none
[openafs-wiki.git] / AFSLore / AFSFrequentlyAskedQuestions.mdwn
1 This is a work-in-progress. My plan is to wikify the existing text, make any updates/corections/additions I can, and then announce the updated FAQ's exisatance to openafs-info. I have tried to contact the current maintainer, but recieved no response - but the last updated date being what it is, perhaps he has a new email.
2
3 Status:
4
5 - Formatting Pass: Up to 1.11
6 - Update Pass: Not Started
7 - Editing Pass: Not Started
8
9 -- [[DanielClark]] - 21 Jan 2002
10
11 ----
12
13 Archive-name: afs-faq Version: 1.113 Last-modified: 1950 Thursday 9th July 1998
14
15 # <a name="AFS frequently asked questions"></a> AFS frequently asked questions
16
17 ----
18
19 This posting contains answers to frequently asked questions about AFS. Your comments and contributions are welcome (email: <mpb@acm.org>)
20
21 Most newsreaders can skip from topic to topic with control-G.
22
23 <dl>
24   <dt> URLs</dt>
25   <dd><a href="file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afs-contrib/doc/faq/afs-faq.html" target="_top">file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afs-contrib/doc/faq/afs-faq.html</a> <a href="ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afs-contrib/doc/faq/afs-faq.html" target="_top">ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afs-contrib/doc/faq/afs-faq.html</a> <a href="http://www.angelfire.com/hi/plutonic/afs-faq.html" target="_top">http://www.angelfire.com/hi/plutonic/afs-faq.html</a></dd>
26 </dl>
27
28 ----
29
30 <div>
31   <ul>
32     <li><a href="#AFS frequently asked questions"> AFS frequently asked questions</a><ul>
33         <li><a href="#0  Preamble"> 0 Preamble</a><ul>
34             <li><a href="#0.01  Purpose and audience"> 0.01 Purpose and audience</a></li>
35             <li><a href="#0.02  Acknowledgements"> 0.02 Acknowledgements</a></li>
36             <li><a href="#0.03  Disclaimer"> 0.03 Disclaimer</a></li>
37             <li><a href="#0.04  Release Notes"> 0.04 Release Notes</a></li>
38             <li><a href="#0.05  Quote"> 0.05 Quote</a></li>
39           </ul>
40         </li>
41         <li><a href="#1  General"> 1 General</a><ul>
42             <li><a href="#1.01  What is AFS?"> 1.01 What is AFS?</a></li>
43             <li><a href="#1.02  Who supplies AFS?"> 1.02 Who supplies AFS?</a></li>
44             <li><a href="#1.03  What is /afs?"> 1.03 What is /afs?</a></li>
45             <li><a href="#1.04  What is an AFS cell?"> 1.04 What is an AFS cell?</a></li>
46             <li><a href="#1.05  What are the benefits of u"> 1.05 What are the benefits of using AFS?</a><ul>
47                 <li><a href="#1.05.a  Cache Manager"> 1.05.a Cache Manager</a></li>
48                 <li><a href="#1.05.b  Location independence"> 1.05.b Location independence</a></li>
49                 <li><a href="#1.05.c  Scalability"> 1.05.c Scalability</a></li>
50                 <li><a href="#1.05.d  Improved security"> 1.05.d Improved security</a></li>
51                 <li><a href="#1.05.e  Single systems image (SS"> 1.05.e Single systems image (SSI)</a></li>
52                 <li><a href="#1.05.f  Replicated AFS volumes"> 1.05.f Replicated AFS volumes</a></li>
53                 <li><a href="#1.05.g  Improved robustness to s"> 1.05.g Improved robustness to server crash</a></li>
54                 <li><a href="#1.05.h  "Easy to use" networking"> 1.05.h "Easy to use" networking</a></li>
55                 <li><a href="#1.05.i  Communications protocol"> 1.05.i Communications protocol</a></li>
56                 <li><a href="#1.05.j  Improved system manageme"> 1.05.j Improved system management capability</a></li>
57               </ul>
58             </li>
59             <li><a href="#1.06  Which systems is AFS avail"> 1.06 Which systems is AFS available for?</a></li>
60             <li><a href="#1.07  What does "ls /afs" displa"> 1.07 What does "ls /afs" display in the Internet AFS filetree?</a></li>
61             <li><a href="#1.08  Why does AFS use Kerberos"> 1.08 Why does AFS use Kerberos authentication?</a></li>
62             <li><a href="#1.09  Does AFS work over protoco"> 1.09 Does AFS work over protocols other than TCP/IP?</a></li>
63             <li><a href="#1.10  How can I access AFS from"> 1.10 How can I access AFS from my PC?</a></li>
64             <li><a href="#1.11  How does AFS compare with"> 1.11 How does AFS compare with NFS?</a></li>
65           </ul>
66         </li>
67       </ul>
68     </li>
69   </ul>
70 </div>
71
72 ----
73
74 ## <a name="0  Preamble"></a> 0 Preamble
75
76 ### <a name="0.01  Purpose and audience"></a> 0.01 Purpose and audience
77
78 The aim of this compilation is to provide information about AFS including:
79
80 - A brief introduction
81 - Answers to some often asked questions
82 - Pointers to further information
83
84 Definitive and detailed information on AFS is provided in Transarc's AFS manuals ([23], [24], [25]).
85
86 The intended audience ranges from people who know little of the subject and want to know more to those who have experience with AFS and wish to share useful information by contributing to the faq.
