log: Tidy header includes
[openafs.git] / doc / protocol / rx-spec.h
1 /*! \mainpage AFS-3 Programmer's Reference: Specification for the Rx Remote
2  * Procedure Call Facility
3  *
4  * AFS-3 Programmer's Reference:  
5  * 
6  * Specification for the Rx Remote Procedure Call Facility 
7  * \author Edward R. Zayas 
8  * Transarc Corporation 
9  * \version 1.2
10  * \date 28 August 1991 10:11 .cCopyright 1991 Transarc Corporation All Rights
11  * Reserved FS-00-D164 
12  * 
13  *      \page chap1 Chapter 1 -- Overview of the Rx RPC system                                
14  *                                                                                 
15  *      \section sec1-1 Section 1.1: Introduction to Rx                                      
16  * 
17  * \par 
18  * The Rx package provides a high-performance, multi-threaded, and secure
19  * mechanism by which 
20  * remote procedure calls (RPCs) may be performed between programs executing
21  * anywhere in a 
22  * network of computers. The Rx protocol is adaptive, conforming itself to
23  * widely varying 
24  * network communication media. It allows user applications to define and
25  * insert their own 
26  * security modules, allowing them to execute the precise end-to-end
27  * authentication algorithms 
28  * required to suit their needs and goals. Although pervasive throughout the
29  * AFS distributed 
30  * file system, all of its agents, and many of its standard application
31  * programs, Rx is entirely 
32  * separable from AFS and does not depend on any of its features. In fact, Rx
33  * can be used to build applications engaging in RPC-style communication under
34  * a variety of unix-style file systems. There are in-kernel and user-space
35  * implementations of the Rx facility, with both sharing the same interface.
36  * \par 
37  * This document provides a comprehensive and detailed treatment of the Rx RPC
38  * package. 
39  * 
40  *      \section sec1-2 Section 1.2: Basic Concepts 
41  * 
42  * \par 
43  * The Rx design operates on the set of basic concepts described in this
44  * section. 
45  * 
46  *      \subsection sec1-2-1 Section 1.2.1: Security
47  * 
48  * \par 
49  * The Rx architecture provides for tight integration between the RPC mechanism
50  * and methods for making this communication medium secure. As elaborated in
51  * Section 5.3.1.3 and illustrated by the built-in rxkad security system
52  * described in Chapter 3, Rx defines the format for a generic security module,
53  * and then allows application programmers to define and activate
54  * instantiations of these modules. Rx itself knows nothing about the internal
55  * details of any particular security model, or the module-specific state it
56  * requires. It does, however, know when to call the generic security
57  * operations, and so can easily execute the security algorithm defined. Rx
58  * does maintain basic state per connection on behalf of any given security
59  * class. 
60  * 
61  *      \subsection sec1-2-2 Section 1.2.2: Services 
62  * 
63  * \par 
64  * An Rx-based server exports services, or specific RPC interfaces that
65  * accomplish certain tasks. Services are identified by (host-address,
66  * UDP-port, serviceID) triples. An Rx service is installed and initialized on
67  * a given host through the use of the rx NewService() routine (See Section
68  * 5.6.3). Incoming calls are stamped with the Rx service type, and must match
69  * an installed service to be accepted. Internally, Rx services also carry
70  * string names which identify them, which is useful for remote debugging and
71  * statistics-gathering programs. The use of a service ID allows a single
72  * server process to export multiple, independently-specified Rx RPC services. 
73  * \par 
74  * Each Rx service contains one or more security classes, as implemented by
75  * individual security objects. These security objects implement end-to-end
76  * security protocols. Individual peer-to-peer connections established on
77  * behalf of an Rx service will select exactly one of the supported security
78  * objects to define the authentication procedures followed by all calls
79  * associated with the connection. Applications are not limited to using only
80  * the core set of built-in security objects offered by Rx. They are free to
81  * define their own security objects in order to execute the specific protocols
82  * they require. 
83  * \par 
84  * It is possible to specify both the minimum and maximum number of lightweight
85  * processes available to handle simultaneous calls directed to an Rx service.
86  * In addition, certain procedures may be registered with the service and
87  * called at specific times in the course of handling an RPC request. 
88  * 
89  *      \subsection sec1-2-3 Section 1.2.3: Connections 
90  * 
91  * \par 
92  * An Rx connection represents an authenticated communication path, allowing a
93  * sequence of multiple asynchronous conversations (calls). Each connection is
94  * identified by a connection ID. The low-order bits of the connection ID are
95  * reserved so that they may be stamped with the index of a particular call
96  * channel. With up to RX MAXCALLS concurrent calls (set to 4 in this
97  * implementation), the bottom two bits are set aside for this purpose. The
98  * connection ID is not sufficient to uniquely identify an Rx connection by
99  * itself. Should a client crash and restart, it may reuse a connection ID,
100  * causing inconsistent results. Included with the connection ID is the epoch,
101  * or start time for the client side of the connection. After a crash, the next
102  * incarnation of the client will choose a different epoch value. This will
103  * differentiate the new incarnation from the orphaned connection record on the
104  * server side. 
105  * \par 
106  * Each connection is associated with a parent service, which defines a set of
107  * supported security models. At creation time, an Rx connection selects the
108  * particular security protocol it will implement, referencing the associated
109  * service. The connection structure maintains state for each individual call
110  * simultaneously handled. 
111  * 
112  *      \subsection sec1-2-4 Section 1.2.4: Peers 
113  * 
114  * \par 
115  * For each connection, Rx maintains information describing the entity, or
116  * peer, on the other side of the wire. A peer is identified by a (host,
117  * UDP-port) pair, with an IP address used to identify the host. Included in
118  * the information kept on this remote communication endpoint are such network
119  * parameters as the maximum packet size supported by the host, current
120  * readings on round trip time and retransmission delays, and packet skew (see
121  * Section 1.2.7). There are also congestion control fields, including
122  * retransmission statistics and descriptions of the maximum number of packets
123  * that may be sent to the peer without pausing. Peer structures are shared
124  * between connections whenever possible, and, hence, are reference-counted. A
125  * peer object may be garbage-collected if it is not actively referenced by any
126  * connection structure and a sufficient period of time has lapsed since the
127  * reference count dropped to zero. 
128  * 
129  *      \subsection sec1-2-5 Section 1.2.5: Calls 
130  * 
131  * \par 
132  * An Rx call represents an individual RPC being executed on a given
133  * connection. As described above, each connection may have up to RX MAXCALLS
134  * calls active at any one instant. The information contained in each call
135  * structure is specific to the given call. 
136  * \par 
137  * "Permanent" call state, such as the call number, is maintained in the
138  * connection structure itself. 
139  * 
140  *      \subsection sec1-2-6 Section 1.2.6: Quotas 
141  * 
142  * \par 
143  * Each attached server thread must be able to make progress to avoid system
144  * deadlock. The Rx facility ensures that it can always handle the arrival of
145  * the next unacknowledged data packet for an attached call with its system of
146  * packet quotas. A certain number of packets are reserved per server thread
147  * for this purpose, allowing the server threads to queue up an entire window
148  * full of data for an active call and still have packet buffers left over to
149  * be able to read its input without blocking. 
150  * 
151  *      \subsection sec1-2-7 Section 1.2.7: Packet Skew 
152  * 
153  * \par 
154  * If a packet is received n packets later than expected (based on packet
155  * serial numbers), then we define it to have a skew of n. The maximum skew
156  * values allow us to decide when a packet hasn't been received yet because it
157  * is out of order, as opposed to when it is likely to have been dropped. 
158  * 
159  *      \subsection sec1-2-8 Section 1.2.8: Multicasting 
160  * 
161  * \par 
162  * The rx multi.c module provides for multicast abilities, sending an RPC to
163  * several targets simultaneously. While true multicasting is not achieved, it
164  * is simulated by a rapid succession of packet transmissions and a collection
165  * algorithm for the replies. A client program, though, may be programmed as if
166  * multicasting were truly taking place. Thus, Rx is poised to take full
167  * advantage of a system supporting true multicasting with minimal disruption
168  * to the existing client code base. 
169  * 
170  *      \section sec1-3 Section 1.3: Scope 
171  * 
172  * \par 
173  * This paper is a member of a documentation suite providing specifications as
174  * to the operation and interfaces offered by the various AFS servers and
175  * agents. Rx is an integral part of the AFS environment, as it provides the
176  * high-performance, secure pathway by which these system components
177  * communicate across the network. Although AFS is dependent on Rx's services,
178  * the reverse is not true. Rx is a fully independent RPC package, standing on
179  * its own and usable in other environments. 
180  * \par 
181  * The intent of this work is to provide readers with a sufficiently detailed
182  * description of Rx that they may proceed to write their own applications on
183  * top of it. In fact, code for a sample Rx server and client are provided. 
184  * \par 
185  * One topic related to Rx will not be covered by this document, namely the
186  * Rxgen stub generator. Rather, rxgen is addressed in a separate document. 
187  * 
188  *      \section sec1-4 Section 1.4: Document Layout 
189  * 
190  * \par 
191  * After this introduction, Chapter 2 will introduce and describe various
192  * facilities and tools that support Rx. In particular, the threading and
193  * locking packages used by Rx will be examined, along with a set of timer and
194  * preemption tools. Chapter 3 proceeds to examine the details of one of the
195  * built-in security modules offered by Rx. Based on the Kerberos system
196  * developed by MIT's Project Athena, this rxkad module allows secure, ecrypted
197  * communication between the server and client ends of the RPC. Chapter 5 then
198  * provides the full Rx programming interface, and Chapter 6 illustrates the
199  * use of this programming interface by providing a fully-operational
200  * programming example employing Rx. This rxdemo suite is examined in detail,
201  * ranging all the way from a step-by-step analysis of the human-authored
202  * files, and the Rxgen-generated files upon which they are based, to the
203  * workings of the associated Makefile. Output from the example rxdemo server
204  * and client is also provided. 
205  * 
206  *      \section sec1-5 Section 1.5: Related Documents 
207  * 
208  * \par 
209  * Titles for the full suite of AFS specification documents are listed below.
210  * All of the servers and agents making up the AFS computing environment,
211  * whether running in the unix kernel or in user space, utilize an Rx RPC
212  * interface through which they export their services. 
213  * \par
214  * \li  AFS-3 Programmer's Reference: Architectural Overview: This paper
215  * provides an architectual overview of the AFS distributed file system,
216  * describing the full set of servers and agents in a coherent way,
217  * illustrating their relationships to each other and examining their
218  * interactions. 
219  * \li  AFS-3 Programmer's Reference: file Server/Cache Manager Interface: This
220  * document describes the workings and interfaces of the two primary AFS
221  * agents, the file Server and Cache Manager. The file Server provides a
222  * centralized disk repository for sets of files, regulating access to them.
223  * End users sitting on client machines rely on the Cache Manager agent,
224  * running in their kernel, to act as their agent in accessing the data stored
225  * on file Server machines, making those files appear as if they were really
226  * housed locally. 
227  * \li  AFS-3 Programmer's Reference:Volume Server/Volume Location Server
228  * Interface: This document describes the services through which "containers"
229  * of related user data are located and managed. 
230  * \li  AFS-3 Programmer's Reference: Protection Server Interface: This paper
231  * describes the server responsible for mapping printable user names to and
232  * from their internal AFS identifiers. The Protection Server also allows users
233  * to create, destroy, and manipulate "groups" of users, which are suitable for
234  * placement on access control lists (ACLs). 
235  * \li  AFS-3 Programmer's Reference: BOS Server Interface: This paper
236  * explicates the "nanny" service which assists in the administrability of the
237  * AFS environment. 
238  * \par 
239  * In addition to these papers, the AFS 3.1 product is delivered with its own
240  * user, system administrator, installation, and command reference documents. 
241  * 
242  *      \page chap2 Chapter 2 -- The LWP Lightweight Process Package 
243  * 
244  *      \section sec2-1 Section 2.1: Introduction 
245  * \par 
246  * This chapter describes a package allowing multiple threads of control to
247  * coexist and cooperate within one unix process. Each such thread of control
248  * is also referred to as a lightweight process, in contrast to the traditional
249  * unix (heavyweight) process. Except for the limitations of a fixed stack size
250  * and non-preemptive scheduling, these lightweight processes possess all the
251  * properties usually associated with full-fledged processes in typical
252  * operating systems. For the purposes of this document, the terms lightweight
253  * process, LWP, and thread are completely interchangeable, and they appear
254  * intermixed in this chapter. Included in this lightweight process facility
255  * are various sub-packages, including services for locking, I/O control,
256  * timers, fast time determination, and preemption. 
257  * \par 
258  * The Rx facility is not the only client of the LWP package. Other LWP clients
259  * within AFS include the file Server, Protection Server, BOS Server, Volume
260  * Server, Volume Location Server, and the Authentication Server, along with
261  * many of the AFS application programs. 
262  * 
263  *      \section sec2-2 Section 2.2: Description 
264  * 
265  *      \subsection Section 2.2.1: sec2-2-1 LWP Overview 
266  * 
267  * \par 
268  * The LWP package implements primitive functions that provide the basic
269  * facilities required to enable procedures written in C to execute
270  * concurrently and asynchronously. The LWP package is meant to be
271  * general-purpose (note the applications mentioned above), with a heavy
272  * emphasis on simplicity. Interprocess communication facilities can be built
273  * on top of this basic mechanism and in fact, many different IPC mechanisms
274  * could be implemented. 
275  * \par 
276  * In order to set up the threading support environment, a one-time invocation
277  * of the LWP InitializeProcessSupport() function must precede the use of the
278  * facilities described here. This initialization function carves an initial
279  * process out of the currently executing C procedure and returns its thread
280  * ID. For symmetry, an LWP TerminateProcessSupport() function may be used
281  * explicitly to release any storage allocated by its counterpart. If this
282  * function is used, it must be issued from the thread created by the original
283  * LWP InitializeProcessSupport() invocation. 
284  * \par 
285  * When any of the lightweight process functions completes, an integer value is
286  * returned to indicate whether an error condition was encountered. By
287  * convention, a return value of zero indicates that the operation succeeded. 
288  * \par 
289  * Macros, typedefs, and manifest constants for error codes needed by the
290  * threading mechanism are exported by the lwp.h include file. A lightweight
291  * process is identified by an object of type PROCESS, which is defined in the
292  * include file. 
293  * \par 
294  * The process model supported by the LWP operations is based on a
295  * non-preemptive priority dispatching scheme. A priority is an integer in the
296  * range [0..LWP MAX PRIORITY], where 0 is the lowest priority. Once a given
297  * thread is selected and dispatched, it remains in control until it
298  * voluntarily relinquishes its claim on the CPU. Control may be relinquished
299  * by either explicit means (LWP_DispatchProcess()) or implicit means (through
300  * the use of certain other LWP operations with this side effect). In general,
301  * all LWP operations that may cause a higher-priority process to become ready
302  * for dispatching preempt the process requesting the service. When this
303  * occurs, the dispatcher mechanism takes over and automatically schedules the
304  * highest-priority runnable process. Routines in this category, where the
305  * scheduler is guaranteed to be invoked in the absence of errors, are: 
306  * \li LWP_WaitProcess() 
307  * \li LWP_MwaitProcess() 
308  * \li LWP_SignalProcess() 
309  * \li LWP_DispatchProcess() 
310  * \li LWP_DestroyProcess() 
311  * \par 
312  * The following functions are guaranteed not to cause preemption, and so may
313  * be issued with no fear of losing control to another thread: 
314  * \li LWP_InitializeProcessSupport() 
315  * \li LWP_NoYieldSignal() 
316  * \li LWP_CurrentProcess() 
317  * \li LWP_ActiveProcess() 
318  * \li LWP_StackUsed() 
319  * \li LWP_NewRock() 
320  * \li LWP_GetRock() 
321  * \par 
322  * The symbol LWP NORMAL PRIORITY, whose value is (LWP MAX PRIORITY-2),
323  * provides a reasonable default value to use for process priorities. 
324  * \par 
325  * The lwp debug global variable can be set to activate or deactivate debugging
326  * messages tracing the flow of control within the LWP routines. To activate
327  * debugging messages, set lwp debug to a non-zero value. To deactivate, reset
328  * it to zero. All debugging output from the LWP routines is sent to stdout. 
329  * \par 
330  * The LWP package checks for stack overflows at each context switch. The
331  * variable that controls the action of the package when an overflow occurs is
332  * lwp overflowAction. If it is set to LWP SOMESSAGE, then a message will be
333  * printed on stderr announcing the overflow. If lwp overflowAction is set to
334  * LWP SOABORT, the abort() LWP routine will be called. finally, if lwp
335  * overflowAction is set to LWP SOQUIET, the LWP facility will ignore the
336  * errors. By default, the LWP SOABORT setting is used. 
337  * \par 
338  * Here is a sketch of a simple program (using some psuedocode) demonstrating
339  * the high-level use of the LWP facility. The opening #include line brings in
340  * the exported LWP definitions. Following this, a routine is defined to wait
341  * on a "queue" object until something is deposited in it, calling the
342  * scheduler as soon as something arrives. Please note that various LWP
343  * routines are introduced here. Their definitions will appear later, in
344  * Section 2.3.1. 
