem>
-        </itemizedlist></para>
+            <para>Granting advisory locks (corresponding to UNIX locks) on
+          request.</para> </listitem>
+        </itemizedlist>
+      </para>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 id="HDRWQ19">
         <secondary>description</secondary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>The <emphasis>Basic OverSeer Server (BOS Server)</emphasis> reduces the demands on system administrators by constantly
-      monitoring the processes running on its file server machine. It can restart failed processes automatically and provides a
-      convenient interface for administrative tasks.</para>
+      <para>The <emphasis>Basic OverSeer Server (BOS Server)</emphasis>
+      reduces the demands on system administrators by constantly
+      monitoring the processes running on its file server machine. It can
+      restart failed processes automatically and provides a convenient
+      interface for administrative tasks.</para>
 
-      <para>The BOS Server runs on every file server machine. Its primary function is to minimize system outages. It also</para>
+      <para>The BOS Server runs on every file server machine. Its primary
+      function is to minimize system outages. It also</para>
 
       <itemizedlist>
         <listitem>
-          <para>Constantly monitors the other server processes (on the local machine) to make sure they are running
-          correctly.</para>
+          <para>Constantly monitors the other server processes (on the
+          local machine) to make sure they are running correctly.</para>
         </listitem>
 
         <listitem>
-          <para>Automatically restarts failed processes, without contacting a human operator. When restarting multiple server
-          processes simultaneously, the BOS server takes interdependencies into account and initiates restarts in the correct
-          order.</para>
+          <para>Automatically restarts failed processes, without
+          contacting a human operator. When restarting multiple server
+          processes simultaneously, the BOS server takes interdependencies
+          into account and initiates restarts in the correct order.</para>
 
           <indexterm>
             <primary>system outages</primary>
         </listitem>
 
         <listitem>
-          <para>Accepts requests from the system administrator. Common reasons to contact BOS are to verify the status of server
-          processes on file server machines, install and start new processes, stop processes either temporarily or permanently, and
+          <para>Accepts requests from the system administrator. Common
+          reasons to contact BOS are to verify the status of server
+          processes on file server machines, install and start new
+          processes, stop processes either temporarily or permanently, and
           restart dead processes manually.</para>
         </listitem>
 
         <listitem>
-          <para>Helps system administrators to manage system configuration information. The BOS server automates the process of
-          adding and changing <emphasis>server encryption keys</emphasis>, which are important in mutual authentication. The BOS
-          Server also provides a simple interface for modifying two files that contain information about privileged users and
-          certain special file server machines. For more details about these configuration files, see <link linkend="HDRWQ85">Common
-          Configuration Files in the /usr/afs/etc Directory</link>.</para>
-        </listitem>
-      </itemizedlist>
+          <para>Helps system administrators to manage system configuration
+          information. The BOS server automates the process of adding and
+          changing <emphasis>server encryption keys</emphasis>, which are
+          important in mutual authentication. The BOS Server also provides
+          a simple interface for modifying two files that contain
+          information about privileged users and certain special file
+          server machines. For more details about these configuration
+          files, see <link linkend="HDRWQ85">Common Configuration Files in
+          the /usr/afs/etc Directory</link>.</para>
+        </listitem> </itemizedlist>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 id="HDRWQ20">
 
       <indexterm>
         <primary>Kerberos Server</primary>
-
         <secondary>description</secondary>
       </indexterm>
       <indexterm>
         <primary>Authentication Server</primary>
-
         <secondary>description</secondary>
         <seealso>Kerberos Server</seealso>
       </indexterm>
         <secondary>Kerberos Server</secondary>
       </indexterm>
 