87
88 ### <a name="0.02  Acknowledgements"></a> 0.02 Acknowledgements
89
90 The information presented here has been gleaned from many sources. Some material has been directly contributed by people listed below.
91
92 - I would like to thank the following for contributing:
93   - Pierette Maniago VanRyzin (Transarc)
94   - Lyle Seaman (Transarc)
95   - Joseph Jackson (Transarc)
96   - Dan Lovinger (Microsoft)
97   - Lucien Van Elsen (IBM)
98   - Jim Rees (University of Michigan)
99   - Derrick J. Brashear (Carnegie Mellon University)
100   - Hans-Werner Paulsen (MPI fuer Astrophysik, Garching)
101   - Margo Hikida (Hewlett Packard)
102   - Michael Fagan (IBM)
103   - Robert Malick (National Institute of Health, USA)
104   - Rainer Toebbicke (European Laboratory for Particle Physics, CERN)
105   - Mic Bowman (Transarc)
106   - Mike Prince (IBM)
107   - Bob Oesterlin (IBM)
108   - Pat Wilson (Dartmouth College)
109   - Cristian Espinoza (Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile)
110   - Mary Ann DelBusso (Transarc)
111   - Michael Niksch (IBM)
112   - Kelly Chambers (Transarc)
113
114 - Thanks also to indirect contributors:
115   - Ken Paquette (IBM)
116   - Lance Pickup (IBM)
117   - Lisa Chavez (IBM)
118   - Dawn E. Johnson (Transarc)
119   - David Snearline (University of Michigan Engineering)
120   - Rens Troost (New Century Systems)
121   - Anton Knaus (Carnegie Mellon University)
122   - Mike Shaddock (SAS Institute Inc.)
123
124 If this compilation has any merit then much credit belongs to Pierette for giving inspiration, support, answers, and proof-reading.
125
126 ### <a name="0.03  Disclaimer"></a> 0.03 Disclaimer
127
128 I make no representation about the suitability of this information for any purpose.
129
130 While every effort is made to keep the information in this document accurate and current, it is provided "as is" with no warranty expressed or implied.
131
132 ### <a name="0.04  Release Notes"></a> 0.04 Release Notes
133
134 This compilation contains material used with permission of Transarc Corporation. Permission to copy is given provided any copyright notices and acknowledgements are retained.
135
136 Column 1 is used to indicate changes from the last issue:
137
138 - N = new item
139 - U = updated item
140
141 Changes from the last version are to be found at the end of this file.
142
143 ----
144
145 ### <a name="0.05  Quote"></a> 0.05 Quote
146
147        "'Tis true; there's magic in the web of it;"         Othello, Act 3 Scene 4
148                                                  --William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
149
150 ----
151
152 ## <a name="1  General"></a> 1 General
153
154 ### <a name="1.01  What is AFS?"></a> 1.01 What is AFS?
155
156 AFS is a distributed filesystem that enables co-operating hosts (clients and servers) to efficiently share filesystem resources across both local area and wide area networks.
157
158 AFS is marketed, maintained, and extended by Transarc Corporation.
159
160 AFS is based on a distributed file system originally developed at the Information Technology Center at Carnegie-Mellon University that was called the "Andrew File System".
161
162 "Andrew" was the name of the research project at CMU - honouring th founders of the University. Once Transarc was formed and AFS became a product, the "Andrew" was dropped to indicate that AFS had gone beyond the Andrew research project and had become a supported, product quality filesystem. However, there were a number of existing cells that rooted their filesystem as /afs. At the time, changing the root of the filesystem was a non-trivial undertaking. So, to save the early AFS sites from having to rename their filesystem, AFS remained as the name and filesystem root.
163
164 ### <a name="1.02  Who supplies AFS?"></a> 1.02 Who supplies AFS?
165
166             Transarc Corporation          phone: +1 (412) 338-4400
167             The Gulf Tower
168             707 Grant Street              fax:   +1 (412) 338-4404
169             Pittsburgh
170             PA 15219                      email: information@transarc.com
171             United States of America             afs-sales@transarc.com
172
173                                           WWW:    http://www.transarc.com
174
175 ### <a name="1.03  What is /afs?"></a> 1.03 What is /afs?
176
177 The root of the AFS filetree is /afs. If you execute "ls /afs" you will see directories that correspond to AFS cells (see below). These cells may be local (on same LAN) or remote (eg halfway around the world).