345  * 
346  * \code
347  * #include <afs/lwp.h> 
348  * static read_process(id) 
349  * int *id; 
350  * {  /* Just relinquish control for now */
351  *      LWP_DispatchProcess(); 
352  *      for     (;;) 
353  *      {  
354  *              /* Wait until there is something in the queue */
355  *              while   (empty(q)) LWP_WaitProcess(q); 
356  *              /* Process the newly-arrived queue entry */
357  *              LWP_DispatchProcess(); 
358  *      } 
359  * } 
360  * \endcode
361  * 
362  * \par
363  * The next routine, write process(), sits in a loop, putting messages on the
364  * shared queue and signalling the reader, which is waiting for activity on the
365  * queue. Signalling a thread is accomplished via the LWP SignalProcess()
366  * library routine. 
367  * 
368  * \code
369  * static write_process() 
370  * { ... 
371  *      /* Loop, writing data to the shared queue.  */
372  *      for     (mesg = messages; *mesg != 0; mesg++) 
373  *      { 
374  *              insert(q, *mesg); 
375  *              LWP_SignalProcess(q); 
376  *      } 
377  * } 
378  * \endcode
379  * 
380  * \par
381  * finally, here is the main routine for this demo pseudocode. It starts by
382  * calling the LWP initialization routine. Next, it creates some number of
383  * reader threads with calls to LWP CreateProcess() in addition to the single
384  * writer thread. When all threads terminate, they will signal the main routine
385  * on the done variable. Once signalled, the main routine will reap all the
386  * threads with the help of the LWP DestroyProcess() function. 
387  * 
388  * \code
389  * main(argc, argv) 
390  * int argc; 
391  * char **argv; 
392  * { 
393  *      PROCESS *id;  /* Initial thread ID */
394  *      /* Set up the LWP package, create the initial thread ID. */
395  *      LWP_InitializeProcessSupport(0, &id); 
396  *      /* Create a set of reader threads.  */
397  *      for (i = 0; i < nreaders; i++) 
398  *              LWP_CreateProcess(read_process, STACK_SIZE, 0, i, "Reader",
399  *              &readers[i]); 
400  * 
401  *      /* Create a single writer thread.  */
402  *      LWP_CreateProcess(write_process, STACK_SIZE, 1, 0, "Writer", &writer); 
403  *      /* Wait for all the above threads to terminate.  */
404  *      for (i = 0; i <= nreaders; i++) 
405  *              LWP_WaitProcess(&done); 
406  * 
407  *      /* All threads are done. Destroy them all.  */
408  *      for (i = nreaders-1; i >= 0; i--) 
409  *              LWP_DestroyProcess(readers[i]); 
410  * } 
411  * \endcode
412  * 
413  *      \subsection sec2-2-2 Section 2.2.2: Locking 
414  * \par
415  * The LWP locking facility exports a number of routines and macros that allow
416  * a C programmer using LWP threading to place read and write locks on shared
417  * data structures.  This locking facility was also written with simplicity in
418  * mind. 
419  * \par
420  * In order to invoke the locking mechanism, an object of type struct Lock must
421  * be associated with the object. After being initialized with a call to
422  * LockInit(), the lock object is used in invocations of various macros,
423  * including ObtainReadLock(), ObtainWriteLock(), ReleaseReadLock(),
424  * ReleaseWriteLock(), ObtainSharedLock(), ReleaseSharedLock(), and
425  * BoostSharedLock(). 
426  * \par
427  * Lock semantics specify that any number of readers may hold a lock in the
428  * absence of a writer. Only a single writer may acquire a lock at any given
429  * time. The lock package guarantees fairness, legislating that each reader and
430  * writer will eventually obtain a given lock. However, this fairness is only
431  * guaranteed if the priorities of the competing processes are identical. Note
432  * that ordering is not guaranteed by this package. 
433  * \par
434  * Shared locks are read locks that can be "boosted" into write locks. These
435  * shared locks have an unusual locking matrix. Unboosted shared locks are
436  * compatible with read locks, yet incompatible with write locks and other
437  * shared locks. In essence, a thread holding a shared lock on an object has
438  * effectively read-locked it, and has the option to promote it to a write lock
439  * without allowing any other writer to enter the critical region during the
440  * boost operation itself. 
441  * \par
442  * It is illegal for a process to request a particular lock more than once
443  * without first releasing it. Failure to obey this restriction will cause
444  * deadlock. This restriction is not enforced by the LWP code. 
445  * \par
446  * Here is a simple pseudocode fragment serving as an example of the available
447  * locking operations. It defines a struct Vnode object, which contains a lock
448  * object. The get vnode() routine will look up a struct Vnode object by name,
449  * and then either read-lock or write-lock it. 
450  * \par
451  * As with the high-level LWP example above, the locking routines introduced
452  * here will be fully defined later, in Section 2.3.2. 
453  * 
454  * \code
455  * #include <afs/lock.h> 
456  * 
457  * struct Vnode { 
458  *      ... 
459  *      struct Lock lock;  Used to lock this vnode  
460  * ... }; 
461  * 
462  * #define READ 0 
463  * #define WRITE 1 
464  * 
465  * struct Vnode *get_vnode(name, how) char *name; 
466  * int how; 
467  * { 
468  *      struct Vnode *v; 
469  *      v = lookup(name); 
470  *      if (how == READ) 
471  *              ObtainReadLock(&v->lock); 
472  *      else 
473  *              ObtainWriteLock(&v->lock); 
474  * } 
475  * \endcode
476  * 
477  * 
478  *      \subsection sec2-2-3 Section 2.2.3: IOMGR 
479  * 
480  * \par
481  * The IOMGR facility associated with the LWP service allows threads to wait on
482  * various unix events. The exported IOMGR Select() routine allows a thread to
483  * wait on the same set of events as the unix select() call. The parameters to
484  * these two routines are identical. IOMGR Select() puts the calling LWP to
485  * sleep until no threads are active. At this point, the built-in IOMGR thread,
486  * which runs at the lowest priority, wakes up and coalesces all of the select
487  * requests together. It then performs a single select() and wakes up all
488  * threads affected by the result. 
489  * \par
490  * The IOMGR Signal() routine allows an LWP to wait on the delivery of a unix
491  * signal. The IOMGR thread installs a signal handler to catch all deliveries
492  * of the unix signal. This signal handler posts information about the signal
493  * delivery to a global data structure. The next time that the IOMGR thread
494  * runs, it delivers the signal to any waiting LWP. 
495  * \par
496  * Here is a pseudocode example of the use of the IOMGR facility, providing the
497  * blueprint for an implemention a thread-level socket listener. 
498  * 
499  * \code
500  * void rpc_SocketListener() 
501  * { 
502  *      int ReadfdMask, WritefdMask, ExceptfdMask, rc; 
503  *      struct timeval *tvp; 
504  *      while(TRUE) 
505  *      { ... 
506  *              ExceptfdMask = ReadfdMask = (1 << rpc_RequestSocket); 
507  *              WritefdMask = 0; 
508  * 
509  *              rc = IOMGR_Select(8*sizeof(int), &ReadfdMask, &WritefdMask,
510  *              &ExceptfdMask, tvp); 
511  * 
512  *              switch(rc) 
513  *              { 
514  *                      case 0: /* Timeout */ continue; 
515  *                      /* Main while loop */
516  * 
517  *                      case -1: /* Error */ 
518  *                      SystemError("IOMGR_Select"); 
519  *                      exit(-1); 
520  * 
521  *                      case 1: /* RPC packet arrived! */ ... 
522  *                      process packet ... 
523  *                      break; 
524  * 
525  *                      default: Should never occur 
526  *              } 
527  *      } 
528  * } 
529  * \endcode
530  * 
531  *      \subsection sec2-2-4 Section 2.2.4: Timer 
532  * \par
533  * The timer package exports a number of routines that assist in manipulating
534  * lists of objects of type struct TM Elem. These struct TM Elem timers are
535  * assigned a timeout value by the user and inserted in a package-maintained
536  * list. The time remaining to each timer's timeout is kept up to date by the
537  * package under user control. There are routines to remove a timer from its
538  * list, to return an expired timer from a list, and to return the next timer
539  * to expire. 
540  * \par
541  * A timer is commonly used by inserting a field of type struct TM Elem into a
542  * structure. After setting the desired timeout value, the structure is
543  * inserted into a list by means of its timer field. 
544  * \par
545  * Here is a simple pseudocode example of how the timer package may be used.
546  * After calling the package initialization function, TM Init(), the pseudocode
547  * spins in a loop. first, it updates all the timers via TM Rescan() calls.
548  * Then, it pulls out the first expired timer object with TM GetExpired() (if
549  * any), and processes it. 
550  * 
551  * \code
552  * static struct TM_Elem *requests; 
553  * ... 
554  * TM_Init(&requests); /* Initialize timer list */ ... 
555  * for (;;) { 
556  *      TM_Rescan(requests);  /* Update the timers */
557  *      expired = TM_GetExpired(requests); 
558  *      if (expired == 0) 
559  *      break; 
560  *      . . . process expired element . . . 
561  *      } 
562  * \endcode
563  * 
564  *      \subsection sec2-2-5 Section 2.2.5: Fast Time 
565  * 
566  * \par
567  * The fast time routines allows a caller to determine the current time of day
568  * without incurring the expense of a kernel call. It works by mapping the page
569  * of the kernel that holds the time-of-day variable and examining it directly.
570  * Currently, this package only works on Suns. The routines may be called on
571  * other architectures, but they will run more slowly. 
572  * \par
573  * The initialization routine for this package is fairly expensive, since it
574  * does a lookup of a kernel symbol via nlist(). If the client application
575  * program only runs for only a short time, it may wish to call FT Init() with
576  * the notReally parameter set to TRUE in order to prevent the lookup from
577  * taking place. This is useful if you are using another package that uses the
578  * fast time facility. 
579  * 
580  *      \subsection sec2-2-6 Section 2.2.6: Preemption 
581  * 
582  * \par
583  * The preemption package provides a mechanism by which control can pass
584  * between lightweight processes without the need for explicit calls to LWP
585  * DispatchProcess(). This effect is achieved by periodically interrupting the
586  * normal flow of control to check if other (higher priority) procesess are
587  * ready to run. 
588  * \par
589  * The package makes use of the BSD interval timer facilities, and so will
590  * cause programs that make their own use of these facilities to malfunction.
591  * In particular, use of alarm(3) or explicit handling of SIGALRM is
592  * disallowed. Also, calls to sleep(3) may return prematurely. 
593  * \par
594  * Care should be taken that routines are re-entrant where necessary. In
595  * particular, note that stdio(3) is not re-entrant in general, and hence
596  * multiple threads performing I/O on the same fiLE structure may function
597  * incorrectly. 
598  * \par
599  * An example pseudocode routine illustrating the use of this preemption
600  * facility appears below. 
601  * 
602  * \code
603  * #include <sys/time.h> 
604  * #include "preempt.h" 
605  *      ...  struct timeval tv; 
606  *      LWP_InitializeProcessSupport( ... ); 
607  *      tv.tv_sec = 10; 
608  *      tv.tv_usec = 0; 
609  *      PRE_InitPreempt(&tv); 
610  *      PRE_PreemptMe(); ... 
611  *      PRE_BeginCritical(); ... 
612  *      PRE_EndCritical(); ... 
613  *      PRE_EndPreempt(); 
614  * \endcode
615  * 
616  *      \section sec2-3 Section 2.3: Interface Specifications 
617  * 
618  *      \subsection sec2-3-1 Section 2.3.1: LWP 
619  * 
620  * \par
621  * This section covers the calling interfaces to the LWP package. Please note
622  * that LWP macros (e.g., ActiveProcess) are also included here, rather than
623  * being relegated to a different section. 
624  * 
625  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-1-1 Section 2.3.1.1: LWP_InitializeProcessSupport
626  *      _ Initialize the LWP package 
627  * 
628  * \par
629  * int LWP_InitializeProcessSupport(IN int priority; OUT PROCESS *pid) 
630  * \par Description 
631  * This function initializes the LWP package. In addition, it turns the current
632  * thread of control into the initial process with the specified priority. The
633  * process ID of this initial thread is returned in the pid parameter. This
634  * routine must be called before any other routine in the LWP library. The
635  * scheduler will NOT be invoked as a result of calling
636  * LWP_InitializeProcessSupport(). 
637  * \par Error Codes 
638  * LWP EBADPRI The given priority is invalid, either negative or too large. 
639  * 
640  *       \subsubsection sec2-3-1-2 Section 2.3.1.2: LWP_TerminateProcessSupport
641  *       _ End process support, perform cleanup 
642  * 
643  * \par
644  * int LWP_TerminateProcessSupport() 
645  * \par Description 
646  * This routine terminates the LWP threading support and cleans up after it by
647  * freeing any auxiliary storage used. This routine must be called from within
648  * the process that invoked LWP InitializeProcessSupport(). After LWP
649  * TerminateProcessSupport() has been called, it is acceptable to call LWP
650  * InitializeProcessSupport() again in order to restart LWP process support. 
651  * \par Error Codes 
652  * ---Always succeeds, or performs an abort(). 
653  * 
654  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-1-3 Section 2.3.1.3: LWP_CreateProcess _ Create a
655  *      new thread 
656  * 
657  * \par
658  * int LWP_CreateProcess(IN int (*ep)(); IN int stacksize; IN int priority; IN
659  * char *parm; IN char *name; OUT PROCESS *pid) 
660  * \par Description 
661  * This function is used to create a new lightweight process with a given
662  * printable name. The ep argument identifies the function to be used as the
663  * body of the thread. The argument to be passed to this function is contained
664  * in parm. The new thread's stack size in bytes is specified in stacksize, and
665  * its execution priority in priority. The pid parameter is used to return the
666  * process ID of the new thread. 
667  * \par
668  * If the thread is successfully created, it will be marked as runnable. The
669  * scheduler is called before the LWP CreateProcess() call completes, so the
670  * new thread may indeed begin its execution before the completion. Note that
671  * the new thread is guaranteed NOT to run before the call completes if the
672  * specified priority is lower than the caller's. On the other hand, if the new
673  * thread's priority is higher than the caller's, then it is guaranteed to run
674  * before the creation call completes. 
675  * \par Error Codes 
676  * LWP EBADPRI The given priority is invalid, either negative or too large. 
677  * \n LWP NOMEM Could not allocate memory to satisfy the creation request. 
678  * 
679  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-1-4 Section: 2.3.1.4: LWP_DestroyProcess _ Create
680  *      a new thread 
681  * 
682  * \par
683  * int LWP_DestroyProcess(IN PROCESS pid) 
684  * \par Description 
685  * This routine destroys the thread identified by pid. It will be terminated
686  * immediately, and its internal storage will be reclaimed. A thread is allowed
687  * to destroy itself. In this case, of course, it will only get to see the
688  * return code if the operation fails. Note that a thread may also destroy
689  * itself by returning from the parent C routine. 
690  * \par
691  * The scheduler is called by this operation, which may cause an arbitrary
692  * number of threads to execute before the caller regains the processor. 
693  * \par Error Codes 
694  * LWP EINIT The LWP package has not been initialized. 
695  * 
696  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-1-5 Section 2.3.1.5: WaitProcess _ Wait on an
697  *      event 
698  * 
699  * \par
700  * int LWP WaitProcess(IN char *event) 
701  * \par Description 
702  * This routine puts the thread making the call to sleep until another LWP
703  * calls the LWP SignalProcess() or LWP NoYieldSignal() routine with the
704  * specified event. Note that signalled events are not queued. If a signal
705  * occurs and no thread is awakened, the signal is lost. The scheduler is
706  * invoked by the LWP WaitProcess() routine. 
707  * \par Error Codes 
708  * LWP EINIT The LWP package has not been initialized. 
709  * \n LWP EBADEVENT The given event pointer is null. 
710  * 
711  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-1-6 Section 2.3.1.6: MwaitProcess _ Wait on a set
712  *      of events 
713  * 
714  * \par
715  * int LWP MwaitProcess(IN int wcount; IN char *evlist[]) 
716  * \par Description 
717  * This function allows a thread to wait for wcount signals on any of the items
718  * in the given evlist. Any number of signals of a particular event are only
719  * counted once. The evlist is a null-terminated list of events to wait for.
720  * The scheduler will be invoked. 
721  * \par Error Codes 
722  * LWP EINIT The LWP package has not been initialized. 
723  * \n LWP EBADCOUNT An illegal number of events has been supplied. 
724  * 
725  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-1-7 Section 2.3.1.7: SignalProcess _ Signal an
726  *      event 
727  * 
728  * \par
729  * int LWP SignalProcess(IN char *event) 
730  * \par Description 
731  * This routine causes the given event to be signalled. All threads waiting for
732  * this event (exclusively) will be marked as runnable, and the scheduler will
733  * be invoked. Note that threads waiting on multiple events via LWP
734  * MwaitProcess() may not be marked as runnable. Signals are not queued.