-
-      
-      <para>The <emphasis>Kerberos Server</emphasis> performs two main functions related to network security: <itemizedlist>
+      <para>The <emphasis>Kerberos Server</emphasis> performs two main
+      functions related to network security: <itemizedlist>
           <listitem>
-            <para>Verifying the identity of users as they log into the system by requiring that they provide a password. The
-            Kerberos Server grants the user a ticket, which is converted into a token to prove to AFS server processes that the user has authenticated. For more
-            on tokens, see <link linkend="HDRWQ76">Complex Mutual Authentication</link>.</para>
+            <para>Verifying the identity of users as they log into the
+            system by requiring that they provide a password. The Kerberos
+            Server grants the user a ticket, which is converted into a
+            token to prove to AFS server processes that the user has
+            authenticated. For more on tokens, see <link
+            linkend="HDRWQ76">Complex Mutual Authentication</link>.</para>
           </listitem>
 
           <listitem>
-            <para>Providing the means through which server and client processes prove their identities to each other (mutually
-            authenticate). This helps to create a secure environment in which to send cross-network messages.</para>
-          </listitem>
-        </itemizedlist></para>
+            <para>Providing the means through which server and client
+            processes prove their identities to each other (mutually
+            authenticate). This helps to create a secure environment in
+            which to send cross-network messages.</para>
+          </listitem> </itemizedlist></para>
 
       <para>The Kerberos Server is a required service which is provided by
       a third-party Kerberos server that supports version 5 of the
       operating systems or may be acquired separately. MIT Kerberos,
       Heimdal, and Microsoft Active Directory are known to work with
       OpenAFS as a Kerberos Server.  (Most Kerberos commands begin with
-      the letter
-      <emphasis role="bold">k</emphasis>). This technology was originally developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's
+      the letter <emphasis role="bold">k</emphasis>). This technology was
+      originally developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's
       Project Athena.</para>
 
-      <para>The Kerberos Server also maintains the <emphasis>Authentication Database</emphasis>, in which it stores user
-      passwords converted into encryption key form as well as the AFS server encryption key. To learn more about the procedures AFS
-      uses to verify user identity and during mutual authentication, see <link linkend="HDRWQ75">A More Detailed Look at Mutual
+      <para>The Kerberos Server also maintains the
+      <emphasis>Authentication Database</emphasis>, in which it stores
+      user passwords converted into encryption key form as well as the AFS
+      server encryption key. To learn more about the procedures AFS uses
+      to verify user identity and during mutual authentication, see <link
+      linkend="HDRWQ75">A More Detailed Look at Mutual
       Authentication</link>.</para>
 
       <note><para>The <emphasis>Authentication Server</emphasis> known as
       the Kerberos Server. All references to the <emphasis>Kerberos
       Server</emphasis> in this guide refer to a Kerberos 5
       server.</para></note>
-      
 
       <indexterm>
         <primary>AFS</primary>
         <secondary>in UNIX</secondary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>The <emphasis>Protection Server</emphasis> is the key to AFS's refinement of the normal UNIX methods for protecting
-      files and directories from unauthorized use. The refinements include the following: <itemizedlist>
+      <para>The <emphasis>Protection Server</emphasis> is the key to AFS's
+      refinement of the normal UNIX methods for protecting files and
+      directories from unauthorized use. The refinements include the
+      following: <itemizedlist>
           <listitem>
-            <para>Defining seven access permissions rather than the standard UNIX file system's three. In conjunction with the UNIX
-            mode bits associated with each file and directory element, AFS associates an <emphasis>access control list
-            (ACL)</emphasis> with each directory. The ACL specifies which users have which of the seven specific permissions for the
-            directory and all the files it contains. For a definition of AFS's seven access permissions and how users can set them
-            on access control lists, see <link linkend="HDRWQ562">Managing Access Control Lists</link>.</para>
+            <para>Defining seven access permissions rather than the
+            standard UNIX file system's three. In conjunction with the
+            UNIX mode bits associated with each file and directory
+            element, AFS associates an <emphasis>access control list
+            (ACL)</emphasis> with each directory. The ACL specifies which
+            users have which of the seven specific permissions for the
+            directory and all the files it contains. For a definition of
+            AFS's seven access permissions and how users can set them on
+            access control lists, see <link linkend="HDRWQ562">Managing
+            Access Control Lists</link>.</para>
 