178
179 With AFS you can access all the filesystem space under /afs with commands you already use (eg: cd, cp, rm, and so on) provided you have been granted permission (see AFS ACL below).
180
181 ### <a name="1.04  What is an AFS cell?"></a> 1.04 What is an AFS cell?
182
183 An AFS cell is a collection of servers grouped together administratively and presenting a single, cohesive filesystem. Typically, an AFS cell is a set of hosts that use the same Internet domain name.
184
185 Normally, a variation of the domain name is used as the AFS cell name.
186
187 Users log into AFS client workstations which request information and files from the cell's servers on behalf of the users.
188
189 ### <a name="1.05  What are the benefits of u"></a> 1.05 What are the benefits of using AFS?
190
191 The main strengths of AFS are its:
192
193 - caching facility
194 - security features
195 - simplicity of addressing
196 - scalability
197 - communications protocol
198
199 Here are some of the advantages of using AFS in more detail:
200
201 #### <a name="1.05.a  Cache Manager"></a> 1.05.a Cache Manager
202
203 AFS client machines run a Cache Manager process. The Cache Manager maintains information about the identities of the users logged into the machine, finds and requests data on their behalf, and keeps chunks of retrieved files on local disk.
204
205 The effect of this is that as soon as a remote file is accessed a chunk of that file gets copied to local disk and so subsequent accesses (warm reads) are almost as fast as to local disk and considerably faster than a cold read (across the network).
206
207 Local caching also significantly reduces the amount of network traffic, improving performance when a cold read is necessary.
208
209 #### <a name="1.05.b  Location independence"></a> 1.05.b Location independence
210
211 Unlike NFS, which makes use of /etc/filesystems (on a client) to map (mount) between a local directory name and a remote filesystem, AFS does its mapping (filename to location) at the server. This has the tremendous advantage of making the served filespace location independent.
212
213 Location independence means that a user does not need to know which fileserver holds the file, the user only needs to know the pathname of a file. Of course, the user does need to know the name of the AFS cell to which the file belongs. Use of the AFS cellname as the second part of the pathname (eg: /afs/$AFSCELL/somefile) is helpful to distinguish between file namespaces of the local and non-local AFS cells.
214
215 To understand why such location independence is useful, consider having 20 clients and two servers. Let's say you had to move a filesystem "/home" from server a to server b.
216
217 Using NFS, you would have to change the /etc/filesystems file on 20 clients and take "/home" off-line while you moved it between servers.
218
219 With AFS, you simply move the AFS volume(s) which constitute "/home" between the servers. You do this "on-line" while users are actively using files in "/home" with no disruption to their work.
220
221 (Actually, the AFS equivalent of "/home" would be /afs/$AFSCELL/home where $AFSCELL is the AFS cellname.)
222
223 #### <a name="1.05.c  Scalability"></a> 1.05.c Scalability
224
225 With location independence comes scalability. An architectural goal of the AFS designers was client/server ratios of 200:1 which has been successfully exceeded at some sites. Transarc do not recommend customers use the 200:1 ratio. A more cautious value of 50:1 is expected to be practical in most cases. It is certainly possible to work with a ratio somewhere between these two values. Exactly what value depends on many factors including: number of AFS files, size of AFS files, rate at which changes are made, rate at which file are being accessed, speed of servers processor, I/O rates, and network bandwidth.
226
227 AFS cells can range from the small (1 server/client) to the massive (with tens of servers and thousands of clients). Cells can be dynamic: it is simple to add new fileservers or clients and grow the computing resources to meet new user requirements.
228
229 #### <a name="1.05.d  Improved security"></a> 1.05.d Improved security
230
231 Firstly, AFS makes use of Kerberos to authenticate users. This improves security for several reasons:
232
233 - passwords do not pass across the network in plaintext
234
235 - encrypted passwords no longer need to be visible
236   - You don't have to use NIS, aka yellow pages, to distribute /etc/passwd - thus "ypcat passwd" can be eliminated.
237   - If you do choose to use NIS, you can replace the password field with "X" so the encrypted password is not visible. (These issues are discussed in detail in [25]).
238
239 - AFS uses mutual authentication - both the service provider and service requester prove their identities
240
241 Secondly, AFS uses access control lists (ACLs) to enable users to restrict access to their own directories.
242
243 #### <a name="1.05.e  Single systems image (SS"></a> 1.05.e Single systems image (SSI)
244
245 Establishing the same view of filestore from each client and server in a network of systems (that comprise an AFS cell) is an order of magnitude simpler with AFS than it is with, say, NFS.
246
247 This is useful to do because it enables users to move from workstation to workstation and still have the same view of filestore. It also simplifies part of the systems management workload.
248
249 In addition, because AFS works well over wide area networks the SSI is also accessible remotely.
250
251 As an example, consider a company with two widespread divisions (and two AFS cells): ny.acme.com and sf.acme.com. Mr Fudd, based in the New York office, is visiting the San Francisco office.