735  * Therefore, if no thread is waiting for the signalled event, the signal will
736  * be lost. 
737  * \par Error Codes 
738  * LWP EINIT The LWP package has not been initialized. LWP EBADEVENT A null
739  * event pointer has been provided. LWP ENOWAIT No thread was waiting on the
740  * given event. 
741  * 
742  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-1-8 Section 2.3.1.8: NoYieldSignal _ Signal an
743  *      event without invoking scheduler 
744  * 
745  * \par
746  * int LWP NoYieldSignal(IN char *event) 
747  * \par Description 
748  * This function is identical to LWP SignalProcess() except that the scheduler
749  * will not be invoked. Thus, control will remain with the signalling process. 
750  * \par Error Codes 
751  * LWP EINIT The LWP package has not been initialized. LWP EBADEVENT A null
752  * event pointer has been provided. LWP ENOWAIT No thread was waiting on the
753  * given event. 
754  * 
755  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-1-9 Section 2.3.1.9: DispatchProcess _ Yield
756  *      control to the scheduler 
757  * 
758  * \par
759  * int LWP DispatchProcess() 
760  * \par Description 
761  * This routine causes the calling thread to yield voluntarily to the LWP
762  * scheduler. If no other thread of appropriate priority is marked as runnable,
763  * the caller will continue its execution. 
764  * \par Error Codes 
765  * LWP EINIT The LWP package has not been initialized. 
766  * 
767  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-1-10 Section 2.3.1.10: CurrentProcess _ Get the
768  *      current thread's ID 
769  * 
770  * \par
771  * int LWP CurrentProcess(IN PROCESS *pid) 
772  * \par Description 
773  * This call places the current lightweight process ID in the pid parameter. 
774  * \par Error Codes 
775  * LWP EINIT The LWP package has not been initialized. 
776  * 
777  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-1-11 Section 2.3.1.11: ActiveProcess _ Get the
778  *      current thread's ID (macro) 
779  * 
780  * \par
781  * int LWP ActiveProcess() 
782  * \par Description 
783  * This macro's value is the current lightweight process ID. It generates a
784  * value identical to that acquired by calling the LWP CurrentProcess()
785  * function described above if the LWP package has been initialized. If no such
786  * initialization has been done, it will return a value of zero. 
787  * 
788  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-1-12 Section: 2.3.1.12: StackUsed _ Calculate
789  *      stack usage 
790  * 
791  * \par
792  * int LWP StackUsed(IN PROCESS pid; OUT int *max; OUT int *used) 
793  * \par Description 
794  * This function returns the amount of stack space allocated to the thread
795  * whose identifier is pid, and the amount actually used so far. This is
796  * possible if the global variable lwp stackUseEnabled was TRUE when the thread
797  * was created (it is set this way by default). If so, the thread's stack area
798  * was initialized with a special pattern. The memory still stamped with this
799  * pattern can be determined, and thus the amount of stack used can be
800  * calculated. The max parameter is always set to the thread's stack allocation
801  * value, and used is set to the computed stack usage if lwp stackUseEnabled
802  * was set when the process was created, or else zero. 
803  * \par Error Codes 
804  * LWP NO STACK Stack usage was not enabled at thread creation time. 
805  * 
806  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-1-13 Section 2.3.1.13: NewRock _ Establish
807  *      thread-specific storage 
808  * 
809  * \par
810  * int LWP NewRock (IN int tag; IN char **value)
811  * \par Description
812  * This function establishes a "rock", or thread-specific information,
813  * associating it with the calling LWP. The tag is intended to be any unique
814  * integer value, and the value is a pointer to a character array containing
815  * the given data. 
816  * \par
817  * Users of the LWP package must coordinate their choice of tag values. Note
818  * that a tag's value cannot be changed. Thus, to obtain a mutable data
819  * structure, another level of indirection is required. Up to MAXROCKS (4)
820  * rocks may be associated with any given thread. 
821  * \par Error Codes
822  * ENOROCKS A rock with the given tag field already exists. All of the MAXROCKS
823  * are in use. 
824  * 
825  * 
826  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-1-14 Section: 2.3.1.14: GetRock _ Retrieve
827  *      thread-specific storage 
828  * 
829  * \par
830  * int LWP GetRock(IN int tag; OUT **value) 
831  * \par Description 
832  * This routine recovers the thread-specific information associated with the
833  * calling process and the given tag, if any. Such a rock had to be established
834  * through a LWP NewRock() call. The rock's value is deposited into value. 
835  * \par Error Codes 
836  * LWP EBADROCK A rock has not been associated with the given tag for this
837  * thread. 
838  * 
839  *      \subsection sec2-3-2 Section 2.3.2: Locking 
840  * 
841  * \par
842  * This section covers the calling interfaces to the locking package. Many of
843  * the user-callable routines are actually implemented as macros. 
844  * 
845  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-2-1 Section 2.3.2.1: Lock Init _ Initialize lock
846  *      structure 
847  * 
848  * \par
849  * void Lock Init(IN struct Lock *lock) 
850  * \par Description 
851  * This function must be called on the given lock object before any other
852  * operations can be performed on it. 
853  * \par Error Codes 
854  * ---No value is returned. 
855  * 
856  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-2-2 Section 2.3.2.2: ObtainReadLock _ Acquire a
857  *      read lock 
858  * 
859  * \par
860  * void ObtainReadLock(IN struct Lock *lock) 
861  * \par Description 
862  * This macro obtains a read lock on the specified lock object. Since this is a
863  * macro and not a function call, results are not predictable if the value of
864  * the lock parameter is a side-effect producing expression, as it will be
865  * evaluated multiple times in the course of the macro interpretation. 
866  * Read locks are incompatible with write, shared, and boosted shared locks. 
867  * \par Error Codes 
868  * ---No value is returned. 
869  * 
870  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-2-3 Section 2.3.2.3: ObtainWriteLock _ Acquire a
871  *      write lock 
872  * 
873  * \par
874  * void ObtainWriteLock(IN struct Lock *lock) 
875  * \par Description 
876  * This macro obtains a write lock on the specified lock object. Since this is
877  * a macro and not a function call, results are not predictable if the value of
878  * the lock parameter is a side-effect producing expression, as it will be
879  * evaluated multiple times in the course of the macro interpretation. 
880  * \par
881  * Write locks are incompatible with all other locks. 
882  * \par Error Codes 
883  * ---No value is returned. 
884  * 
885  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-2-4 Section 2.3.2.4: ObtainSharedLock _ Acquire a
886  *      shared lock 
887  * 
888  * \par
889  * void ObtainSharedLock(IN struct Lock *lock) 
890  * \par Description 
891  * This macro obtains a shared lock on the specified lock object. Since this is
892  * a macro and not a function call, results are not predictable if the value of
893  * the lock parameter is a side-effect producing expression, as it will be
894  * evaluated multiple times in the course of the macro interpretation. 
895  * \par
896  * Shared locks are incompatible with write and boosted shared locks, but are
897  * compatible with read locks. 
898  * \par Error Codes 
899  * ---No value is returned. 
900  * 
901  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-2-5 Section 2.3.2.5: ReleaseReadLock _ Release
902  *      read lock 
903  * 
904  * \par
905  * void ReleaseReadLock(IN struct Lock *lock) 
906  * \par Description 
907  * This macro releases the specified lock. The lock must have been previously
908  * read-locked. Since this is a macro and not a function call, results are not
909  * predictable if the value of the lock parameter is a side-effect producing
910  * expression, as it will be evaluated multiple times in the course of the
911  * macro interpretation. The results are also unpredictable if the lock was not
912  * previously read-locked by the thread calling ReleaseReadLock(). 
913  * \par Error Codes 
914  * ---No value is returned. 
915  * 
916  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-2-6 Section 2.3.2.6: ReleaseWriteLock _ Release
917  *      write lock 
918  * 
919  * \par
920  * void ReleaseWriteLock(IN struct Lock *lock) 
921  * \par Description 
922  * This macro releases the specified lock. The lock must have been previously
923  * write-locked. Since this is a macro and not a function call, results are not
924  * predictable if the value of the lock parameter is a side-effect producing
925  * expression, as it will be evaluated multiple times in the course of the
926  * macro interpretation. The results are also unpredictable if the lock was not
927  * previously write-locked by the thread calling ReleaseWriteLock(). 
928  * \par Error Codes 
929  * ---No value is returned. 
930  * 
931  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-2-7 Section 2.3.2.7: ReleaseSharedLock _ Release
932  *      shared lock 
933  * 
934  * \par
935  * void ReleaseSharedLock(IN struct Lock *lock) 
936  * \par Description 
937  * This macro releases the specified lock. The lock must have been previously
938  * share-locked. Since this is a macro and not a function call, results are not
939  * predictalbe if the value of the lock parameter is a side-effect producing
940  * expression, as it will be evaluated multiple times in the course of the
941  * macro interpretation. The results are also unpredictable if the lock was not
942  * previously share-locked by the thread calling ReleaseSharedLock(). 
943  * \par Error Codes 
944  * ---No value is returned. 
945  * 
946  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-2-8 Section 2.3.2.8: CheckLock _ Determine state
947  *      of a lock 
948  * 
949  * \par
950  * void CheckLock(IN struct Lock *lock) 
951  * \par Description 
952  * This macro produces an integer that specifies the status of the indicated
953  * lock. The value will be -1 if the lock is write-locked, 0 if unlocked, or
954  * otherwise a positive integer that indicates the number of readers (threads
955  * holding read locks). Since this is a macro and not a function call, results
956  * are not predictable if the value of the lock parameter is a side-effect
957  * producing expression, as it will be evaluated multiple times in the course
958  * of the macro interpretation. 
959  * \par Error Codes 
960  * ---No value is returned. 
961  * 
962  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-2-9 Section 2.3.2.9: BoostLock _ Boost a shared
963  *      lock 
964  * 
965  * \par
966  * void BoostLock(IN struct Lock *lock) 
967  * \par Description 
968  * This macro promotes ("boosts") a shared lock into a write lock. Such a boost
969  * operation guarantees that no other writer can get into the critical section
970  * in the process. Since this is a macro and not a function call, results are
971  * not predictable if the value of the lock parameter is a side-effect
972  * producing expression, as it will be evaluated multiple times in the course
973  * of the macro interpretation. 
974  * \par Error Codes 
975  * ---No value is returned. 
976  * 
977  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-2-10 Section 2.3.2.10: UnboostLock _ Unboost a
978  *      shared lock 
979  * 
980  * \par
981  * void UnboostLock(IN struct Lock *lock) 
982  * \par Description 
983  * This macro demotes a boosted shared lock back down into a regular shared
984  * lock. Such an unboost operation guarantees that no other writer can get into
985  * the critical section in the process. Since this is a macro and not a
986  * function call, results are not predictable if the value of the lock
987  * parameter is a side-effect producing expression, as it will be evaluated
988  * multiple times in the course of the macro interpretation. 
989  * \par Error Codes 
990  * ---No value is returned. 
991  * 
992  *      \subsection sec2-3-3 Section 2.3.3: IOMGR 
993  * 
994  * \par
995  * This section covers the calling interfaces to the I/O management package. 
996  * 
997  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-3-1 Section: 2.3.3.1: IOMGR Initialize _
998  *      Initialize the package 
999  * 
1000  * \par
1001  * int IOMGR Initialize() 
1002  * \par Description 
1003  * This function initializes the IOMGR package. Its main task is to create the
1004  * IOMGR thread itself, which runs at the lowest possible priority (0). The
1005  * remainder of the lightweight processes must be running at priority 1 or
1006  * greater (up to a maximum of LWP MAX PRIORITY (4)) for the IOMGR package to
1007  * function correctly. 
1008  * \par Error Codes 
1009  * -1 The LWP and/or timer package haven't been initialized. 
1010  * \n <misc> Any errors that may be returned by the LWP CreateProcess()
1011  * routine. 
1012  * 
1013  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-3-2 Section 2.3.3.2: IOMGR finalize _ Clean up
1014  *      the IOMGR facility 
1015  * 
1016  * \par
1017  * int IOMGR finalize() 
1018  * \par Description 
1019  * This routine cleans up after the IOMGR package when it is no longer needed.
1020  * It releases all storage and destroys the IOMGR thread itself. 
1021  * \par Error Codes 
1022  * <misc> Any errors that may be returned by the LWP DestroyProcess() routine. 
1023  * 
1024  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-3-3 Section 2.3.3.3: IOMGR Select _ Perform a
1025  *      thread-level select() 
1026  * 
1027  * \par
1028  * int IOMGR Select (IN int numfds; IN int *rfds; IN int *wfds; IN int *xfds;
1029  * IN truct timeval *timeout) 
1030  * \par Description 
1031  * This routine performs an LWP version of unix select() operation. The
1032  * parameters have the same meanings as with the unix call. However, the return
1033  * values will be simplified (see below). If this is a polling select (i.e.,
1034  * the value of timeout is null), it is done and the IOMGR Select() function
1035  * returns to the user with the results. Otherwise, the calling thread is put
1036  * to sleep. If at some point the IOMGR thread is the only runnable process, it
1037  * will awaken and collect all select requests. The IOMGR will then perform a
1038  * single select and awaken the appropriate processes. This will force a return
1039  * from the affected IOMGR Select() calls. 
1040  * \par Error Codes 
1041  * -1 An error occurred.
1042  * \n 0 A timeout occurred.
1043  * \n 1 Some number of file descriptors are ready. 
1044  * 
1045  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-3-4 Section 2.3.3.4: IOMGR Signal _ Associate
1046  *      unix and LWP signals 
1047  * 
1048  * \par
1049  * int IOMGR Signal(IN int signo; IN char *event) 
1050  * \par Description 
1051  * This function associates an LWP signal with a unix signal. After this call,
1052  * when the given unix signal signo is delivered to the (heavyweight unix)
1053  * process, the IOMGR thread will deliver an LWP signal to the event via LWP
1054  * NoYieldSignal(). This wakes up any lightweight processes waiting on the
1055  * event. Multiple deliveries of the signal may be coalesced into one LWP
1056  * wakeup. The call to LWP NoYieldSignal() will happen synchronously. It is
1057  * safe for an LWP to check for some condition and then go to sleep waiting for
1058  * a unix signal without having to worry about delivery of the signal happening
1059  * between the check and the call to LWP WaitProcess(). 
1060  * \par Error Codes 
1061  * LWP EBADSIG The signo value is out of range. 
1062  * \n LWP EBADEVENT The event pointer is null. 
1063  * 
1064  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-3-5 Section 2.3.3.5: IOMGR CancelSignal _ Cancel
1065  *      unix and LWP signal association 
1066  * 
1067  * \par
1068  * int IOMGR CancelSignal(IN int signo) 
1069  * \par Description 
1070  * This routine cancels the association between a unix signal and an LWP event.
1071  * After calling this function, the unix signal signo will be handled however
1072  * it was handled before the corresponding call to IOMGR Signal(). 
1073  * \par Error Codes 
1074  * LWP EBADSIG The signo value is out of range. 
1075  * 
1076  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-3-6 Section 2.3.3.6: IOMGR Sleep _ Sleep for a
1077  *      given period 
1078  * 
1079  * \par
1080  * void IOMGR Sleep(IN unsigned seconds) 
1081  * \par Description 
1082  * This function calls IOMGR Select() with zero file descriptors and a timeout
1083  * structure set up to cause the thread to sleep for the given number of
1084  * seconds. 
1085  * \par Error Codes 
1086  * ---No value is returned. 
1087  * 
1088  *      \subsection sec2-3-4 Section 2.3.4: Timer 
1089  * 
1090  * \par
1091  * This section covers the calling interface to the timer package associated
1092  * with the LWP facility. 
1093  * 
1094  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-4-1 Section 2.3.4.1: TM Init _ Initialize a timer
1095  *      list 
1096  * 
1097  * \par
1098  * int TM Init(IN struct TM Elem **list) 
1099  * \par Description 
1100  * This function causes the specified timer list to be initialized. TM Init()
1101  * must be called before any other timer operations are applied to the list. 
1102  * \par Error Codes 
1103  * -1 A null timer list could not be produced. 
1104  * 
1105  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-4-2 Section 2.3.4.2: TM final _ Clean up a timer
1106  *      list 
1107  * 
1108  * \par
1109  * int TM final(IN struct TM Elem **list) 
1110  * \par Description 
1111  * This routine is called when the given empty timer list is no longer needed.
1112  * All storage associated with the list is released. 
1113  * \par Error Codes 
1114  * -1 The list parameter is invalid. 
1115  * 
1116  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-4-3 Section 2.3.4.3: TM Insert _ Insert an object
1117  *      into a timer list
1118  * 
1119  * \par
1120  * void TM Insert(IN struct TM Elem **list; IN struct TM Elem *elem)
1121  * \par Description
1122  * This routine enters an new element, elem, into the list denoted by list.
1123  * Before the new element is queued, its TimeLeft field (the amount of time
1124  * before the object comes due) is set to the value stored in its TotalTime
1125  * field. In order to keep TimeLeft fields current, the TM Rescan() function
1126  * may be used. 