             <indexterm>
               <primary>access</primary>
           </listitem>
 
           <listitem>
-            <para>Enabling users to grant permissions to numerous individual users--a different combination to each individual if
-            desired. UNIX protection distinguishes only between three user or groups: the owner of the file, members of a single
-            specified group, and everyone who can access the local file system.</para>
+            <para>Enabling users to grant permissions to numerous
+            individual users--a different combination to each individual
+            if desired. UNIX protection distinguishes only between three
+            user or groups: the owner of the file, members of a single
+            specified group, and everyone who can access the local file
+            system.</para>
           </listitem>
 
           <listitem>
-            <para>Enabling users to define their own groups of users, recorded in the <emphasis>Protection Database</emphasis>
-            maintained by the Protection Server. The groups then appear on directories' access control lists as though they were
-            individuals, which enables the granting of permissions to many users simultaneously.</para>
+            <para>Enabling users to define their own groups of users,
+            recorded in the <emphasis>Protection Database</emphasis>
+            maintained by the Protection Server. The groups then appear on
+            directories' access control lists as though they were
+            individuals, which enables the granting of permissions to many
+            users simultaneously.</para>
           </listitem>
 
           <listitem>
-            <para>Enabling system administrators to create groups containing client machine IP addresses to permit access when it
-            originates from the specified client machines. These types of groups are useful when it is necessary to adhere to
+            <para>Enabling system administrators to create groups
+            containing client machine IP addresses to permit access when
+            it originates from the specified client machines. These types
+            of groups are useful when it is necessary to adhere to
             machine-based licensing restrictions.</para>
           </listitem>
-        </itemizedlist></para>
+        </itemizedlist>
+      </para>
 
       <indexterm>
         <primary>group</primary>
         <primary>Protection Database</primary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>The Protection Server's main duty is to help the File Server determine if a user is authorized to access a file in the
-      requested manner. The Protection Server creates a list of all the groups to which the user belongs. The File Server then
-      compares this list to the ACL associated with the file's parent directory. A user thus acquires access both as an individual
-      and as a member of any groups.</para>
-
-      <para>The Protection Server also maps usernames (the name typed at the login prompt) to <emphasis>AFS user ID</emphasis>
-      numbers (<emphasis>AFS UIDs</emphasis>). These UIDs are functionally equivalent to UNIX UIDs, but operate in the domain of AFS
-      rather than in the UNIX file system on a machine's local disk. This conversion service is essential because the tokens that
-      the Authentication Server grants to authenticated users are stamped with usernames (to comply with Kerberos standards). The
-      AFS server processes identify users by AFS UID, not by username. Before they can understand whom the token represents, they
-      need the Protection Server to translate the username into an AFS UID. For further discussion of tokens, see <link
-      linkend="HDRWQ75">A More Detailed Look at Mutual Authentication</link>.</para>
+      <para>The Protection Server's main duty is to help the File Server
+      determine if a user is authorized to access a file in the requested
+      manner. The Protection Server creates a list of all the groups to
+      which the user belongs. The File Server then compares this list to
+      the ACL associated with the file's parent directory. A user thus
+      acquires access both as an individual and as a member of any
+      groups.</para>
+
+      <para>The Protection Server also maps usernames (the name typed at
+      the login prompt) to <emphasis>AFS user ID</emphasis> numbers
+      (<emphasis>AFS UIDs</emphasis>). These UIDs are functionally
+      equivalent to UNIX UIDs, but operate in the domain of AFS rather
+      than in the UNIX file system on a machine's local disk. This
+      conversion service is essential because the tokens that the
+      Authentication Server grants to authenticated users are stamped with
+      usernames (to comply with Kerberos standards). The AFS server
+      processes identify users by AFS UID, not by username. Before they
+      can understand whom the token represents, they need the Protection
+      Server to translate the username into an AFS UID. For further
+      discussion of tokens, see <link linkend="HDRWQ75">A More Detailed
+      Look at Mutual Authentication</link>.</para>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 id="HDRWQ22">
         <secondary>description</secondary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>The <emphasis>Volume Server</emphasis> provides the interface through which you create, delete, move, and replicate
-      volumes, as well as prepare them for archiving to tape or other media (backing up). <link linkend="HDRWQ13">Volumes</link>
-      explained the advantages gained by storing files in volumes. Creating and deleting volumes are necessary when adding and
-      removing users from the system; volume moves are done for load balancing; and replication enables volume placement on multiple
-      file server machines (for more on replication, see <link linkend="HDRWQ15">Replication</link>).</para>
+      <para>The <emphasis>Volume Server</emphasis> provides the interface
+      through which you create, delete, move, and replicate volumes, as
+      well as prepare them for archiving to tape or other media (backing
+      up). <link linkend="HDRWQ13">Volumes</link> explained the advantages
+      gained by storing files in volumes. Creating and deleting volumes
+      are necessary when adding and removing users from the system; volume
+      moves are done for load balancing; and replication enables volume
+      placement on multiple file server machines (for more on replication,
+      see <link linkend="HDRWQ15">Replication</link>).</para>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 id="HDRWQ23">
         <primary>VLDB</primary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>The <emphasis>VL Server</emphasis> maintains a complete list of volume locations in the <emphasis>Volume Location
-      Database (VLDB)</emphasis>. When the Cache Manager (see <link linkend="HDRWQ28">The Cache Manager</link>) begins to fill a
-      file request from an application program, it first contacts the VL Server in order to learn which file server machine
-      currently houses the volume containing the file. The Cache Manager then requests the file from the File Server process running
-      on that file server machine.</para>
+      <para>The <emphasis>VL Server</emphasis> maintains a complete list
+      of volume locations in the <emphasis>Volume Location Database
+      (VLDB)</emphasis>. When the Cache Manager (see <link
+      linkend="HDRWQ28">The Cache Manager</link>) begins to fill a file
+      request from an application program, it first contacts the VL Server
+      in order to learn which file server machine currently houses the
+      volume containing the file. The Cache Manager then requests the file
+      from the File Server process running on that file server
+      machine.</para>
 