252
253 Mr. Fudd can then use any AFS client workstation in the San Francisco office that he can log into (a unprivileged guest account would suffice). He could authenticate himself to the ny.acme.com cell and securely access his New York filespace.
254
255 For example:
256
257 The following shows a guest in the sf.acme.com AFS cell:
258
259 1. add AFS executables directory to PATH
260 2. obtaining a PAG with pagsh command (see 2.06)
261 3. use the klog command to authenticate into the ny.acme.com AFS cell
262 4. making a HOME away from home
263 5. invoking a homely .profile
264
265            guest@toontown.sf.acme.com $ PATH=/usr/afsws/bin:$PATH       # {1}
266            guest@toontown.sf.acme.com $ pagsh                           # {2}
267            $ klog -cell ny.acme.com -principal elmer                    # {3}
268            Password:
269            $ HOME=/afs/ny.acme.com/user/elmer; export HOME              # {4}
270            $ cd
271            $ .  .profile                                                # {5}
272            you have new mail
273            guest@toontown $
274
275 It is not necessary for the San Francisco sys admin to give Mr. Fudd an AFS account in the sf.acme.com cell. Mr. Fudd only needs to be able to log into an AFS client that is:
276
277 1. on the same network as his cell and
278 2. his ny.acme.com cell is mounted in the sf.acme.com cell (as would certainly be the case in a company with two cells).
279
280 #### <a name="1.05.f  Replicated AFS volumes"></a> 1.05.f Replicated AFS volumes
281
282 AFS files are stored in structures called Volumes. These volumes reside on the disks of the AFS file server machines. Volumes containing frequently accessed data can be read-only replicated on several servers.
283
284 Cache managers (on users client workstations) will make use of replicate volumes to load balance. If accessing data from one replicate copy, and that copy becomes unavailable due to server or network problems, AFS will automatically start accessing the same data from a different replicate copy.
285
286 An AFS client workstation will access the closest volume copy. By placing replicate volumes on servers closer to clients (eg on same physical LAN) access to those resources is improved and network traffic reduced.
287
288 #### <a name="1.05.g  Improved robustness to s"></a> 1.05.g Improved robustness to server crash
289
290 The Cache Manager maintains local copies of remotely accessed files. This is accomplished in the cache by breaking files into chunks of up to 64k (default chunk size). So, for a large file, there may be several chunks in the cache but a small file will occupy a single chunk (which will be only as big as is needed).
291
292 A "working set" of files that have been accessed on the client is established locally in the client's cache (copied from fileserver(s)).
293
294 If a fileserver crashes, the client's locally cached file copies remain readable but updates to cached files fail while the server is down.
295
296 Also, if the AFS configuration has included replicated read-only volumes then alternate fileservers can satisfy requests for files from those volumes.
297
298 #### <a name="1.05.h  &quot;Easy to use&quot; networking"></a> 1.05.h "Easy to use" networking
299
300 Accessing remote file resources via the network becomes much simpler when using AFS. Users have much less to worry about: want to move a file from a remote site? Just copy it to a different part of /afs.
301
302 Once you have wide-area AFS in place, you don't have to keep local copies of files. Let AFS fetch and cache those files when you need them.
303
304 #### <a name="1.05.i  Communications protocol"></a> 1.05.i Communications protocol
305
306 AFS communications protocol is optimized for Wide Area Networks. Retransmitting only the single bad packet in a batch of packets and allowing the number of unacknowledged packets to be higher (than in other protocols, see [4]).
307
308 #### <a name="1.05.j  Improved system manageme"></a> 1.05.j Improved system management capability
309
310 Systems administrators are able to make configuration changes from any client in the AFS cell (it is not necessary to login to a fileserver).
311
312 With AFS it is simple to effect changes without having to take systems off-line.
313
314 Example:
315
316 A department (with its own AFS cell) was relocated to another office. The cell had several fileservers and many clients. How could they move their systems without causing disruption?
317
318 First, the network infrastructure was established to the new location. The AFS volumes on one fileserver were migrated to the other fileservers. The "freed up" fileserver was moved to the new office and connected to the network.
319
320 A second fileserver was "freed up" by moving its AFS volumes across the network to the first fileserver at the new office. The second fileserver was then moved.
321
322 This process was repeated until all the fileservers were moved.
323
324 All this happened with users on client workstations continuing to use the cell's filespace. Unless a user saw a fileserver being physically moved (s)he would have no way to tell the change had taken place.
325
326 Finally, the AFS clients were moved - this was noticed!
327
328 ### <a name="1.06  Which systems is AFS avail"></a> 1.06 Which systems is AFS available for?
329
330 AFS runs on systems from: HP, Next, DEC, IBM, SUN, and SGI.
331
332 Transarc customers have done ports to Crays, and the 3090, but all are based on some flavour of unix. Some customers have done work to make AFS data available to PCs and Macs, although they are using something similar to the AFS/NFS translator (a system that enables "NFS only" clients to NFS mount the AFS filetree /afs).