1127  * \par Error Codes 
1128  * ---No return value is generated. 
1129  * 
1130  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-4-4 Section 2.3.4.4: TM Rescan _ Update all
1131  *      timers in the list 
1132  * 
1133  * \par
1134  * int TM Rescan(IN struct TM Elem *list) 
1135  * \par Description 
1136  * This function updates the TimeLeft fields of all timers on the given list.
1137  * This is done by checking the time-of-day clock. Note: this is the only
1138  * routine other than TM Init() that updates the TimeLeft field in the elements
1139  * on the list. 
1140  * \par
1141  * Instead of returning a value indicating success or failure, TM Rescan()
1142  * returns the number of entries that were discovered to have timed out. 
1143  * \par Error Codes 
1144  * ---Instead of error codes, the number of entries that were discovered to
1145  *  have timed out is returned. 
1146  * 
1147  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-4-5 Section 2.3.4.5: TM GetExpired _ Returns an
1148  *      expired timer 
1149  * 
1150  * \par
1151  * struct TM Elem *TM GetExpired(IN struct TM Elem *list) 
1152  * \par Description 
1153  * This routine searches the specified timer list and returns a pointer to an
1154  * expired timer element from that list. An expired timer is one whose TimeLeft
1155  * field is less than or equal to zero. If there are no expired timers, a null
1156  * element pointer is returned. 
1157  * \par Error Codes 
1158  * ---Instead of error codes, an expired timer pointer is returned, or a null
1159  *  timer pointer if there are no expired timer objects. 
1160  * 
1161  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-4-6 Section 2.3.4.6: TM GetEarliest _ Returns
1162  *      earliest unexpired timer 
1163  * 
1164  * \par
1165  * struct TM Elem *TM GetEarliest(IN struct TM Elem *list) 
1166  * \par Description 
1167  * This function returns a pointer to the timer element that will be next to
1168  * expire on the given list. This is defined to be the timer element with the
1169  * smallest (positive) TimeLeft field. If there are no timers on the list, or
1170  * if they are all expired, this function will return a null pointer. 
1171  * \par Error Codes 
1172  * ---Instead of error codes, a pointer to the next timer element to expireis
1173  *  returned, or a null timer object pointer if they are all expired. 
1174  * 
1175  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-4-7 Section 2.3.4.7: TM eql _ Test for equality
1176  *      of two timestamps 
1177  * 
1178  * \par
1179  * bool TM eql(IN struct timemval *t1; IN struct timemval *t2) 
1180  * \par Description 
1181  * This function compares the given timestamps, t1 and t2, for equality. Note
1182  * that the function return value, bool, has been set via typedef to be
1183  * equivalent to unsigned char. 
1184  * \par Error Codes 
1185  * 0 If the two timestamps differ. 
1186  * \n 1 If the two timestamps are identical. 
1187  * 
1188  *      \subsection sec2-3-5 Section 2.3.5: Fast Time 
1189  * \par
1190  * This section covers the calling interface to the fast time package
1191  * associated with the LWP facility. 
1192  * 
1193  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-5-1 Section 2.3.5.1: FT Init _ Initialize the
1194  *      fast time package 
1195  * 
1196  * \par
1197  * int FT Init(IN int printErrors; IN int notReally) 
1198  * \par Description 
1199  * This routine initializes the fast time package, mapping in the kernel page
1200  * containing the time-of-day variable. The printErrors argument, if non-zero,
1201  * will cause any errors in initalization to be printed to stderr. The
1202  * notReally parameter specifies whether initialization is really to be done.
1203  * Other calls in this package will do auto-initialization, and hence the
1204  * option is offered here. 
1205  * \par Error Codes 
1206  * -1 Indicates that future calls to FT GetTimeOfDay() will still work, but
1207  *  will not be able to access the information directly, having to make a
1208  *  kernel call every time. 
1209  * 
1210  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-5-2 Section 2.3.5.2: FT GetTimeOfDay _ Initialize
1211  *      the fast time package 
1212  * 
1213  * \par
1214  * int FT GetTimeOfDay(IN struct timeval *tv; IN struct timezone *tz) 
1215  * \par Description 
1216  * This routine is meant to mimic the parameters and behavior of the unix
1217  * gettimeofday() function. However, as implemented, it simply calls
1218  * gettimeofday() and then does some bound-checking to make sure the value is
1219  * reasonable. 
1220  * \par Error Codes 
1221  * <misc> Whatever value was returned by gettimeofday() internally. 
1222  * 
1223  *      \subsection sec2-3-6 Section 2.3.6: Preemption 
1224  * \par
1225  * This section covers the calling interface to the preemption package
1226  * associated with the LWP facility. 
1227  * 
1228  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-6-1 Section 2.3.6.1: PRE InitPreempt _ Initialize
1229  *      the preemption package 
1230  * 
1231  * \par
1232  * int PRE InitPreempt(IN struct timeval *slice) 
1233  * \par Description 
1234  * This function must be called to initialize the preemption package. It must
1235  * appear sometime after the call to LWP InitializeProcessSupport() and
1236  * sometime before the first call to any other preemption routine. The slice
1237  * argument specifies the time slice size to use. If the slice pointer is set
1238  * to null in the call, then the default time slice, DEFAULTSLICE (10
1239  * milliseconds), will be used. This routine uses the unix interval timer and
1240  * handling of the unix alarm signal, SIGALRM, to implement this timeslicing. 
1241  * \par Error Codes 
1242  * LWP EINIT The LWP package hasn't been initialized. 
1243  * \n LWP ESYSTEM Operations on the signal vector or the interval timer have
1244  * failed. 
1245  * 
1246  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-6-2 Section 2.3.6.2: PRE EndPreempt _ finalize
1247  *      the preemption package 
1248  * 
1249  * \par
1250  * int PRE EndPreempt() 
1251  * \par Description 
1252  * This routine finalizes use of the preemption package. No further preemptions
1253  * will be made. Note that it is not necessary to make this call before exit.
1254  * PRE EndPreempt() is provided only for those applications that wish to
1255  * continue after turning off preemption. 
1256  * \par Error Codes 
1257  * LWP EINIT The LWP package hasn't been initialized. 
1258  * \n LWP ESYSTEM Operations on the signal vector or the interval timer have
1259  * failed. 
1260  * 
1261  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-6-3 Section 2.3.6.3: PRE PreemptMe _ Mark thread
1262  *      as preemptible 
1263  * 
1264  * \par
1265  * int PRE PreemptMe() 
1266  * \par Description 
1267  * This macro is used to signify the current thread as a candidate for
1268  * preemption. The LWP InitializeProcessSupport() routine must have been called
1269  * before PRE PreemptMe(). 
1270  * \par Error Codes 
1271  * ---No return code is generated. 
1272  * 
1273  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-6-4 Section 2.3.6.4: PRE BeginCritical _ Enter
1274  *      thread critical section 
1275  * 
1276  * \par
1277  * int PRE BeginCritical() 
1278  * \par Description 
1279  * This macro places the current thread in a critical section. Upon return, and
1280  * for as long as the thread is in the critical section, involuntary
1281  * preemptions of this LWP will no longer occur. 
1282  * \par Error Codes 
1283  * ---No return code is generated. 
1284  * 
1285  *      \subsubsection sec2-3-6-5 Section 2.3.6.5: PRE EndCritical _ Exit
1286  *      thread critical section 
1287  * 
1288  * \par
1289  * int PRE EndCritical() 
1290  * \par Description 
1291  * This macro causes the executing thread to leave a critical section
1292  * previously entered via PRE BeginCritical(). If involuntary preemptions were
1293  * possible before the matching PRE BeginCritical(), they are once again
1294  * possible. 
1295  * \par Error Codes 
1296  * ---No return code is generated. 
1297  * 
1298  *      \page chap3 Chapter 3 -- Rxkad 
1299  * 
1300  * 
1301  *      \section sec3-1 Section 3.1: Introduction 
1302  * 
1303  * \par
1304  * The rxkad security module is offered as one of the built-in Rx
1305  * authentication models. It is based on the Kerberos system developed by MIT's
1306  * Project Athena. Readers wishing detailed information regarding Kerberos
1307  * design and implementation are directed to [2]. This chapter is devoted to
1308  * defining how Kerberos authentication services are made available as Rx
1309  * components, and assumes the reader has some familiarity with Kerberos.
1310  * Included are descriptions of how client-side and server-side Rx security
1311  * objects (struct rx securityClass; see Section 5.3.1.1) implementing this
1312  * protocol may be generated by an Rx application. Also, a description appears
1313  * of the set of routines available in the associated struct rx securityOps
1314  * structures, as covered in Section 5.3.1.2. It is strongly recommended that
1315  * the reader become familiar with this section on struct rx securityOps before
1316  * reading on. 
1317  * 
1318  *      \section sec3-2 Section 3.2: Definitions 
1319  * 
1320  * \par
1321  * An important set of definitions related to the rxkad security package is
1322  * provided by the rxkad.h include file. Determined here are various values for
1323  * ticket lifetimes, along with structures for encryption keys and Kerberos
1324  * principals. Declarations for the two routines required to generate the
1325  * different rxkad security objects also appear here. The two functions are
1326  * named rxkad NewServerSecurityObject() and rxkad NewClientSecurityObject().
1327  * In addition, type field values, encryption levels, security index
1328  * operations, and statistics structures may be found in this file. 
1329  *      \section sec3-3 Section 3.3: Exported Objects 
1330  * \par
1331  * To be usable as an Rx security module, the rxkad facility exports routines
1332  * to create server-side and client-side security objects. The server
1333  * authentication object is incorporated into the server code when calling rx
1334  * NewService(). The client authentication object is incorporated into the
1335  * client code every time a connection is established via rx NewConnection().
1336  * Also, in order to implement these security objects, the rxkad module must
1337  * provide definitions for some subset of the generic security operations as
1338  * defined in the appropriate struct rx securityOps variable. 
1339  * 
1340  *      \subsection sec3-3-1 Section 3.3.1: Server-Side Mechanisms 
1341  * 
1342  *      \subsubsection sec3-3-1-1 Section 3.3.1.1: Security Operations 
1343  * 
1344  * \par
1345  * The server side of the rxkad module fills in all but two of the possible
1346  * routines associated with an Rx security object, as described in Section
1347  * 5.3.1.2. 
1348  * 
1349  * \code
1350  * static struct rx_securityOps rxkad_server_ops = { 
1351  *      rxkad_Close,
1352  *      rxkad_NewConnection,
1353  *      rxkad_PreparePacket, /* Once per packet creation */
1354  *      0, /* Send packet (once per retrans) */
1355  *      rxkad_CheckAuthentication,
1356  *      rxkad_CreateChallenge,
1357  *      rxkad_GetChallenge,
1358  *      0,
1359  *      rxkad_CheckResponse, /* Check data packet */
1360  *      rxkad_DestroyConnection,
1361  *      rxkad_GetStats,
1362  * };
1363  * \endcode
1364  * 
1365  * \par
1366  * The rxkad service does not need to take any special action each time a
1367  * packet belonging to a call in an rxkad Rx connection is physically
1368  * transmitted. Thus, a routine is not supplied for the op SendPacket()
1369  * function slot. Similarly, no preparatory work needs to be done previous to
1370  * the reception of a response packet from a security challenge, so the op
1371  * GetResponse() function slot is also empty. 
1372  * 
1373  *      \subsubsection sec3-3-1-2 Section 3.3.1.2: Security Object 
1374  * 
1375  * \par
1376  * The exported routine used to generate an rxkad-specific server-side security
1377  * class object is named rxdad NewServerSecurityObject(). It is declared with
1378  * four parameters, as follows: 
1379  * 
1380  * \code
1381  * struct rx_securityClass * 
1382  * rxkad_NewServerSecurityObject(a_level, a_getKeyRockP, a_getKeyP, a_userOKP) 
1383  * rxkad_level a_level; /* Minimum level */
1384  * char *a_getKeyRockP; /* Rock for get_key implementor */
1385  * int (*a_getKeyP)(); /* Passed kvno & addr(key) to fill */
1386  * int (*a_userOKP)(); /* Passed name, inst, cell => bool */
1387  * \endcode
1388  * 
1389  * \par
1390  * The first argument specifies the desired level of encryption, and may take
1391  * on the following values (as defined in rxkad.h): 
1392  * \li rxkad clear: Specifies that packets are to be sent entirely in the
1393  * clear, without any encryption whatsoever. 
1394  * \li rxkad auth: Specifies that packet sequence numbers are to be encrypted. 
1395  * \li rxkad crypt: Specifies that the entire data packet is to be encrypted. 
1396  * 
1397  * \par
1398  * The second and third parameters represent, respectively, a pointer to a
1399  * private data area, sometimes called a "rock", and a procedure reference that
1400  * is called with the key version number accompanying the Kerberos ticket and
1401  * returns a pointer to the server's decryption key. The fourth argument, if
1402  * not null, is a pointer to a function that will be called for every new
1403  * connection with the client's name, instance, and cell. This routine should
1404  * return zero if the user is not acceptable to the server. 
1405  * 
1406  *      \subsection sec3-3-2 Section 3.3.2: Client-Side Mechanisms 
1407  * 
1408  *      \subsubsection sec3-3-2-1 Section 3.3.2.1: Security Operations 
1409  * 
1410  * \par
1411  * The client side of the rxkad module fills in relatively few of the routines
1412  * associated with an Rx security object, as demonstrated below. The general Rx
1413  * security object, of which this is an instance, is described in detail in
1414  * Section 5.3.1.2. 
1415  * 
1416  * \code
1417  * static struct rx_securityOps rxkad_client_ops = { 
1418  *      rxkad_Close, 
1419  *      rxkad_NewConnection, /* Every new connection */
1420  *      rxkad_PreparePacket, /* Once per packet creation */
1421  *      0, /* Send packet (once per retrans) */
1422  *      0,
1423  *      0,
1424  *      0,
1425  *      rxkad_GetResponse, /* Respond to challenge packet */
1426  *      0,
1427  *      rxkad_CheckPacket, /* Check data packet */
1428  *      rxkad_DestroyConnection,
1429  *      rxkad_GetStats,
1430  *      0,
1431  *      0,
1432  *      0,
1433  * };
1434  * \endcode
1435  * 
1436  * \par
1437  * As expected, routines are defined for use when someone destroys a security
1438  * object (rxkad Close()) and when an Rx connection using the rxkad model
1439  * creates a new connection (rxkad NewConnection()) or deletes an existing one
1440  * (rxkad DestroyConnection()). Security-specific operations must also be
1441  * performed in behalf of rxkad when packets are created (rxkad
1442  * PreparePacket()) and received (rxkad CheckPacket()). finally, the client
1443  * side of an rxkad security object must also be capable of constructing
1444  * responses to security challenges from the server (rxkad GetResponse()) and
1445  * be willing to reveal statistics on its own operation (rxkad GetStats()). 
1446  * 
1447  *      \subsubsection sec3-3-2-2 Section 3.3.2.2: Security Object 
1448  * 
1449  * \par
1450  * The exported routine used to generate an rxkad-specific client-side security
1451  * class object is named rxkad NewClientSecurityObject(). It is declared with
1452  * five parameters, specified below: 
1453  * 
1454  * \code
1455  * struct rx_securityClass * rxkad_NewClientSecurityObject(
1456  *                              a_level, 
1457  *                              a_sessionKeyP, 
1458  *                              a_kvno, 
1459  *                              a_ticketLen, 
1460  *                              a_ticketP
1461  *                              ) 
1462  * rxkad_level a_level; 
1463  * struct ktc_encryptionKey *a_sessionKeyP; 
1464  * long a_kvno; 
1465  * int a_ticketLen; 
1466  * char *a_ticketP; 
1467  * \endcode
1468  * 
1469  * \par
1470  * The first parameter, a level, specifies the level of encryption desired for
1471  * this security object, with legal choices being identical to those defined
1472  * for the server-side security object described in Section 3.3.1.2. The second
1473  * parameter, a sessionKeyP, provides the session key to use. The ktc
1474  * encryptionKey structure is defined in the rxkad.h include file, and consists
1475  * of an array of 8 characters. The third parameter, a kvno, provides the key
1476  * version number associated with a sessionKeyP. The fourth argument, a
1477  * ticketLen, communicates the length in bytes of the data stored in the fifth
1478  * parameter, a ticketP, which points to the Kerberos ticket to use for the
1479  * principal for which the security object will operate. 
1480  * 
1481  *      \page chap4 Chapter 4 -- Rx Support Packages 
1482  * 
1483  *      \section sec4-1 Section 4.1: Introduction 
1484  * \par
1485  * This chapter documents three packages defined directly in support of the Rx
1486  * facility. 
1487  * \li rx queue: Doubly-linked queue package. 
1488  * \li rx clock: Clock package, using the 4.3BSD interval timer. 
1489  * \li rx event: Future events package. 
1490  * \par
1491  * References to constants, structures, and functions defined by these support
1492  * packages will appear in the following API chapter. 