-      <para>The VLDB and VL Server make it possible for AFS to take advantage of the increased system availability gained by using
-      multiple file server machines, because the Cache Manager knows where to find a particular file. Indeed, in a certain sense the
-      VL Server is the keystone of the entire file system--when the information in the VLDB is inaccessible, the Cache Manager
-      cannot retrieve files, even if the File Server processes are working properly. A list of the information stored in the VLDB
-      about each volume is provided in <link linkend="HDRWQ180">Volume Information in the VLDB</link>.</para>
+      <para>The VLDB and VL Server make it possible for AFS to take
+      advantage of the increased system availability gained by using
+      multiple file server machines, because the Cache Manager knows where
+      to find a particular file. Indeed, in a certain sense the VL Server
+      is the keystone of the entire file system--when the information in
+      the VLDB is inaccessible, the Cache Manager cannot retrieve files,
+      even if the File Server processes are working properly. A list of
+      the information stored in the VLDB about each volume is provided in
+      <link linkend="HDRWQ180">Volume Information in the
+      VLDB</link>.</para>
 
       <indexterm>
         <primary>VL Server</primary>
         <secondary>description</secondary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>The <emphasis>Update Server</emphasis> is an optional process that helps guarantee that all file server machines are running the same version of a
-      server process. System performance can be inconsistent if some machines are running one version of the BOS Server (for
-      example) and other machines were running another version.</para>
-
-      <para>To ensure that all machines run the same version of a process, install new software on a single file server machine of
-      each system type, called the <emphasis>binary distribution machine</emphasis> for that type. The binary distribution machine
-      runs the server portion of the Update Server, whereas all the other machines of that type run the client portion of the Update
-      Server. The client portions check frequently with the <emphasis>server portion</emphasis> to see if they are running the right
-      version of every process; if not, the <emphasis>client portion</emphasis> retrieves the right version from the binary
-      distribution machine and installs it locally. The system administrator does not need to remember to install new software
-      individually on all the file server machines: the Update Server does it automatically. For more on binary distribution
-      machines, see <link linkend="HDRWQ93">Binary Distribution Machines</link>.</para>
+      <para>The <emphasis>Update Server</emphasis> is an optional process
+      that helps guarantee that all file server machines are running the
+      same version of a server process. System performance can be
+      inconsistent if some machines are running one version of the BOS
+      Server (for example) and other machines were running another
+      version.</para>
+
+      <para>To ensure that all machines run the same version of a process,
+      install new software on a single file server machine of each system
+      type, called the <emphasis>binary distribution machine</emphasis>
+      for that type. The binary distribution machine runs the server
+      portion of the Update Server, whereas all the other machines of that
+      type run the client portion of the Update Server. The client
+      portions check frequently with the <emphasis>server
+      portion</emphasis> to see if they are running the right version of
+      every process; if not, the <emphasis>client portion</emphasis>
+      retrieves the right version from the binary distribution machine and
+      installs it locally. The system administrator does not need to
+      remember to install new software individually on all the file server
+      machines: the Update Server does it automatically. For more on
+      binary distribution machines, see <link linkend="HDRWQ93">Binary
+      Distribution Machines</link>.</para>
 
       <indexterm>
         <primary>Update Server</primary>
         <secondary>client portion</secondary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>The Update Server also distributes configuration files that all file
-      server machines need to store on their local disks (for a description of the contents and purpose of these files, see <link
-      linkend="HDRWQ85">Common Configuration Files in the /usr/afs/etc Directory</link>). As with server process software, the need
-      for consistent system performance demands that all the machines have the same version of these files.
-      The system administrator needs to make changes to these files on one machine only, the cell's <emphasis>system
-      control machine</emphasis>, which runs a server portion of the Update Server. All other machines in the cell run a client
-      portion that accesses the correct versions of these configuration files from the system control machine. Cells running the
-      international edition of AFS do not use a system control machine to distribute configuration files. For more information, see