333
334 There is a client only implementation "AFS Client for Windows/NT".
335
336 A page describing the current systems for which AFS is supported may be found at:
337
338 - <http://www.transarc.com/Support/afs/relversions/platforms.html>
339
340 There are also ports of AFS done by customers available from Transarc on an "as is" unsupported basis.
341
342 More information on this can be found at:
343
344 - /afs/transarc.com/public/afs-contrib/bin/README
345 - <ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afs-contrib/bin/README>
346
347 These ports of AFS client code include:
348
349 - HP (Apollo) Domain OS - by Jim Rees at the University of Michigan.
350 - sun386i - by Derek Atkins and Chris Provenzano at MIT.
351 - Linux - by Derek Atkins, mailing list: &lt;linux-afs-request@mit.edu&gt; <http://www.mit.edu:8008/menelaus/linux-afs/>
352 - [[NetBSD]] - by John Kohl, mailing list: &lt;netbsd-afs@mit.edu&gt;
353
354 There is some information about AFS on OS/2 at:
355
356 - <http://www.club.cc.cmu.edu/~jgrande/afsos2.html>
357
358 The AFS on Linux FAQ may be found at:
359
360 - <http://www.umlug.umd.edu/linuxafs/>
361
362 ### <a name="1.07  What does &quot;ls /afs&quot; displa"></a> 1.07 What does "ls /afs" display in the Internet AFS filetree?
363
364 Essentially this displays the AFS cells that co-operate in the Internet AFS filetree.
365
366 Note that the output of this will depend on the cell you do it from; a given cell may not have all the publicly advertised cells available, and it may have some cells that aren't advertised outside of the given site.
367
368 The definitive source for this information is:
369
370 - <file:///afs/transarc.com/service/etc/CellServDB.export>
371
372 I've included the list of cell names included in it below:
373
374        asu.edu                 #ASU
375        uni-freiburg.de         #Albert-Ludwigs-Universitat Freiburg
376        anl.gov                 #Argonne National Laboratory
377        fl.mcs.anl.gov          # Argonne National Laboratory MCS Division FL
378        dapnia.saclay.cea.fr    #Axlan-CEA
379        bcc.ac.uk               #Bloomsbury Computing Consortium
380        bu.edu                  #Boston University
381        cs.brown.edu            #Brown University Department of Computer Science
382        caspur.it               #CASPUR Inter-University Computing Consortium,Rome
383        ciesin.org              #CIESIN
384        mathematik-cip.uni-stuttgart.de #CIP-Pool of Math. Dept, Univ. Stuttgart
385        gg.caltech.edu          #Caltech Computer Graphics Group
386        cards.com               #Cards - Electronic Warfare Associates
387        cheme.cmu.edu           #Carnegie Mellon Univ. Chemical Engineering Dept.
388        cmu.edu                 #Carnegie Mellon University
389        andrew.cmu.edu          #Carnegie Mellon University - Campus
390        ce.cmu.edu              #Carnegie Mellon University - Civil Eng. Dept.
391        ece.cmu.edu             #Carnegie Mellon University - Elec. Comp. Eng. Dept.
392        me.cmu.edu              #Carnegie Mellon University - Mechanical Engineering
393        cs.cmu.edu              #Carnegie Mellon University - School of Comp. Sci.
394        club.cc.cmu.edu         #Carnegie Mellon University Computer Club
395        cert.org                #CERT/Coordination Center
396        others.chalmers.se      #Chalmers University of Technology - General users
397        cipool.uni-stuttgart.de #CIP Pool, Rechenzentrum University of Stuttgart
398        clarkson.edu            #Clarkson University, Potsdam, USA
399        msc.cornell.edu         #Cornell University Materials Science Center
400        graphics.cornell.edu    #Cornell University Program of Computer Graphics
401        theory.cornell.edu      #Cornell University Theory Center
402        ifh.de                  #DESY-IfH Zeuthen
403        northstar.dartmouth.edu #Dartmouth College, Project Northstar
404        desy.de                 #Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron
405        dkrz.de                 #Deutsches Klimarechenzentrum Hamburg
406        dis.uniroma1.it         #DIS, Univ. "La Sapienza", Rome, area Buonarotti
407        msrc.pnl.gov            #EMSL's AFS Cell
408        zdvpool.uni-tuebingen.de#Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, WS-Pools
409        enea.it                 #enea.it
410        es.net                  #Energy Sciences Net
411        research.ec.org         #Esprit Research Network of Excellence
412        dce.emsl.pnl.gov        #EMSL's DCE Cell
413        cern.ch                 #European Laboratory for Particle Physics, Geneva
414        fnal.gov                #Fermi National Acclerator Laboratory
415        fh-heilbronn.de         #Fachhochschule Heilbronn
416        hephy.at                #hephy-vienna
417        sleeper.nsa.hp.com      #HP Cupertino
418        palo_alto.hpl.hp.com    #HP Palo Alto
419        afs.hursley.ibm.com     #IBM Hursley Laboratories (UK), external cell