1493  * 
1494  *      \section sec4-2 Section 4.2: The rx queue Package 
1495  * 
1496  * \par
1497  * This package provides a doubly-linked queue structure, along with a full
1498  * suite of related operations. The main concern behind the coding of this
1499  * facility was efficiency. All functions are implemented as macros, and it is
1500  * suggested that only simple expressions be used for all parameters. 
1501  * \par
1502  * The rx queue facility is defined by the rx queue.h include file. Some macros
1503  * visible in this file are intended for rx queue internal use only. An
1504  * understanding of these "hidden" macros is important, so they will also be
1505  * described by this document. 
1506  * 
1507  *      \subsection sec4-2-1 Section 4.2.1: struct queue 
1508  * 
1509  * \par
1510  * The queue structure provides the linkage information required to maintain a
1511  * queue of objects. The queue structure is prepended to any user-defined data
1512  * type which is to be organized in this fashion. 
1513  * \n \b fields 
1514  * \li struct queue *prev - Pointer to the previous queue header. 
1515  * \li struct queue *next - Pointer to the next queue header. 
1516  * \par
1517  * Note that a null Rx queue consists of a single struct queue object whose
1518  * next and previous pointers refer to itself. 
1519  * 
1520  *      \subsection sec4-2-2 Section 4.2.2: Internal Operations 
1521  * 
1522  * \par
1523  * This section describes the internal operations defined for Rx queues. They
1524  * will be referenced by the external operations documented in Section 4.2.3. 
1525  * 
1526  *      \subsection sec4-2-2-1 Section 4.2.2.1: Q(): Coerce type to a queue
1527  *      element 
1528  * 
1529  * \par
1530  * \#define _Q(x) ((struct queue *)(x)) 
1531  * \par
1532  * This operation coerces the user structure named by x to a queue element. Any
1533  * user structure using the rx queue package must have a struct queue as its
1534  * first field. 
1535  * 
1536  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-2-2 Section 4.2.2.2: QA(): Add a queue element
1537  *      before/after another element 
1538  * 
1539  * \par
1540  * \#define _QA(q,i,a,b) (((i->a=q->a)->b=i)->b=q, q->a=i) 
1541  * \par
1542  * This operation adds the queue element referenced by i either before or after
1543  * a queue element represented by q. If the (a, b) argument pair corresponds to
1544  * an element's (next, prev) fields, the new element at i will be linked after
1545  * q. If the (a, b) argument pair corresponds to an element's (prev, next)
1546  * fields, the new element at i will be linked before q. 
1547  * 
1548  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-2-3 QR(): Remove a queue element 
1549  * 
1550  * \par
1551  * \#define _QR(i) ((_Q(i)->prev->next=_Q(i)->next)->prev=_Q(i)->prev) 
1552  * \par
1553  * This operation removes the queue element referenced by i from its queue. The
1554  * prev and next fields within queue element i itself is not updated to reflect
1555  * the fact that it is no longer part of the queue. 
1556  * 
1557  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-2-4 QS(): Splice two queues together 
1558  * 
1559  * \par
1560  * \#define _QS(q1,q2,a,b) if (queue_IsEmpty(q2)); else
1561  * ((((q2->a->b=q1)->a->b=q2->b)->a=q1->a, q1->a=q2->a), queue_Init(q2)) 
1562  * \par
1563  * This operation takes the queues identified by q1 and q2 and splices them
1564  * together into a single queue. The order in which the two queues are appended
1565  * is determined by the a and b arguments. If the (a, b) argument pair
1566  * corresponds to q1's (next, prev) fields, then q2 is appended to q1. If the
1567  * (a, b) argument pair corresponds to q1's (prev, next) fields, then q is
1568  * prepended to q2. 
1569  * \par
1570  * This internal QS() routine uses two exported queue operations, namely queue
1571  * Init() and queue IsEmpty(), defined in Sections 4.2.3.1 and 4.2.3.16
1572  * respectively below. 
1573  * 
1574  *      \subsection sec4-2-3 Section 4.2.3: External Operations 
1575  * 
1576  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-3-1 Section 4.2.3.1: queue Init(): Initialize a
1577  *      queue header 
1578  * 
1579  * \par
1580  * \#define queue_Init(q) (_Q(q))->prev = (_Q(q))->next = (_Q(q)) 
1581  * \par
1582  * The queue header referred to by the q argument is initialized so that it
1583  * describes a null (empty) queue. A queue head is simply a queue element. 
1584  * 
1585  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-3-2 Section 4.2.3.2: queue Prepend(): Put element
1586  *      at the head of a queue 
1587  * 
1588  * \par
1589  * \#define queue_Prepend(q,i) _QA(_Q(q),_Q(i),next,prev) 
1590  * \par
1591  * Place queue element i at the head of the queue denoted by q. The new queue
1592  * element, i, should not currently be on any queue. 
1593  * 
1594  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-3-3 Section 4.2.3.3: queue Append(): Put an
1595  *      element a the tail of a queue 
1596  * 
1597  * \par
1598  * \#define queue_Append(q,i) _QA(_Q(q),_Q(i),prev,next) 
1599  * \par
1600  * Place queue element i at the tail of the queue denoted by q. The new queue
1601  * element, i, should not currently be on any queue. 
1602  * 
1603  *      \subsection sec4-2-3-4 Section 4.2.3.4: queue InsertBefore(): Insert a
1604  *      queue element before another element 
1605  * 
1606  * \par
1607  * \#define queue_InsertBefore(i1,i2) _QA(_Q(i1),_Q(i2),prev,next) 
1608  * \par
1609  * Insert queue element i2 before element i1 in i1's queue. The new queue
1610  * element, i2, should not currently be on any queue. 
1611  * 
1612  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-3-5 Section 4.2.3.5: queue InsertAfter(): Insert
1613  *      a queue element after another element 
1614  * 
1615  * \par
1616  * \#define queue_InsertAfter(i1,i2) _QA(_Q(i1),_Q(i2),next,prev) 
1617  * \par
1618  * Insert queue element i2 after element i1 in i1's queue. The new queue
1619  * element, i2, should not currently be on any queue. 
1620  * 
1621  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-3-6 Section: 4.2.3.6: queue SplicePrepend():
1622  *      Splice one queue before another 
1623  * 
1624  * \par
1625  * \#define queue_SplicePrepend(q1,q2) _QS(_Q(q1),_Q(q2),next,prev) 
1626  * \par
1627  * Splice the members of the queue located at q2 to the beginning of the queue
1628  * located at q1, reinitializing queue q2. 
1629  * 
1630  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-3-7 Section 4.2.3.7: queue SpliceAppend(): Splice
1631  *      one queue after another 
1632  * 
1633  * \par
1634  * \#define queue_SpliceAppend(q1,q2) _QS(_Q(q1),_Q(q2),prev,next) 
1635  * \par
1636  * Splice the members of the queue located at q2 to the end of the queue
1637  * located at q1, reinitializing queue q2. Note that the implementation of
1638  * queue SpliceAppend() is identical to that of queue SplicePrepend() except
1639  * for the order of the next and prev arguments to the internal queue splicer,
1640  * QS(). 
1641  * 
1642  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-3-8 Section 4.2.3.8: queue Replace(): Replace the
1643  *      contents of a queue with that of another 
1644  * 
1645  * \par
1646  * \#define queue_Replace(q1,q2) (*_Q(q1) = *_Q(q2), 
1647  * \n _Q(q1)->next->prev = _Q(q1)->prev->next = _Q(q1), 
1648  * \n queue_Init(q2)) 
1649  * \par
1650  * Replace the contents of the queue located at q1 with the contents of the
1651  * queue located at q2. The prev and next fields from q2 are copied into the
1652  * queue object referenced by q1, and the appropriate element pointers are
1653  * reassigned. After the replacement has occurred, the queue header at q2 is
1654  * reinitialized. 
1655  * 
1656  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-3-9 Section 4.2.3.9: queue Remove(): Remove an
1657  *      element from its queue 
1658  * 
1659  * \par
1660  * \#define queue_Remove(i) (_QR(i), _Q(i)->next = 0) 
1661  * \par
1662  * This function removes the queue element located at i from its queue. The
1663  * next field for the removed entry is zeroed. Note that multiple removals of
1664  * the same queue item are not supported. 
1665  * 
1666  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-3-10 Section 4.2.3.10: queue MoveAppend(): Move
1667  *      an element from its queue to the end of another queue 
1668  * 
1669  * \par
1670  * \#define queue_MoveAppend(q,i) (_QR(i), queue_Append(q,i)) 
1671  * \par
1672  * This macro removes the queue element located at i from its current queue.
1673  * Once removed, the element at i is appended to the end of the queue located
1674  * at q. 
1675  * 
1676  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-3-11 Section 4.2.3.11: queue MovePrepend(): Move
1677  *      an element from its queue to the head of another queue 
1678  * 
1679  * \par
1680  * \#define queue_MovePrepend(q,i) (_QR(i), queue_Prepend(q,i)) 
1681  * \par
1682  * This macro removes the queue element located at i from its current queue.
1683  * Once removed, the element at i is inserted at the head fo the queue located
1684  * at q. 
1685  * 
1686  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-3-12 Section 4.2.3.12: queue first(): Return the
1687  *      first element of a queue, coerced to a particular type 
1688  * 
1689  * \par
1690  * \#define queue_first(q,s) ((struct s *)_Q(q)->next) 
1691  * \par
1692  * Return a pointer to the first element of the queue located at q. The
1693  * returned pointer value is coerced to conform to the given s structure. Note
1694  * that a properly coerced pointer to the queue head is returned if q is empty. 
1695  * 
1696  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-3-13 Section 4.2.3.13: queue Last(): Return the
1697  *      last element of a queue, coerced to a particular type 
1698  * 
1699  * \par
1700  * \#define queue_Last(q,s) ((struct s *)_Q(q)->prev) 
1701  * \par
1702  * Return a pointer to the last element of the queue located at q. The returned
1703  * pointer value is coerced to conform to the given s structure. Note that a
1704  * properly coerced pointer to the queue head is returned if q is empty. 
1705  * 
1706  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-3-14 Section 4.2.3.14: queue Next(): Return the
1707  *      next element of a queue, coerced to a particular type 
1708  * 
1709  * \par
1710  * \#define queue_Next(i,s) ((struct s *)_Q(i)->next) 
1711  * \par
1712  * Return a pointer to the queue element occuring after the element located at
1713  * i. The returned pointer value is coerced to conform to the given s
1714  * structure. Note that a properly coerced pointer to the queue head is
1715  * returned if item i is the last in its queue. 
1716  * 
1717  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-3-15 Section 4.2.3.15: queue Prev(): Return the
1718  *      next element of a queue, coerced to a particular type 
1719  * 
1720  * \par
1721  * \#define queue_Prev(i,s) ((struct s *)_Q(i)->prev) 
1722  * \par
1723  * Return a pointer to the queue element occuring before the element located at
1724  * i. The returned pointer value is coerced to conform to the given s
1725  * structure. Note that a properly coerced pointer to the queue head is
1726  * returned if item i is the first in its queue. 
1727  * 
1728  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-3-16 Section 4.2.3.16: queue IsEmpty(): Is the
1729  *      given queue empty? 
1730  * 
1731  * \par
1732  * \#define queue_IsEmpty(q) (_Q(q)->next == _Q(q)) 
1733  * \par
1734  * Return a non-zero value if the queue located at q does not have any elements
1735  * in it. In this case, the queue consists solely of the queue header at q
1736  * whose next and prev fields reference itself. 
1737  * 
1738  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-3-17 Section 4.2.3.17: queue IsNotEmpty(): Is the
1739  *      given queue not empty? 
1740  * 
1741  * \par
1742  * \#define queue_IsNotEmpty(q) (_Q(q)->next != _Q(q)) 
1743  * \par
1744  * Return a non-zero value if the queue located at q has at least one element
1745  * in it other than the queue header itself. 
1746  * 
1747  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-3-18 Section 4.2.3.18: queue IsOnQueue(): Is an
1748  *      element currently queued? 
1749  * 
1750  * \par
1751  * \#define queue_IsOnQueue(i) (_Q(i)->next != 0) 
1752  * \par
1753  * This macro returns a non-zero value if the queue item located at i is
1754  * currently a member of a queue. This is determined by examining its next
1755  * field. If it is non-null, the element is considered to be queued. Note that
1756  * any element operated on by queue Remove() (Section 4.2.3.9) will have had
1757  * its next field zeroed. Hence, it would cause a non-zero return from this
1758  * call. 
1759  * 
1760  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-3-19 Section 4.2.3.19: queue Isfirst(): Is an
1761  *      element the first on a queue? 
1762  * 
1763  * \par
1764  * \#define queue_Isfirst(q,i) (_Q(q)->first == _Q(i)) 
1765  * \par
1766  * This macro returns a non-zero value if the queue item located at i is the
1767  * first element in the queue denoted by q. 
1768  * 
1769  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-3-20 Section 4.2.3.20: queue IsLast(): Is an
1770  *      element the last on a queue? 
1771  * 
1772  * \par
1773  * \#define queue_IsLast(q,i) (_Q(q)->prev == _Q(i)) 
1774  * \par
1775  * This macro returns a non-zero value if the queue item located at i is the
1776  * last element in the queue denoted by q. 
1777  * 
1778  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-3-21 Section 4.2.3.21: queue IsEnd(): Is an
1779  *      element the end of a queue? 
1780  * 
1781  * \par
1782  * \#define queue_IsEnd(q,i) (_Q(q) == _Q(i)) 
1783  * \par
1784  * This macro returns a non-zero value if the queue item located at i is the
1785  * end of the queue located at q. Basically, it determines whether a queue
1786  * element in question is also the queue header structure itself, and thus does
1787  * not represent an actual queue element. This function is useful for
1788  * terminating an iterative sweep through a queue, identifying when the search
1789  * has wrapped to the queue header. 
1790  * 
1791  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-3-22 Section 4.2.3.22: queue Scan(): for loop
1792  *      test for scanning a queue in a forward direction 
1793  * 
1794  * \par
1795  * \#define queue_Scan(q, qe, next, s) 
1796  * \n (qe) = queue_first(q, s), next = queue_Next(qe, s); 
1797  * \n !queue_IsEnd(q, qe); 
1798  * \n (qe) = (next), next = queue_Next(qe, s) 
1799  * \par
1800  * This macro may be used as the body of a for loop test intended to scan
1801  * through each element in the queue located at q. The qe argument is used as
1802  * the for loop variable. The next argument is used to store the next value for
1803  * qe in the upcoming loop iteration. The s argument provides the name of the
1804  * structure to which each queue element is to be coerced. Thus, the values
1805  * provided for the qe and next arguments must be of type (struct s *). 
1806  * \par
1807  * An example of how queue Scan() may be used appears in the code fragment
1808  * below. It declares a structure named mystruct, which is suitable for
1809  * queueing. This queueable structure is composed of the queue pointers
1810  * themselves followed by an integer value. The actual queue header is kept in
1811  * demoQueue, and the currItemP and nextItemP variables are used to step
1812  * through the demoQueue. The queue Scan() macro is used in the for loop to
1813  * generate references in currItemP to each queue element in turn for each
1814  * iteration. The loop is used to increment every queued structure's myval
1815  * field by one. 
1816  * 
1817  * \code
1818  * struct mystruct { 
1819  *      struct queue q; 
1820  *      int myval; 
1821  * }; 
1822  * struct queue demoQueue; 
1823  * struct mystruct *currItemP, *nextItemP; 
1824  * ... 
1825  * for (queue_Scan(&demoQueue, currItemP, nextItemP, mystruct)) { 
1826  *      currItemP->myval++; 
1827  * } 
1828  * \endcode
1829  * 
1830  * \par
1831  * Note that extra initializers can be added before the body of the queue
1832  * Scan() invocation above, and extra expressions can be added afterwards. 
1833  * 
1834  *      \subsubsection sec4-2-3-23 Section 4.2.3.23: queue ScanBackwards(): for
1835  *      loop test for scanning a queue in a reverse direction 
1836  * 
1837  * \par
1838  * #define queue_ScanBackwards(q, qe, prev, s) 
1839  * \n (qe) = queue_Last(q, s), prev = queue_Prev(qe, s); 
1840  * \n !queue_IsEnd(q, qe); 
1841  * \n (qe) = prev, prev = queue_Prev(qe, s) 
1842  * \par
1843  * This macro is identical to the queue Scan() macro described above in Section
1844  * 4.2.3.22 except for the fact that the given queue is scanned backwards,
1845  * starting at the last item in the queue. 
1846  * 
1847  *      \section sec4-3 Section 4.3: The rx clock Package 
1848  * 
1849  * \par
1850  * This package maintains a clock which is independent of the time of day. It
1851  * uses the unix 4.3BSD interval timer (e.g., getitimer(), setitimer()) in
1852  * TIMER REAL mode. Its definition and interface may be found in the rx clock.h
1853  * include file. 
1854  * 
1855  *      \subsection sec4-3-1 Section 4.3.1: struct clock 
1856  * 
1857  * \par
1858  * This structure is used to represent a clock value as understood by this
1859  * package. It consists of two fields, storing the number of seconds and
1860  * microseconds that have elapsed since the associated clock Init() routine has
1861  * been called. 