-      <link linkend="HDRWQ94">The System Control Machine</link>.</para>
+      <para>The Update Server also distributes configuration files that
+      all file server machines need to store on their local disks (for a
+      description of the contents and purpose of these files, see <link
+      linkend="HDRWQ85">Common Configuration Files in the /usr/afs/etc
+      Directory</link>). As with server process software, the need for
+      consistent system performance demands that all the machines have the
+      same version of these files.  The system administrator needs to make
+      changes to these files on one machine only, the cell's
+      <emphasis>system control machine</emphasis>, which runs a server
+      portion of the Update Server. All other machines in the cell run a
+      client portion that accesses the correct versions of these
+      configuration files from the system control machine. Cells running
+      the international edition of AFS do not use a system control machine
+      to distribute configuration files. For more information, see <link
+      linkend="HDRWQ94">The System Control Machine</link>.</para>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 id="HDRWQ25">
         <secondary>description</secondary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>The <emphasis>Backup Server</emphasis> maintains the information in the <emphasis>Backup Database</emphasis>. The Backup
-      Server and the Backup Database enable administrators to back up data from AFS volumes to tape and restore it from tape to the
-      file system if necessary. The server and database together are referred to as the Backup System.</para>
-
-      <para>Administrators initially configure the Backup System by defining sets of volumes to be dumped together and the schedule
-      by which the sets are to be dumped. They also install the system's tape drives and define the drives' <emphasis>Tape
-      Coordinators</emphasis>, which are the processes that control the tape drives.</para>
-
-      <para>Once the Backup System is configured, user and system data can be dumped from volumes to tape or disk. In the event that data is
-      ever lost from the system (for example, if a system or disk failure causes data to be lost), administrators can restore the
-      data from tape. If tapes are periodically archived, or saved, data can also be restored to its state at a specific time.
-      Additionally, because Backup System data is difficult to reproduce, the Backup Database itself can be backed up to tape and
-      restored if it ever becomes corrupted. For more information on configuring and using the Backup System, see <link
-      linkend="HDRWQ248">Configuring the AFS Backup System</link> and <link linkend="HDRWQ283">Backing Up and Restoring AFS
-      Data</link>.</para>
+      <para>The <emphasis>Backup Server</emphasis> maintains the
+      information in the <emphasis>Backup Database</emphasis>. The Backup
+      Server and the Backup Database enable administrators to back up data
+      from AFS volumes to tape and restore it from tape to the file system
+      if necessary. The server and database together are referred to as
+      the Backup System.</para>
+
+      <para>Administrators initially configure the Backup System by
+      defining sets of volumes to be dumped together and the schedule by
+      which the sets are to be dumped. They also install the system's tape
+      drives and define the drives' <emphasis>Tape
+      Coordinators</emphasis>, which are the processes that control the
+      tape drives.</para>
+
+      <para>Once the Backup System is configured, user and system data can
+      be dumped from volumes to tape or disk. In the event that data is
+      ever lost from the system (for example, if a system or disk failure
+      causes data to be lost), administrators can restore the data from
+      tape. If tapes are periodically archived, or saved, data can also be
+      restored to its state at a specific time.  Additionally, because
+      Backup System data is difficult to reproduce, the Backup Database
+      itself can be backed up to tape and restored if it ever becomes
+      corrupted. For more information on configuring and using the Backup
+      System, see <link linkend="HDRWQ248">Configuring the AFS Backup
+      System</link> and <link linkend="HDRWQ283">Backing Up and Restoring
+      AFS Data</link>.</para>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 id="HDRWQ26">
         <secondary>description</secondary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>The <emphasis>Salvager</emphasis> differs from other AFS Servers in that it runs only at selected times. The BOS Server
-      invokes the Salvager when the File Server, Volume Server, or both fail. The Salvager attempts to repair disk corruption that
-      can result from a failure.</para>
+      <para>The <emphasis>Salvager</emphasis> differs from other AFS
+      Servers in that it runs only at selected times. The BOS Server
+      invokes the Salvager when the File Server, Volume Server, or both
+      fail. The Salvager attempts to repair disk corruption that can
+      result from a failure.</para>
 