420        ibm.uk                  #IBM UK, AIX Systems Support Centre
421        zurich.ibm.ch           #IBM Zurich Internet Cell
422        ctp.se.ibm.com          #IBM/4C, Chalmers, Sweden
423        ipp-hgw.mpg.de          #IPP site at Greifswald
424        in2p3.fr                #IN2P3 production cell
425        lngs.infn.it            #INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Gran Sasso, Italia
426        le.infn.it              #INFN Sezione di Lecce, Italia
427        pi.infn.it              #INFN Sezione di Pisa
428        ike.uni-stuttgart.de    #Institut fuer Kernenergetik, Universitaet Stuttgart
429        ipp-garching.mpg.de     #Institut fuer Plasmaphysik
430        csv.ica.uni-stuttgart.de #Institut fuer Computeranwendungen, Uni. Stuttgart
431        iastate.edu             #Iowa State University
432        infn.it                 #Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Italia
433        jpl.nasa.gov            #Jet Propulsion Laboratory
434        zdv.uni-mainz.de        #Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz
435        isk.kth.se              #KTH College of Engineering
436        cc.keio.ac.jp           #Keio University, Fac. of Sci. & Tech. Computing Ctr
437        sfc.keio.ac.jp          #Keio University, Japan
438        afs-math.zib-berlin.de  #Konrad-Zuse-Zentrum fuer Informationstechnik Berlin
439        thermo-a.mw.tu-muenchen.de #Lehrstuhl A fuer Thermodynamik,TUM
440        lrz-muenchen.de         #Leibniz-Rechenzentrum Muenchen Germany
441        athena.mit.edu          #MIT/Athena cell
442        net.mit.edu             #MIT/Network Group cell
443        sipb.mit.edu            #MIT/SIPB cell
444        msu.edu                 #Michigan State University home cell
445        mpa-garching.mpg.de     #Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik
446        federation.atd.net      #Multi Resident AFS at Naval Research Lab - CCS
447        isl.ntt.jp              #NTT Information and Communication
448        nersc.gov               #National Energy Research Supercomputer Center
449        alw.nih.gov             #National Institutes of Health
450        nrel.gov                #National Renewable Energy Laboratory
451        cmf.nrl.navy.mil        #Naval Research Lab
452        lcp.nrl.navy.mil        #Naval Research Lab - Lab for Computational Physics
453        nrlfs1.nrl.navy.mil     #Naval Research Laboratory
454        eos.ncsu.edu            #NCSU - College of Engineering
455        unity.ncsu.edu          #NCSU Campus
456        ncat.edu                #North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State U.
457        bp.ncsu.edu             #North Carolina State University - Backbone Prototype
458        ri.osf.org              #OSF Research Institute
459        gr.osf.org              #OSF Research Institute, Grenoble
460        urz.uni-magdeburg.de    #Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Magdeburg
461     N  ovpit.indiana.edu       #OVPIT at Indiana University
462        psc.edu                 #PSC (Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center)
463        psu.edu                 #Penn State
464        phy.bnl.gov             #Physics Deptpartment, Brookhaven National Lab
465        postech.ac.kr           #Pohang University of Science
466        pppl.gov                #Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
467        rwcp.or.jp              #Real World Computer Partnership(rwcp)
468        rz.uni-jena.de          #Rechenzentrum University of Jena, Germany
469        rhrk.uni-kl.de          #Rechenzentrum University of Kaiserslautern
470        rus.uni-stuttgart.de    #Rechenzentrum University of Stuttgart
471        rhic                    #Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider
472        rpi.edu                 #Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
473        uni-bonn.de             #Rheinische Friedrich Wilhelm Univesitaet Bonn
474        rose-hulman.edu         #Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology
475        cs.rose-hulman.edu      # Rose-Hulman Inst. of Tech., CS Department
476        nada.kth.se             #Royal Institute of Technology, NADA
477        rl.ac.uk                #Rutherford Appleton Lab, England
478        slac.stanford.edu       #Stanford Linear Accelerator Center
479        dsg.stanford.edu        #Stanford Univ. - Comp. Sci. - Distributed Systems
480        ir.stanford.edu         #Stanford University
481        afs1.scri.fsu.edu       #Supercomputer Computations Research Instit
482        ethz.ch                 #Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech. - Zurich, Switzerland
483        hrzone.th-darmstadt.de  #TH-Darmstadt
484        tu-bs.de                #Technical University of Braunschweig, Germany
485        tu-chemnitz.de          #Technische Universitaet Chemnitz-Zwickau, Germany
486        telos.com               #Telos Systems Group - Chantilly, Va.