1862  * \par
1863  * \b fields 
1864  * \n long sec -Seconds since call to clock Init(). 
1865  * \n long usec -Microseconds since call to clock Init(). 
1866  * 
1867  *      \subsection sec4-3-2 Section 4.3.12: clock nUpdates 
1868  * 
1869  * \par
1870  * The integer-valued clock nUpdates is a variable exported by the rx clock
1871  * facility. It records the number of times the clock value is actually
1872  * updated. It is bumped each time the clock UpdateTime() routine is called, as
1873  * described in Section 4.3.3.2. 
1874  * 
1875  *      \subsection sec4-3-3 Section 4.3.3: Operations 
1876  * 
1877  *      \subsubsection sec4-3-3-1 Section 4.3.3.1: clock Init(): Initialize the
1878  *      clock package 
1879  * 
1880  * \par
1881  * This routine uses the unix setitimer() call to initialize the unix interval
1882  * timer. If the setitimer() call fails, an error message will appear on
1883  * stderr, and an exit(1) will be executed. 
1884  * 
1885  *      \subsubsection sec4-3-3-2 Section 4.3.3.2: clock UpdateTime(): Compute
1886  *      the current time 
1887  * 
1888  * \par
1889  * The clock UpdateTime() function calls the unix getitimer() routine in order
1890  * to update the current time. The exported clock nUpdates variable is
1891  * incremented each time the clock UpdateTime() routine is called. 
1892  * 
1893  *      \subsubsection sec4-3-3-3 Section 4.3.3.3: clock GetTime(): Return the
1894  *      current clock time 
1895  * 
1896  * \par
1897  * This macro updates the current time if necessary, and returns the current
1898  * time into the cv argument, which is declared to be of type (struct clock *). 
1899  * 4.3.3.4 clock Sec(): Get the current clock time, truncated to seconds 
1900  * This macro returns the long value of the sec field of the current time. The
1901  * recorded time is updated if necessary before the above value is returned. 
1902  * 
1903  *      \subsubsection sec4-3-3-5 Section 4.3.3.5: clock ElapsedTime(): Measure
1904  *      milliseconds between two given clock values 
1905  * 
1906  * \par
1907  * This macro returns the elapsed time in milliseconds between the two clock
1908  * structure pointers provided as arguments, cv1 and cv2. 
1909  * 
1910  *      \subsubsection sec4-3-3-6 Section 4.3.3.6: clock Advance(): Advance the
1911  *      recorded clock time by a specified clock value 
1912  * 
1913  * \par
1914  * This macro takes a single (struct clock *) pointer argument, cv, and adds
1915  * this clock value to the internal clock value maintined by the package. 
1916  * 
1917  *      \subsubsection sec4-3-3-7 Section 4.3.3.7: clock Gt(): Is a clock value
1918  *      greater than another? 
1919  * 
1920  * \par
1921  * This macro takes two parameters of type (struct clock *), a and b. It
1922  * returns a nonzero value if the a parameter points to a clock value which is
1923  * later than the one pointed to by b. 
1924  * 
1925  *      \subsubsection sec4-3-3-8 Section 4.3.3.8: clock Ge(): Is a clock value
1926  *      greater than or equal to another? 
1927  * 
1928  * \par
1929  * This macro takes two parameters of type (struct clock *), a and b. It
1930  * returns a nonzero value if the a parameter points to a clock value which is
1931  * greater than or equal to the one pointed to by b. 
1932  * 
1933  *      \subsubsection sec4-3-3-9 Section 4.3.3.9: clock Gt(): Are two clock
1934  *      values equal? 
1935  * 
1936  * \par
1937  * This macro takes two parameters of type (struct clock *), a and b. It
1938  * returns a non-zero value if the clock values pointed to by a and b are
1939  * equal. 
1940  * 
1941  *      \subsubsection sec4.3.3.10 Section 4.3.3.10: clock Le(): Is a clock
1942  *      value less than or equal to another? 
1943  * 
1944  * \par
1945  * This macro takes two parameters of type (struct clock *), a and b. It
1946  * returns a nonzero value if the a parameter points to a clock value which is
1947  * less than or equal to the one pointed to by b. 
1948  * 
1949  *      \subsubsection sec4-3-3-11 Section 4.3.3.11: clock Lt(): Is a clock
1950  *      value less than another? 
1951  * 
1952  * \par
1953  * This macro takes two parameters of type (struct clock *), a and b. It
1954  * returns a nonzero value if the a parameter points to a clock value which is
1955  * less than the one pointed to by b. 
1956  * 
1957  *      \subsubsection sec4-3-3-12 Section 4.3.3.12: clock IsZero(): Is a clock
1958  *      value zero? 
1959  * 
1960  * \par
1961  * This macro takes a single parameter of type (struct clock *), c. It returns
1962  * a non-zero value if the c parameter points to a clock value which is equal
1963  * to zero. 
1964  * 
1965  *      \subsubsection sec4-3-3-13 Section 4.3.3.13: clock Zero(): Set a clock
1966  *      value to zero 
1967  * 
1968  * \par
1969  * This macro takes a single parameter of type (struct clock *), c. It sets the
1970  * given clock value to zero. 
1971  *      \subsubsection sec4-3-3-14 Section 4.3.3.14: clock Add(): Add two clock
1972  *      values together 
1973  * \par
1974  * This macro takes two parameters of type (struct clock *), c1 and c2. It adds
1975  * the value of the time in c2 to c1. Both clock values must be positive. 
1976  * 
1977  *      \subsubsection sec4-3-3-15 Section 4.3.3.15: clock Sub(): Subtract two
1978  *      clock values 
1979  * 
1980  * \par
1981  * This macro takes two parameters of type (struct clock *), c1 and c2. It
1982  * subtracts the value of the time in c2 from c1. The time pointed to by c2
1983  * should be less than the time pointed to by c1. 
1984  * 
1985  *      \subsubsection sec4-3-3-16 Section 4.3.3.16: clock Float(): Convert a
1986  *      clock time into floating point 
1987  * 
1988  * \par
1989  * This macro takes a single parameter of type (struct clock *), c. It
1990  * expresses the given clock value as a floating point number. 
1991  * 
1992  *      \section sec4-4 Section 4.4: The rx event Package 
1993  * 
1994  * \par
1995  * This package maintains an event facility. An event is defined to be
1996  * something that happens at or after a specified clock time, unless cancelled
1997  * prematurely. The clock times used are those provided by the rx clock
1998  * facility described in Section 4.3 above. A user routine associated with an
1999  * event is called with the appropriate arguments when that event occurs. There
2000  * are some restrictions on user routines associated with such events. first,
2001  * this user-supplied routine should not cause process preemption. Also, the
2002  * event passed to the user routine is still resident on the event queue at the
2003  * time of invocation. The user must not remove this event explicitly (via an
2004  * event Cancel(), see below). Rather, the user routine may remove or schedule
2005  * any other event at this time. 
2006  * \par
2007  * The events recorded by this package are kept queued in order of expiration
2008  * time, so that the first entry in the queue corresponds to the event which is
2009  * the first to expire. This interface is defined by the rx event.h include
2010  * file. 
2011  * 
2012  *      \subsection sec4-4-1 Section 4.4.1: struct rxevent 
2013  * 
2014  * \par
2015  * This structure defines the format of an Rx event record. 
2016  * \par
2017  * \b fields 
2018  * \n struct queue junk -The queue to which this event belongs. 
2019  * \n struct clock eventTime -The clock time recording when this event comes
2020  * due. 
2021  * \n int (*func)() -The user-supplied function to call upon expiration. 
2022  * \n char *arg -The first argument to the (*func)() function above. 
2023  * \n char *arg1 -The second argument to the (*func)() function above. 
2024  * 
2025  *      \subsection sec4-4-2 Section 4.4.2: Operations 
2026  * 
2027  * \par
2028  * This section covers the interface routines provided for the Rx event
2029  * package. 
2030  * 
2031  *      \subsubsection sec4-4-2-1 Section 4.4.2.1: rxevent Init(): Initialize
2032  *      the event package 
2033  * 
2034  * \par
2035  * The rxevent Init() routine takes two arguments. The first, nEvents, is an
2036  * integer-valued parameter which specifies the number of event structures to
2037  * allocate at one time. This specifies the appropriate granularity of memory
2038  * allocation by the event package. The second parameter, scheduler, is a
2039  * pointer to an integer-valued function. This function is to be called when an
2040  * event is posted (added to the set of events managed by the package) that is
2041  * scheduled to expire before any other existing event. 
2042  * \par
2043  * This routine sets up future event allocation block sizes, initializes the
2044  * queues used to manage active and free event structures, and recalls that an
2045  * initialization has occurred. Thus, this function may be safely called
2046  * multiple times. 
2047  * 
2048  *      \subsubsection sec4-4-2-2 Section 4.4.2.2: rxevent Post(): Schedule an
2049  *      event 
2050  * 
2051  * \par
2052  * This function constructs a new event based on the information included in
2053  * its parameters and then schedules it. The rxevent Post() routine takes four
2054  * parameters. The first is named when, and is of type (struct clock *). It
2055  * specifies the clock time at which the event is to occur. The second
2056  * parameter is named func and is a pointer to the integer-valued function to
2057  * associate with the event that will be created. When the event comes due,
2058  * this function will be executed by the event package. The next two arguments
2059  * to rxevent Post() are named arg and arg1, and are both of type (char *).
2060  * They serve as the two arguments thath will be supplied to the func routine
2061  * when the event comes due. 
2062  * \par
2063  * If the given event is set to take place before any other event currently
2064  * posted, the scheduler routine established when the rxevent Init() routine
2065  * was called will be executed. This gives the application a chance to react to
2066  * this new event in a reasonable way. One might expect that this scheduler
2067  * routine will alter sleep times used by the application to make sure that it
2068  * executes in time to handle the new event. 
2069  * 
2070  *      \subsubsection sec4-4-2-3 Section 4.4.2.3: rxevent Cancel 1(): Cancel
2071  *      an event (internal use) 
2072  * 
2073  * \par
2074  * This routine removes an event from the set managed by this package. It takes
2075  * a single parameter named ev of type (struct rxevent *). The ev argument
2076  * identifies the pending event to be cancelled. 
2077  * \par
2078  * The rxevent Cancel 1() routine should never be called directly. Rather, it
2079  * should be accessed through the rxevent Cancel() macro, described in Section
2080  * 4.4.2.4 below. 
2081  * 
2082  *      \subsubsection sec4-4-2-4 Section 4.4.2.4: rxevent Cancel(): Cancel an
2083  *      event (external use) 
2084  * 
2085  * \par
2086  * This macro is the proper way to call the rxevent Cancel 1() routine
2087  * described in Section 4.4.2.3 above. Like rxevent Cancel 1(), it takes a
2088  * single argument. This event ptr argument is of type (struct rxevent *), and
2089  * identi#es the pending event to be cancelled. This macro #rst checks to see
2090  * if event ptr is null. If not, it calls rxevent Cancel 1() to perform the
2091  * real work. The event ptr argument is zeroed after the cancellation operation
2092  * completes. 
2093  * 
2094  *      \subsubsection sec4-4-2-5 Section 4.4.2.4: rxevent RaiseEvents():
2095  *      Initialize the event package 
2096  * 
2097  * \par
2098  * This function processes all events that have expired relative to the current
2099  * clock time maintained by the event package. Each qualifying event is removed
2100  * from the queue in order, and its user-supplied routine (func()) is executed
2101  * with the associated arguments. 
2102  * \par
2103  * The rxevent RaiseEvents() routine takes a single output parameter named
2104  * next, defined to be of type (struct clock *). Upon completion of rxevent
2105  * RaiseEvents(), the relative time to the next event due to expire is placed
2106  * in next. This knowledge may be used to calculate the amount of sleep time
2107  * before more event processing is needed. If there is no recorded event which
2108  * is still pending at this point, rxevent RaiseEvents() returns a zeroed clock
2109  * value into next. 
2110  * 
2111  *      \subsubsection sec4-4-2-6 Section 4.4.2.6: rxevent TimeToNextEvent():
2112  *      Get amount of time until the next event expires 
2113  * 
2114  * \par
2115  * This function returns the time between the current clock value as maintained
2116  * by the event package and the the next event's expiration time. This
2117  * information is placed in the single output argument,interval, defined to be
2118  * of type (struct clock *). The rxevent TimeToNextEvent() function returns
2119  * integer-valued quantities. If there are no scheduled events, a zero is
2120  * returned. If there are one or more scheduled events, a 1 is returned. If
2121  * zero is returned, the interval argument is not updated. 
2122  * 
2123  *      \page chap5 Chapter 5 -- Programming Interface 
2124  * 
2125  *      \section sec5-1 Section 5.1: Introduction 
2126  * 
2127  * \par
2128  * This chapter documents the API for the Rx facility. Included are
2129  * descriptions of all the constants, structures, exported variables, macros,
2130  * and interface functions available to the application programmer. This
2131  * interface is identical regardless of whether the application lives within
2132  * the unix kernel or above it. 
2133  * \par
2134  * This chapter actually provides more information than what may be strictly
2135  * considered the Rx API. Many objects that were intended to be opaque and for
2136  * Rx internal use only are also described here. The reason driving the
2137  * inclusion of this "extra" information is that such exported Rx interface
2138  * files as rx.h make these objects visible to application programmers. It is
2139  * prefereable to describe these objects here than to ignore them and leave
2140  * application programmers wondering as to their meaning. 
2141  * \par
2142  * An example application illustrating the use of this interface, showcasing
2143  * code from both server and client sides, appears in the following chapter. 
2144  * 
2145  *      \section sec5-2 Section 5.2: Constants 
2146  * 
2147  * \par
2148  * This section covers the basic constant definitions of interest to the Rx
2149  * application programmer. Each subsection is devoted to describing the
2150  * constants falling into the following categories: 
2151  * \li Configuration quantities 
2152  * \li Waiting options 
2153  * \li Connection ID operations 
2154  * \li Connection flags 
2155  * \li Connection types 
2156  * \li Call states 
2157  * \li Call flags 
2158  * \li Call modes 
2159  * \li Packet header flags 
2160  * \li Packet sizes 
2161  * \li Packet types 
2162  * \li Packet classes 
2163  * \li Conditions prompting ack packets 
2164  * \li Ack types 
2165  * \li Error codes 
2166  * \li Debugging values 
2167  * \par
2168  * An attempt has been made to relate these constant definitions to the objects
2169  * or routines that utilize them. 
2170  * 
2171  *      \subsection sec5-2-1 Section 5.2.1: Configuration Quantities 
2172  * 
2173  * \par
2174  * These definitions provide some basic Rx configuration parameters, including
2175  * the number of simultaneous calls that may be handled on a single connection,
2176  * lightweight thread parameters, and timeouts for various operations. 
2177  * 
2178  * \par Name 
2179  * RX IDLE DEAD TIME
2180  * \par Value 
2181  * 60
2182  * \par Description
2183  * Default idle dead time for connections, in seconds.
2184  * 
2185  * \par Name 
2186  * RX MAX SERVICES
2187  * \par Value 
2188  * 20
2189  * \par Description
2190  * The maximum number of Rx services that may be installed within one
2191  * application.
2192  * 
2193  * \par Name 
2194  * RX PROCESS MAXCALLS
2195  * \par Value 
2196  * 4
2197  * \par Description
2198  * The maximum number of asynchronous calls active simultaneously on any given
2199  * Rx connection.  This value must be set to a power of two.
2200  * 
2201  * \par Name 
2202  * RX DEFAULT STACK SIZE
2203  * \par Value 
2204  * 16,000
2205  * \par Description
2206  * Default lightweight thread stack size, measured in bytes.  This value may be
2207  * overridden by calling the rx_SetStackSize() macro.
2208  * 
2209  * \par Name 
2210  * RX PROCESS PRIORITY
2211  * \par Value 
2212  * LWP NORMAL PRIORITY
2213  * \par Description
2214  * This is the priority under which an Rx thread should run.  There should not
2215  * generally be any reason to change this setting.
2216  * 
2217  * \par Name 
2218  * RX CHALLENGE TIMEOUT
2219  * \par Value 
2220  * 2
2221  * \par Description
2222  * The number of seconds before another authentication request packet is
2223  * generated.
2224  * 
2225  * \par Name 
2226  * RX MAXACKS
2227  * \par Value 
2228  * 255
2229  * \par Description
2230  * Maximum number of individual acknowledgements that may be carried in an Rx
2231  * acknowledgement packet.
2232  * 
2233  *      \subsection sec5-2-2 Section 5.2.2: Waiting Options 
2234  * 
2235  * \par
2236  * These definitions provide readable values indicating whether an operation
2237  * should block when packet buffer resources are not available. 
2238  * 
2239  * \par Name 
2240  * RX DONTWAIT
2241  * \par Value 
2242  * 0
2243  * \par Description
2244  * Wait until the associated operation completes.
2245  * 
2246  * \par Name 
2247  * RX WAIT
2248  * \par Value 
2249  * 1
2250  * \par Description
2251  * Don't wait if the associated operation would block.