-      <para>As a system administrator, you can also invoke the Salvager as necessary, even if the File Server or Volume Server has
-      not failed. See <link linkend="HDRWQ232">Salvaging Volumes</link>.</para>
+      <para>As a system administrator, you can also invoke the Salvager as
+      necessary, even if the File Server or Volume Server has not
+      failed. See <link linkend="HDRWQ232">Salvaging
+      Volumes</link>.</para>
     </sect2>
 
     <sect2 id="HDRWQ27">
         <secondary>description</secondary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>The <emphasis>Network Time Protocol Daemon (NTPD)</emphasis> is not an AFS server process per se, but plays an important
-      role. It helps guarantee that all of the file server machines and client machines agree on the time. The NTPD on all file server machines learns the correct time from a parent NTPD source, which may be located inside or outside the cell.</para>
-
-      <para>Keeping clocks synchronized is particularly important to the correct operation of AFS's distributed database technology,
-      which coordinates the copies of the Backup, Protection, and Volume Location Databases; see <link
-      linkend="HDRWQ52">Replicating the OpenAFS Administrative Databases</link>. Client machines may also refer to these clocks for the
-      correct time; therefore, it is less confusing if all file server machines have the same time. For more technical detail about
-      the NTPD, see <ulink url="http://www.ntp.org/">The NTP web site</ulink> or the documentation for your operating system.</para>
-
-      <important><title>Clock Skew Impact</title>
-      <para>Client machines that are authenticating to an OpenAFS cell
-      with valid credentials may still fail when the clocks of the client
-      machine, Kerberos server, and the fileserver machines are not in
+      <para>The <emphasis>Network Time Protocol Daemon (NTPD)</emphasis>
+      is not an AFS server process per se, but plays an important role. It
+      helps guarantee that all of the file server machines and client
+      machines agree on the time. The NTPD on all file server machines
+      learns the correct time from a parent NTPD source, which may be
+      located inside or outside the cell.</para>
+
+      <para>Keeping clocks synchronized is particularly important to the
+      correct operation of AFS's distributed database technology, which
+      coordinates the copies of the Backup, Protection, and Volume
+      Location Databases; see <link linkend="HDRWQ52">Replicating the
+      OpenAFS Administrative Databases</link>. Client machines may also
+      refer to these clocks for the correct time; therefore, it is less
+      confusing if all file server machines have the same time. For more
+      technical detail about the NTPD, see <ulink
+      url="http://www.ntp.org/">The NTP web site</ulink> or the
+      documentation for your operating system.</para>
+
+      <important><title>Clock Skew Impact</title> <para>Client machines
+      that are authenticating to an OpenAFS cell with valid credentials
+      may still fail when the clocks of the client machine, Kerberos
+      server, and the fileserver machines are not in
       sync.</para></important>
 