487        transarc.com            #Transarc Corporation
488        cats.ucsc.edu           #UC Santa Cruz, Comp and Tech Services, California
489        umr.edu                 #UMR - Missouri's Technological University
490        hep.net                 #US High Energy Physics Information cell
491        uni-mannheim.de         #Uni Mannheim (Rechenzentrum)
492        ece.ucdavis.edu         #Univ California - Davis campus
493        geo.uni-koeln.de        #Univ. of Cologne Inst. for Geophysics & Meteorology
494        meteo.uni-koeln.de      #Univ. of Cologne Inst. for Geophysics & Meteorology
495     N  dsi.uniroma1.it         #Univ. Rome-1, Dept. of Computer Science
496     U  spv.uniroma1.it         #Univ. Rome-1, Area San Pietro in Vincoli
497     N  vn.uniroma3.it          #Univ. Rome-3, Area Vasca Navale
498        urz.uni-heidelberg.de   #Universitaet Heidelberg
499        spc.uchicago.edu        #University of Chicago - Social Sciences
500        rrz.uni-koeln.de        #University of Cologne -  Reg Comp Center
501        wu-wien.ac.at           #University of Economics, Vienna, Austria
502        uni-hohenheim.de        #University of Hohenheim
503        ncsa.uiuc.edu           #University of Illinois
504        wam.umd.edu             #University of Maryland Network WAM Project
505        glue.umd.edu            #University of Maryland - Project Glue
506        engin.umich.edu         #University of Michigan - CAEN
507        umich.edu               #University of Michigan - Campus
508        dmsv.med.umich.edu      #University of Michigan - DMSV
509        citi.umich.edu          #University of Michigan - IFS Development
510        lsa.umich.edu           #University of Michigan - LSA College
511        math.lsa.umich.edu      #University of Michigan - Math Cell
512        sph.umich.edu           #University of Michigan -- School of Public
513        cs.unc.edu              #University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
514        nd.edu                  #University of Notre Dame
515        pitt.edu                #University of Pittsburgh
516        vn.uniroma3.it          #University of Rome 3, Area Vasca Navale, Italy
517        isi.edu                 #University of Southern California/ISI
518        dce.uni-stuttgart.de    #University of Stuttgart - DCE/DFS Cell
519        ihf.uni-stuttgart.de    #University of Stuttgart, Ins. fuer Hochfrequenz-Tec
520        mathematik.uni-stuttgart.de #University of Stuttgart, Math Dept.
521        cs.utah.edu             #University of Utah Computer Science Dept
522        utah.edu                #University of Utah Information Tech. Service
523        cs.washington.edu       #University of Washington Comp Sci Department
524        wisc.edu                #University of Wisconsin-Madison, Campus
525        cs.wisc.edu             #University of Wisconsin-Madison, Comp Sci Dept
526        belwue.uni-tuebingen.de #ZDV Universitaet Tuebingen
527
528 This shows different and widespread organizations making use of the Internet AFS filetree.
529
530 Note that it is also possible to use AFS "behind the firewall" within the confines of your organization's network - you don't have to participate in the Internet AFS filetree.
531
532 Indeed, there are lots of benefits of using AFS on a local area network without using the WAN capabilities.
533
534 ### <a name="1.08  Why does AFS use Kerberos"></a><a name="1.08  Why does AFS use Kerberos "></a> 1.08 Why does AFS use Kerberos authentication?
535
536 It improves security.
537
538 Kerberos uses the idea of a trusted third party to prove identification. This is a bit like using a letter of introduction or quoting a referee who will vouch for you.
539
540 When a user authenticates using the klog command (s)he is prompted for a password. If the password is accepted the Kerberos Authentication Server (KAS) provides the user with an encrypted token (containing a "ticket granting ticket").
541
542 From that point on, it is the encrypted token that is used to prove the user's identity. These tokens have a limited lifetime (typically a day) and are useless when expired.
543
544 In AFS, it is possible to authenticate into multiple AFS cells. A summary of the current set of tokens held can be displayed by using the "tokens" command.
545
546 For example:
547
548        elmer@toontown $ tokens
549
550        Tokens held by the Cache Manager:
551
552        User's (AFS ID 9997) tokens for afs@ny.acme.com [Expires Sep 15 06:50]
553        User's (AFS ID 5391) tokens for afs@sf.acme.com [Expires Sep 15 06:48]
554           --End of list--
555
556 Kerberos improves security because a users's password need only be entered once (at klog time).
557
558 AFS uses Kerberos to do complex mutual authentication which means that both the service requester and the service provider have to prove their identities before a service is granted.
559
560 Transarc's implementation of Kerberos is slightly different from MIT Kerberos V4 but AFS can work with either version. Joe Jackson wrote about this in: <http://www.cs.cmu.edu/afs/andrew.cmu.edu/usr/shadow/www/afs/afs-with-kerberos.html>
561
562 For more detail on this and other Kerberos issues see the faq for Kerberos (posted to news.answers and comp.protocols.kerberos) [28]. (Also, see [15], [16], [26], [27])
563
564 ### <a name="1.09  Does AFS work over protoco"></a> 1.09 Does AFS work over protocols other than TCP/IP?