2252  * 
2253  *      \subsection sec5-2-3 Section 5.2.3: Connection ID Operations 
2254  * 
2255  * \par
2256  * These values assist in extracting the call channel number from a connection
2257  * identifier. A call channel is the index of a particular asynchronous call
2258  * structure within a single Rx connection. 
2259  * 
2260  * \par Name 
2261  * RX CIDSHIFT
2262  * \par Value 
2263  * 2
2264  * \par Description
2265  * Number of bits to right-shift to isolate a connection ID.  Must be set to
2266  * the log (base two) of RX MAXCALLS.
2267  * 
2268  * \par Name 
2269  * RX CHANNELMASK
2270  * \par Value 
2271  * (RX MAXCALLS-1)
2272  * \par Description
2273  * Mask used to isolate a call channel from a connection ID field.
2274  * 
2275  * \par Name 
2276  * RX CIDMASK
2277  * \par Value 
2278  * (~RX CHANNELMASK)
2279  * \par Description
2280  * Mask used to isolate the connection ID from its field, masking out the call
2281  * channel information.
2282  * 
2283  *      \subsection sec5-2-4 Section 5.2.4: Connection Flags 
2284  * 
2285  * \par
2286  * The values defined here appear in the flags field of Rx connections, as
2287  * defined by the rx connection structure described in Section 5.3.2.2. 
2288  * 
2289  * \par Name 
2290  * RX CONN MAKECALL WAITING
2291  * \par Value 
2292  * 1
2293  * \par Description
2294  * rx MakeCall() is waiting for a channel.
2295  * 
2296  * \par Name 
2297  * RX CONN DESTROY ME
2298  * \par Value 
2299  * 2
2300  * \par Description
2301  * Destroy this (client) connection after its last call completes.
2302  * 
2303  * \par Name 
2304  * RX CONN USING PACKET CKSUM
2305  * \par Value 
2306  * 4
2307  * \par Description
2308  * This packet is using security-related check-summing (a non-zero header,
2309  * spare field has been seen.)
2310  * 
2311  *      \subsection sec5-2-5 Section 5.2.5: Connection Types 
2312  * 
2313  * \par
2314  * Rx stores different information in its connection structures, depending on
2315  * whether the given connection represents the server side (the one providing
2316  * the service) or the client side (the one requesting the service) of the
2317  * protocol. The type field within the connection structure (described in
2318  * Section 5.3.2.2) takes on the following values to differentiate the two
2319  * types of connections, and identifies the fields that are active within the
2320  * connection structure. 
2321  * 
2322  * \par Name 
2323  * RX CLIENT CONNECTION
2324  * \par Value 
2325  * 0
2326  * \par Description
2327  * This is a client-side connection.
2328  * 
2329  * \par Name 
2330  * CONNECTION
2331  * \par Value 
2332  * 1
2333  * \par Description
2334  * This is a server-side connection.
2335  * 
2336  *      \subsection sec5-2-6 Section 5.2.6: Call States 
2337  * 
2338  * \par
2339  * An Rx call on a particular connection may be in one of several states at any
2340  * instant in time. The following definitions identify the range of states that
2341  * a call may assume. 
2342  * 
2343  * \par Name 
2344  * RX STATE NOTINIT
2345  * \par Value 
2346  * 0
2347  * \par Description
2348  * The call structure has never been used, and is thus still completely
2349  * uninitialized.
2350  * 
2351  * \par Name 
2352  * RX STATE PRECALL
2353  * \par Value 
2354  * 1
2355  * \par Description
2356  * A call is not yet in progress, but packets have arrived for it anyway.  This
2357  * only applies to calls within server-side connections.
2358  * 
2359  * \par Name 
2360  * RX STATE ACTIVE
2361  * \par Value 
2362  * 2
2363  * \par Description
2364  * This call is fully active, having an attached lightweight thread operating
2365  * on its behalf.
2366  * 
2367  * \par Name 
2368  * RX STATE DAILY
2369  * \par Value 
2370  * 3
2371  * \par Description
2372  * The call structure is "dallying" after its lightweight thread has completed
2373  * its most recent call.  This is a "hot-standby" condition, where the call
2374  * structure preserves state from the previous call and thus optimizes the
2375  * arrival of further, related calls.
2376  * 
2377  *      \subsection sec5-2-7 Section 5.2.7: Call Flags: 
2378  * 
2379  * \par
2380  * These values are used within the flags field of a variable declared to be of
2381  * type struct rx call, as described in Section 5.3.2.4. They provide
2382  * additional information as to the state of the given Rx call, such as the
2383  * type of event for which it is waiting (if any) and whether or not all
2384  * incoming packets have been received in support of the call. 
2385  * 
2386  * \par Name 
2387  * RX CALL READER WAIT
2388  * \par Value 
2389  * 1
2390  * \par Description
2391  * Reader is waiting for next packet.
2392  * 
2393  * \par Name 
2394  * RX CALL WAIT WINDOW ALLOC
2395  * \par Value 
2396  * 2
2397  * \par Description
2398  * Sender is waiting for a window so that it can allocate buffers.
2399  * 
2400  * \par Name 
2401  * RX CALL WAIT WINDOW SEND
2402  * \par Value 
2403  * 4
2404  * \par Description
2405  * Sender is waiting for a window so that it can send buffers.
2406  * 
2407  * \par Name 
2408  * RX CALL WAIT PACKETS
2409  * \par Value 
2410  * 8
2411  * \par Description
2412  * Sender is waiting for packet buffers.
2413  * 
2414  * \par Name 
2415  * RX CALL RECEIVE DONE
2416  * \par Value 
2417  * 16
2418  * \par Description
2419  * The call is waiting for a lightweight thread to be assigned to the operation
2420  * it has just received.
2421  * 
2422  * \par Name 
2423  * RX CALL RECEIVE DONE 
2424  * \par Value 
2425  * 32
2426  * \par Description
2427  * All packets have been received on this call.
2428  * 
2429  * \par Name 
2430  * RX CALL CLEARED
2431  * \par Value 
2432  * 64
2433  * \par Description
2434  * The receive queue has been cleared when in precall state.
2435  * 
2436  *      \subsection sec5-2-8 Section 5.2.8: Call Modes 
2437  * 
2438  * \par
2439  * These values define the modes of an Rx call when it is in the RX STATE
2440  * ACTIVE state, having a lightweight thread assigned to it. 
2441  * 
2442  * \par Name 
2443  * RX MODE SENDING
2444  * \par Value 
2445  * 1
2446  * \par Description
2447  * We are sending or ready to send.
2448  * 
2449  * \par Name 
2450  * RX MODE RECEIVING
2451  * \par Value 
2452  * 2
2453  * \par Description
2454  * We are receiving or ready to receive.
2455  * 
2456  * \par Name 
2457  * RX MODE ERROR
2458  * \par Value 
2459  * 3
2460  * \par Description
2461  * Something went wrong in the current conversation.
2462  * 
2463  * \par Name 
2464  * RX MODE EOF
2465  * \par Value 
2466  * 4
2467  * \par Description
2468  * The server side has flushed (or the client side has read) the last reply
2469  * packet.
2470  * 
2471  *      \subsection sec5-2-9 Section 5.2.9: Packet Header Flags 
2472  * 
2473  * \par
2474  * Rx packets carry a flag field in their headers, providing additional
2475  * information regarding the packet's contents. The Rx packet header's flag
2476  * field's bits may take the following values: 
2477  * 
2478  * \par Name 
2479  * RX CLIENT INITIATED
2480  * \par Value 
2481  * 1
2482  * \par Description
2483  * Signifies that a packet has been sent/received from the client side of the
2484  * call.
2485  * 
2486  * \par Name 
2487  * RX REQUEST ACK
2488  * \par Value 
2489  * 2
2490  * \par Description
2491  * The Rx calls' peer entity requests an acknowledgement.
2492  * 
2493  * \par Name 
2494  * RX LAST PACKET
2495  * \par Value 
2496  * 4
2497  * \par Description
2498  * This is the final packet from this side of the call.
2499  * 
2500  * \par Name 
2501  * RX MORE PACKETS
2502  * \par Value 
2503  * 8
2504  * \par Description
2505  * There are more packets following this, i.e., the next sequence number seen
2506  * by the receiver should be greater than this one, rather than a
2507  * retransmission of an earlier sequence number.
2508  * 
2509  * \par Name 
2510  * RX PRESET FLAGS
2511  * \par Value 
2512  * (RX CLIENT INITIATED | RX LAST PACKET)
2513  * \par Description
2514  * This flag is preset once per Rx packet.  It doesn't change on retransmission
2515  * of the packet.
2516  * 
2517  *      \subsection sec5-3-10 Section 5.2.10: Packet Sizes 
2518  * 
2519  * \par
2520  * These values provide sizing information on the various regions within Rx
2521  * packets. These packet sections include the IP/UDP headers and bodies as well
2522  * Rx header and bodies. Also covered are such values as different maximum
2523  * packet sizes depending on whether they are targeted to peers on the same
2524  * local network or a more far-flung network. Note that the MTU term appearing
2525  * below is an abbreviation for Maximum Transmission Unit. 
2526  * 
2527  * \par Name 
2528  * RX IPUDP SIZE
2529  * \par Value 
2530  * 28
2531  * \par Description
2532  * The number of bytes taken up by IP/UDP headers.
2533  * 
2534  * \par Name 
2535  * RX MAX PACKET SIZE
2536  * \par Value 
2537  * (1500 - RX IPUDP SIZE)
2538  * \par Description
2539  * This is the Ethernet MTU minus IP and UDP header sizes.
2540  * 
2541  * \par Name 
2542  * RX HEADER SIZE
2543  * \par Value 
2544  * sizeof (struct rx header)
2545  * \par Description
2546  * The number of bytes in an Rx packet header.
2547  * 
2548  * \par Name 
2549  * RX MAX PACKET DATA SIZE
2550  * \par Value 
2551  * (RX MAX PACKET SIZE RX - HEADER SIZE)
2552  * \par Description
2553  * Maximum size in bytes of the user data in a packet.
2554  * 
2555  * \par Name 
2556  * RX LOCAL PACKET SIZE
2557  * \par Value 
2558  * RX MAX PACKET SIZE
2559  * \par Description
2560  * Packet size in bytes to use when being sent to a host on the same net.
2561  * 
2562  * \par Name 
2563  * RX REMOTE PACKET SIZE
2564  * \par Value 
2565  * (576 - RX IPUDP SIZE)
2566  * \par Description
2567  * Packet size in bytes to use when being sent to a host on a different net.
2568  * 
2569  *      \subsection sec5-2-11 Section 5.2.11: Packet Types 
2570  * 
2571  * \par
2572  * The following values are used in the packetType field within a struct rx
2573  * packet, and define the different roles assumed by Rx packets. These roles
2574  * include user data packets, different flavors of acknowledgements, busies,
2575  * aborts, authentication challenges and responses, and debugging vehicles. 
2576  * 
2577  * \par Name 
2578  * RX PACKET TYPE DATA
2579  * \par Value 
2580  * 1
2581  * \par Description
2582  * A user data packet.
2583  * 
2584  * \par Name 
2585  * RX PACKET TYPE ACK
2586  * \par Value 
2587  * 2
2588  * \par Description
2589  * Acknowledgement packet.
2590  * 
2591  * \par Name 
2592  * RX PACKET TYPE BUSY
2593  * \par Value 
2594  * 3
2595  * \par Description
2596  * Busy packet.  The server-side entity cannot accept the call at the moment,
2597  * but the requestor is encouraged to try again later.
2598  * 
2599  * \par Name 
2600  * RX PACKET TYPE ABORT 
2601  * \par Value 
2602  * 4
2603  * \par Description
2604  * Abort packet. No response is needed for this packet type.
2605  * 
2606  * \par Name 
2607  * RX PACKET TYPE ACKALL
2608  * \par Value 
2609  * 5
2610  * \par Description
2611  * Acknowledges receipt of all packets on a call.
2612  * 
2613  * \par Name 
2614  * RX PACKET TYPE CHALLENGE
2615  * \par Value 
2616  * 6
2617  * \par Description
2618  * Challenge the client's identity, requesting credentials.
2619  * 
2620  * \par Name 
2621  * RX PACKET TYPE RESPONSE
2622  * \par Value 
2623  * 7
2624  * \par Description
2625  * Response to a RX PACKET TYPE CHALLENGE authentication challenge packet.
2626  * 
2627  * \par Name 
2628  * RX PACKET TYPE DEBUG
2629  * \par Value 
2630  * 8
2631  * \par Description
2632  * Request for debugging information.
2633  * 
2634  * \par Name 
2635  * RX N PACKET TYPES
2636  * \par Value 
2637  * 9
2638  * \par Description
2639  * The number of Rx packet types defined above.  Note that it also includes
2640  * packet type 0 (which is unused) in the count.
2641  * 
2642  * \par
2643  * The RX PACKET TYPES definition provides a mapping of the above values to
2644  * human-readable string names, and is exported by the rx packetTypes variable
2645  * catalogued in Section 5.4.9. 
2646  * 
2647  * \code 
2648  * {
2649  *      "data", 
2650  *      "ack", 
2651  *      "busy", 
2652  *      "abort", 
2653  *      "ackall", 
2654  *      "challenge", 
2655  *      "response", 
2656  *      "debug" 
2657  * } 
2658  * \endcode
2659  * 
2660  *      \subsection sec5-2-12 Section 5.2.12: Packet Classes 
2661  * 
2662  * \par
2663  * These definitions are used internally to manage alloction of Rx packet
2664  * buffers according to quota classifications. Each packet belongs to one of
2665  * the following classes, and its buffer is derived from the corresponding
2666  * pool. 
2667  * 
2668  * \par Name 
2669  * RX PACKET CLASS RECEIVE
2670  * \par Value 
2671  * 0
2672  * \par Description
2673  * Receive packet for user data.
2674  * 
2675  * \par Name 
2676  * RX PACKET CLASS SEND
2677  * \par Value 
2678  * 1
2679  * \par Description
2680  * Send packet for user data.
2681  * 
2682  * \par Name 
2683  * RX PACKET CLASS SPECIAL
2684  * \par Value 
2685  * 2
2686  * \par Description
2687  * A special packet that does not hold user data, such as an acknowledgement or
2688  * authentication challenge.
2689  * 
2690  * \par Name 
2691  * RX N PACKET CLASSES
2692  * \par Value 
2693  * 3
2694  * \par Description
2695  * The number of Rx packet classes defined above.
2696  * 
2697  *      \subsection sec5-2-13 Section 5.2.13: Conditions Prompting Ack Packets 
2698  * 
2699  * \par
2700  * Rx acknowledgement packets are constructed and sent by the protocol
2701  * according to the following reasons. These values appear in the Rx packet
2702  * header of the ack packet itself. 
2703  * 
2704  * \par Name 
2705  * RX ACK REQUESTED
2706  * \par Value 
2707  * 1
2708  * \par Description
2709  * The peer has explicitly requested an ack on this packet.
2710  * 
2711  * \par Name 
2712  * RX ACK DUPLICATE
2713  * \par Value 
2714  * 2
2715  * \par Description
2716  * A duplicate packet has been received.
2717  * 
2718  * \par Name 
2719  * RX ACK OUT OF SEQUENCE
2720  * \par Value 
2721  * 3
2722  * \par Description
2723  * A packet has arrived out of sequence.
2724  * 
2725  * \par Name 
2726  * RX ACK EXCEEDS WINDOW
2727  * \par Value 
2728  * 4
2729  * \par Description
2730  * A packet sequence number higher than maximum value allowed by the call's
2731  * window has been received.
2732  * 
2733  * \par Name 
2734  * RX ACK NOSPACE
2735  * \par Value 
2736  * 5
2737  * \par Description
2738  * No packet buffer space is available.
2739  * 
2740  * \par Name 
2741  * RX ACK PING
2742  * \par Value 
2743  * 6
2744  * \par Description
2745  * Acknowledgement for keep-alive purposes.
2746  * 
2747  * \par Name 
2748  * RX ACK PING RESPONSE
2749  * \par Value 
2750  * 7
2751  * \par Description
2752  * Response to a RX ACK PING packet.
2753  * 
2754  * \par Name 
2755  * RX ACK DELAY
2756  * \par Value 
2757  * 8
2758  * \par Description
2759  * An ack generated due to a period of inactivity after normal packet
2760  * receptions.
2761  * 
2762  *      \subsection 5-2-14 Section 5.2.14: Acknowledgement Types 
2763  * 
2764  * \par
2765  * These are the set of values placed into the acks array in an Rx
2766  * acknowledgement packet, whose data format is defined by struct rx ackPacket.
2767  * These definitions are used to convey positive or negative acknowledgements
2768  * for a given range of packets. 
2769  * 
2770  * \par Name 
2771  * RX ACK TYPE NACK
2772  * \par Value 
2773  * 0
2774  * \par Description
2775  * Receiver doesn't currently have the associated packet; it may never hae been
2776  * received, or received and then later dropped before processing.