-      <note><title>Legacy runntp</title>
-      <para>It is no longer recommended to run the legacy NTPD process
-      called <emphasis>runntp</emphasis> that is part of the OpenAFS
-      suite. Running the NTPD software that comes with your operating
-      system or from <ulink url="http://www.ntp.org/">www.ntp.org</ulink>
-      is preferred.</para></note>
+      <note><title>Legacy runntp</title> <para>It is no longer recommended
+      to run the legacy NTPD process called <emphasis>runntp</emphasis>
+      that is part of the OpenAFS suite. Running the NTPD software that
+      comes with your operating system or from <ulink
+      url="http://www.ntp.org/">www.ntp.org</ulink> is
+      preferred.</para></note>
 
     </sect2>
 
         <secondary>functions of</secondary>
       </indexterm>
 
-      <para>As already mentioned in <link linkend="HDRWQ16">Caching and Callbacks</link>, the <emphasis>Cache Manager</emphasis> is
-      the one component in this section that resides on client machines rather than on file server machines. It is not technically a
-      stand-alone process, but rather a set of extensions or modifications in the client machine's kernel that enable communication
-      with the server processes running on server machines. Its main duty is to translate file requests (made by application
-      programs on client machines) into <emphasis>remote procedure calls (RPCs)</emphasis> to the File Server. (The Cache Manager
-      first contacts the VL Server to find out which File Server currently houses the volume that contains a requested file, as
-      mentioned in <link linkend="HDRWQ23">The Volume Location (VL) Server</link>). When the Cache Manager receives the requested
-      file, it caches it before passing data on to the application program.</para>
-
-      <para>The Cache Manager also tracks the state of files in its cache compared to the version at the File Server by storing the
-      callbacks sent by the File Server. When the File Server breaks a callback, indicating that a file or volume changed, the Cache
-      Manager requests a copy of the new version before providing more data to application programs.</para>
+      <para>As already mentioned in <link linkend="HDRWQ16">Caching and
+      Callbacks</link>, the <emphasis>Cache Manager</emphasis> is the one
+      component in this section that resides on client machines rather
+      than on file server machines. It is not technically a stand-alone
+      process, but rather a set of extensions or modifications in the
+      client machine's kernel that enable communication with the server
+      processes running on server machines. Its main duty is to translate
+      file requests (made by application programs on client machines) into
+      <emphasis>remote procedure calls (RPCs)</emphasis> to the File
+      Server. (The Cache Manager first contacts the VL Server to find out
+      which File Server currently houses the volume that contains a
+      requested file, as mentioned in <link linkend="HDRWQ23">The Volume
+      Location (VL) Server</link>). When the Cache Manager receives the
+      requested file, it caches it before passing data on to the
+      application program.</para>
+
+      <para>The Cache Manager also tracks the state of files in its cache
+      compared to the version at the File Server by storing the callbacks
+      sent by the File Server. When the File Server breaks a callback,
+      indicating that a file or volume changed, the Cache Manager requests
+      a copy of the new version before providing more data to application
+      programs.</para>
     </sect2>
   </sect1>
 </chapter>