565
566 No. AFS was designed to work over TCP/IP.
567
568 ### <a name="1.10  How can I access AFS from"></a><a name="1.10  How can I access AFS from "></a> 1.10 How can I access AFS from my PC?
569
570 You can use PC-Interface which is available from Transarc and Locus Computing Corporations.
571
572 For more information on PC-Interface see the PC-Interface Frequently Asked Questions file in:
573
574 - <file:///afs/transarc.com/public/afs-contrib/doc/faq/pci.faq>
575 - <ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afs-contrib/doc/faq/pci.faq>
576
577 There is also SAMBA (an SMB/netbios server for UNIX). The current version will authenticate the connecting process with AFS as well.
578
579 - <http://samba.anu.edu.au/samba/>
580
581 The SAMBA FAQ is in:
582
583 - <http://samba.anu.edu.au/samba/docs/faq/sambafaq-1.html#ss1.1>
584
585 The SAMBA mailing list can be joined via: <samba-request@anu.edu.au>
586
587 ### <a name="1.11  How does AFS compare with"></a><a name="1.11  How does AFS compare with "></a> 1.11 How does AFS compare with NFS?
588
589 <table border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0">
590   <tr>
591     <td>   </td>
592     <th align="center" bgcolor="#99CCCC"><strong> AFS </strong></th>
593     <th align="center" bgcolor="#99CCCC"><strong> NFS </strong></th>
594   </tr>
595   <tr>
596     <th bgcolor="#99CCCC"><strong> File Access </strong></th>
597     <td> Common name space from all workstations </td>
598     <td> Different file names from different workstations </td>
599   </tr>
600   <tr>
601     <th bgcolor="#99CCCC"><strong> File Location Tracking </strong></th>
602     <td> Automatic tracking by file system processes and databases </td>
603     <td> Mountpoints to files set by administrators and users </td>
604   </tr>
605   <tr>
606     <th bgcolor="#99CCCC"><strong> Performance </strong></th>
607     <td> Client caching to reduce network load; callbacks to maintain cache consistency </td>
608     <td> No local disk caching; limited cache consistency </td>
609   </tr>
610   <tr>
611     <th bgcolor="#99CCCC"><strong> Andrew Benchmark (5 phases, 8 clients) </strong></th>
612     <td> Average time of 210 seconds/client </td>
613     <td> Average time of 280 seconds/client </td>
614   </tr>
615   <tr>
616     <th bgcolor="#99CCCC"><strong> Scaling capabilities </strong></th>
617     <td> Maintains performance in small and very large installations </td>
618     <td> Best in small to mid-size installations </td>
619   </tr>
620   <tr>
621     <td>   </td>
622     <td> Excellent performance on wide-area configuration </td>
623     <td> Best in local-area configurations </td>
624   </tr>
625   <tr>
626     <th bgcolor="#99CCCC"><strong> Security </strong></th>
627     <td> Kerberos mutual authentication </td>
628     <td> Security based on unencrypted user ID's </td>
629   </tr>
630   <tr>
631     <td>   </td>
632     <td> Access control lists on directories for user and group access </td>
633     <td> No access control lists </td>
634   </tr>
635   <tr>
636     <th bgcolor="#99CCCC"><strong> Availability </strong></th>
637     <td> Replicates read-mostly data and AFS system information </td>
638     <td> No replication </td>
639   </tr>
640   <tr>
641     <th bgcolor="#99CCCC"><strong> Backup Operation </strong></th>
642     <td> No system downtime with specially developed AFS Backup System </td>
643     <td> Standard UNIX backup system </td>
644   </tr>
645   <tr>
646     <th bgcolor="#99CCCC"><strong> Reconfiguration </strong></th>
647     <td> By volumes (groups of files) </td>
648     <td> Per-file movement </td>
649   </tr>
650   <tr>
651     <td>   </td>
652     <td> No user impact; files remain accessible during moves, and file names do not change </td>
653     <td> Users lose access to files and filenames change (mountpoints need to be reset) </td>
654   </tr>
655   <tr>
656     <th bgcolor="#99CCCC"><strong> System Management </strong></th>
657     <td> Most tasks performed from any workstation </td>
658     <td> Frequently involves telnet to other workstations </td>
659   </tr>
660   <tr>
661     <th bgcolor="#99CCCC"><strong> Autonomous Architecture </strong></th>
662     <td> Autonomous administrative units called cells, in addition to file servers and clients </td>
663     <td> File servers and clients </td>
664   </tr>
665   <tr>
666     <td>   </td>
667     <td> No trust required between cells </td>
668     <td> No security distinctions between sites </td>
669   </tr>
670   <tr>
671     <td>
672     </td>
673     <td colspan="2"> [ source: <a href="ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/afs-nfs.comparison" target="_top">ftp://ftp.transarc.com/pub/afsps/doc/afs-nfs.comparison</a> ] </td>
674   </tr>
675 </table>