2777  * 
2778  * \par Name 
2779  * RX ACK TYPE ACK
2780  * \par Value 
2781  * 1
2782  * \par Description
2783  * Receiver has the associated packet queued, although it may later decide to
2784  * discard it.
2785  * 
2786  *      \subsection sec5-2-15 Section 5.2.15: Error Codes 
2787  * 
2788  * \par
2789  * Rx employs error codes ranging from -1 to -64. The Rxgen stub generator may
2790  * use other error codes less than -64. User programs calling on Rx, on the
2791  * other hand, are expected to return positive error codes. A return value of
2792  * zero is interpreted as an indication that the given operation completed
2793  * successfully. 
2794  * 
2795  * \par Name 
2796  * RX CALL DEAD
2797  * \par Value 
2798  * -1
2799  * \par Description
2800  * A connection has been inactive past Rx's tolerance levels and has been shut
2801  * down.
2802  * 
2803  * \par Name 
2804  * RX INVALID OPERATION
2805  * \par Value 
2806  * -2
2807  * \par Description
2808  * An invalid operation has been attempted, including such protocol errors as
2809  * having a client-side call send data after having received the beginning of a
2810  * reply from its server-side peer.
2811  * 
2812  * \par Name 
2813  * RX CALL TIMEOUT
2814  * \par Value 
2815  * -3
2816  * \par Description
2817  * The (optional) timeout value placed on this call has been exceeded (see
2818  * Sections 5.5.3.4 and 5.6.5).
2819  * 
2820  * \par Name 
2821  * RX EOF
2822  * \par Value 
2823  * -4
2824  * \par Description
2825  * Unexpected end of data on a read operation.
2826  * 
2827  * \par Name 
2828  * RX PROTOCOL ERROR
2829  * \par Value 
2830  * -5
2831  * \par Description
2832  * An unspecified low-level Rx protocol error has occurred.
2833  * 
2834  * \par Name 
2835  * RX USER ABORT
2836  * \par Value 
2837  * -6
2838  * \par Description
2839  * A generic user abort code, used when no more specific error code needs to be
2840  * communicated.  For example, Rx clients employing the multicast feature (see
2841  * Section 1.2.8) take advantage of this error code.
2842  * 
2843  *      \subsection sec5-2-16 Section 5.2.16: Debugging Values 
2844  * 
2845  * \par
2846  * Rx provides a set of data collections that convey information about its
2847  * internal status and performance. The following values have been defined in
2848  * support of this debugging and statistics-collection feature. 
2849  * 
2850  *      \subsubsection sec5-3-16-1 Section 5.2.16.1: Version Information 
2851  * 
2852  * \par
2853  * Various versions of the Rx debugging/statistics interface are in existance,
2854  * each defining different data collections and handling certain bugs. Each Rx
2855  * facility is stamped with a version number of its debugging/statistics
2856  * interface, allowing its clients to tailor their requests to the precise data
2857  * collections that are supported by a particular Rx entity, and to properly
2858  * interpret the data formats received through this interface. All existing Rx
2859  * implementations should be at revision M. 
2860  * 
2861  * \par Name 
2862  * RX DEBUGI VERSION MINIMUM
2863  * \par Value 
2864  * 'L'
2865  * \par Description
2866  * The earliest version of Rx statistics available.
2867  * 
2868  * \par Name 
2869  * RX DEBUGI VERSION
2870  * \par Value 
2871  * 'M'
2872  * \par Description
2873  * The latest version of Rx statistics available.
2874  * 
2875  * \par Name 
2876  * RX DEBUGI VERSION W SECSTATS
2877  * \par Value 
2878  * 'L'
2879  * \par Description
2880  * Identifies the earliest version in which statistics concerning Rx security
2881  * objects is available.
2882  * 
2883  * \par Name 
2884  * RX DEBUGI VERSION W GETALLCONN
2885  * \par Value 
2886  * 'M'
2887  * \par Description
2888  * The first version that supports getting information about all current Rx
2889  * connections, as specified y the RX DEBUGI GETALLCONN debugging request
2890  * packet opcode described below.
2891  * 
2892  * \par Name 
2893  * RX DEBUGI VERSION W RXSTATS
2894  * \par Value 
2895  * 'M'
2896  * \par Description
2897  * The first version that supports getting all the Rx statistics in one
2898  * operation, as specified by the RX DEBUGI RXSTATS debugging request packet
2899  * opcode described below.
2900  * 
2901  * \par Name 
2902  * RX DEBUGI VERSION W UNALIGNED CONN
2903  * \par Value 
2904  * 'L'
2905  * \par Description
2906  * There was an alignment problem discovered when returning Rx connection
2907  * information in older versions of this debugging/statistics interface.  This
2908  * identifies the last version that exhibited this alignment problem.
2909  * 
2910  *      \subsubsection sec5-2-16-2 Section 5.2.16.2: Opcodes 
2911  * 
2912  * \par
2913  * When requesting debugging/statistics information, the caller specifies one
2914  * of the following supported data collections: 
2915  * 
2916  * \par Name 
2917  * RX DEBUGI GETSTATS
2918  * \par Value 
2919  * 1
2920  * \par Description
2921  * Get basic Rx statistics.
2922  * 
2923  * \par Name 
2924  * RX DEBUGI GETCONN
2925  * \par Value 
2926  * 2
2927  * \par Description
2928  * Get information on all Rx connections considered "interesting" (as defined
2929  * below), and no others.
2930  * 
2931  * \par Name 
2932  * RX DEBUGI GETALLCONN
2933  * \par Value 
2934  * 3
2935  * \par Description
2936  * Get information on all existing Rx connection structures, even
2937  * "uninteresting" ones.
2938  * 
2939  * \par Name 
2940  * RX DEBUGI RXSTATS
2941  * \par Value 
2942  * 4
2943  * \par Description
2944  * Get all available Rx stats.
2945  * 
2946  * \par
2947  * An Rx connection is considered "interesting" if it is waiting for a call
2948  * channel to free up or if it has been marked for destruction. If neither is
2949  * true, a connection is still considered interesting if any of its call
2950  * channels is actively handling a call or in its preparatory pre-call state.
2951  * Failing all the above conditions, a connection is still tagged as
2952  * interesting if any of its call channels is in either of the RX MODE SENDING
2953  * or RX MODE RECEIVING modes, which are not allowed when the call is not
2954  * active. 
2955  * 
2956  *      \subsubsection sec5-2-16-3 Section 5.2.16.3: Queuing 
2957  * 
2958  * \par
2959  * These two queueing-related values indicate whether packets are present on
2960  * the incoming and outgoing packet queues for a given Rx call. These values
2961  * are only used in support of debugging and statistics-gathering operations. 
2962  * 
2963  * \par Name 
2964  * RX OTHER IN
2965  * \par Value 
2966  * 1
2967  * \par Description
2968  * Packets available in in queue.
2969  * 
2970  * \par Name 
2971  * RX OTHER OUT 
2972  * \par Value 
2973  * 2
2974  * \par Description
2975  * Packets available in out queue.
2976  * 
2977  *      \section sec5-3 Section 5.3: Structures 
2978  * 
2979  * \par
2980  * This section describes the major exported Rx data structures of interest to
2981  * application programmers. The following categories are utilized for the
2982  * purpose of organizing the structure descriptions: 
2983  * \li Security objects 
2984  * \li Protocol objects 
2985  * \li Packet formats 
2986  * \li Debugging and statistics 
2987  * \li Miscellaneous 
2988  * \par
2989  * Please note that many fields described in this section are declared to be
2990  * VOID. This is defined to be char, and is used to get around some compiler
2991  * limitations. 
2992  *      \subsection sec5-3-1 Section 5.3.1: Security Objects 
2993  * 
2994  * \par
2995  * As explained in Section 1.2.1, Rx provides a modular, extensible security
2996  * model. This allows Rx applications to either use one of the built-in
2997  * security/authentication protocol packages or write and plug in one of their
2998  * own. This section examines the various structural components used by Rx to
2999  * support generic security and authentication modules. 
3000  * 
3001  *      \subsubsection sec5-3-1-1 Section 5.3.1.1: struct rx securityOps 
3002  * 
3003  * \par
3004  * As previously described, each Rx security object must export a fixed set of
3005  * interface functions, providing the full set of operations defined on the
3006  * object. The rx securityOps structure defines the array of functions
3007  * comprising this interface. The Rx facility calls these routines at the
3008  * appropriate times, without knowing the specifics of how any particular
3009  * security object implements the operation. 
3010  * \par
3011  * A complete description of these interface functions, including information
3012  * regarding their exact purpose, parameters, and calling conventions, may be
3013  * found in Section 5.5.7. 
3014  * \par
3015  * \b fields 
3016  * \li int (*op Close)() - React to the disposal of a security object. 
3017  * \li int (*op NewConnection)() - Invoked each time a new Rx connection
3018  * utilizing the associated security object is created. 
3019  * \li int (*op PreparePacket)() - Invoked each time an outgoing Rx packet is
3020  * created and sent on a connection using the given security object. 
3021  * \li int (*op SendPacket)() - Called each time a packet belonging to a call
3022  * in a connection using the security object is physically transmitted. 
3023  * \li int (*op CheckAuthentication)() - This function is executed each time it
3024  * is necessary to check whether authenticated calls are being perfomed on a
3025  * connection using the associated security object. 
3026  * \li int (*op CreateChallenge)() - Invoked each time a server-side challenge
3027  * event is created by Rx, namely when the identity of the principal associated
3028  * with the peer process must be determined. 
3029  * \li int (*op GetChallenge)() - Called each time a client-side packet is
3030  * constructed in response to an authentication challenge. 
3031  * \li int (*op GetResponse)() - Executed each time a response to a challenge
3032  * event must be received on the server side of a connection. 
3033  * \li int (*op CheckResponse)() - Invoked each time a response to an
3034  * authentication has been received, validating the response and pulling out
3035  * the required authentication information. 
3036  * \li int (*op CheckPacket) () - Invoked each time an Rx packet has been
3037  * received, making sure that the packet is properly formatted and that it
3038  * hasn't been altered. 
3039  * \li int (*op DestroyConnection)() - Called each time an Rx connection
3040  * employing the given security object is destroyed. 
3041  * \li int (*op GetStats)() - Executed each time a request for statistics on
3042  * the given security object has been received. 
3043  * \li int (*op Spare1)()-int (*op Spare3)() - Three spare function slots,
3044  * reserved for future use. 
3045  * 
3046  *      \subsubsection sec5-3-1-2 Section 5.2.1.2: struct rx securityClass 
3047  * 
3048  * \par
3049  * Variables of type struct rx securityClass are used to represent
3050  * instantiations of a particular security model employed by Rx. It consists of
3051  * a pointer to the set of interface operations implementing the given security
3052  * object, along with a pointer to private storage as necessary to support its
3053  * operations. These security objects are also reference-counted, tracking the
3054  * number of Rx connections in existance that use the given security object. If
3055  * the reference count drops to zero, the security module may garbage-collect
3056  * the space taken by the unused security object. 
3057  * \par
3058  * \b fields 
3059  * \li struct rx securityOps *ops - Pointer to the array of interface functions
3060  * for the security object. 
3061  * \li VOID *privateData - Pointer to a region of storage used by the security
3062  * object to support its operations. 
3063  * \li int refCount - A reference count on the security object, tracking the
3064  * number of Rx connections employing this model. 
3065  * 
3066  *      \subsubsection sec5-3-1-3 Section 5.3.1.3: struct rx
3067  *      securityObjectStats 
3068  * 
3069  * \par
3070  * This structure is used to report characteristics for an instantiation of a
3071  * security object on a particular Rx connection, as well as performance
3072  * figures for that object. It is used by the debugging portions of the Rx
3073  * package. Every security object defines and manages fields such as level and
3074  * flags differently. 
3075  * \par
3076  * \b fields 
3077  * \li char type - The type of security object being implemented. Existing
3078  * values are: 
3079  * \li 0: The null security package. 
3080  * \li 1: An obsolete Kerberos-like security object. 
3081  * \li 2: The rxkad discipline (see Chapter 3). 
3082  * \li char level - The level at which encryption is utilized. 
3083  * \li char sparec[10] - Used solely for alignment purposes. 
3084  * \li long flags - Status flags regarding aspects of the connection relating
3085  * to the security object. 
3086  * \li u long expires - Absolute time when the authentication information
3087  * cached by the given connection expires. A value of zero indicates that the
3088  * associated authentication information is valid for all time. 
3089  * \li u long packetsReceived - Number of packets received on this particular
3090  * connection, and thus the number of incoming packets handled by the
3091  * associated security object. 
3092  * \li u long packetsSent - Number of packets sent on this particular
3093  * connection, and thus the number of outgoing packets handled by the
3094  * associated security object. 
3095  * \li u long bytesReceived - Overall number of "payload" bytes received (i.e.,
3096  * packet bytes not associated with IP headers, UDP headers, and the security
3097  * module's own header and trailer regions) on this connection. 
3098  * \li u long bytesSent - Overall number of "payload" bytes sent (i.e., packet
3099  * bytes not associated with IP headers, UDP headers, and the security module's
3100  * own header and trailer regions) on this connection. 
3101  * \li short spares[4] - Several shortword spares, reserved for future use. 
3102  * \li long sparel[8] - Several longword spares, reserved for future use. 
3103  * 
3104  *      \subsection sec5-3-2 Section 5.3.2: Protocol Objects 
3105  * 
3106  * \par
3107  * The structures describing the main abstractions and entities provided by Rx,
3108  * namely services, peers, connections and calls are covered in this section. 
3109  * 
3110  *      \subsubsection sec5-3-2-1 Section 5.3.2.1: struct rx service 
3111  * 
3112  * \par
3113  * An Rx-based server exports services, or specific RPC interfaces that
3114  * accomplish certain tasks. Services are identified by (host-address,
3115  * UDP-port, serviceID) triples. An Rx service is installed and initialized on
3116  * a given host through the use of the rx NewService() routine (See Section
3117  * 5.6.3). Incoming calls are stamped with the Rx service type, and must match
3118  * an installed service to be accepted. Internally, Rx services also carry
3119  * string names for purposes of identification. These strings are useful to
3120  * remote debugging and statistics-gathering programs. The use of a service ID
3121  * allows a single server process to export multiple, independently-specified
3122  * Rx RPC services. 
3123  * \par
3124  * Each Rx service contains one or more security classes, as implemented by
3125  * individual security objects. These security objects implement end-to-end
3126  * security protocols. Individual peer-to-peer connections established on
3127  * behalf of an Rx service will select exactly one of the supported security
3128  * objects to define the authentication procedures followed by all calls
3129  * associated with the connection. Applications are not limited to using only
3130  * the core set of built-in security objects offered by Rx. They are free to
3131  * define their own security objects in order to execute the specific protocols
3132  * they require. 
3133  * \par
3134  * It is possible to specify both the minimum and maximum number of lightweight
3135  * processes available to handle simultaneous calls directed to an Rx service.
3136  * In addition, certain procedures may be registered with the service and
3137  * called at set times in the course of handling an RPC request. 
3138  * \par
3139  * \b fields 
3140  * \li u short serviceId - The associated service number. 
3141  * \li u short servicePort - The chosen UDP port for this service. 
3142  * \li char *serviceName - The human-readable service name, expressed as a
3143  * character 
3144  * \li string. osi socket socket - The socket structure or file descriptor used
3145  * by this service. 
3146  * \li u short nSecurityObjects - The number of entries in the array of
3147  * supported security objects. 
3148  * \li struct rx securityClass **securityObjects - The array of pointers to the
3149  * ser
3150  * vice's security class objects. 
3151  * \li long (*executeRequestProc)() - A pointer to the routine to call when an
3152  * RPC request is received for this service. 
3153  * \li VOID (*destroyConnProc)() - A pointer to the routine to call when one of
3154  * the server-side connections associated with this service is destroyed. 
3155  * \li VOID (*newConnProc)() - A pointer to the routine to call when a
3156  * server-side connection associated with this service is created. 
3157  * \li VOID (*beforeProc)() - A pointer to the routine to call before an
3158  * individual RPC call on one of this service's connections is executed. 
3159  * \li VOID (*afterProc)() - A pointer to the routine to call after an
3160  * individual RPC call on one of this service's connections is executed. 
3161  * \li short nRequestsRunning - The number of simultaneous RPC calls currently
3162  * in progress for this service. 
3163  * \li short maxProcs - This field has two meanings. first, maxProcs limits the
3164  * total number of requests that may execute in parallel for any one service.
3165  * It also guarantees that this many requests may be handled in parallel if
3166  * there are no active calls for any other service. 
3167  * \li short minProcs - The minimum number of lightweight threads (hence
3168  * requests) guaranteed to be simultaneously executable. 
3169  * \li short connDeadTime - The number of seconds until a client of this
3170  * service will be declared to be dead, if it is not responding to the RPC
3171  * protocol. 
3172  * \li short idleDeadTime - The number of seconds a server-side connection for
3173  * this service will wait for packet I/O to resume after a quiescent period
3174  * before the connection is marked as dead. 
3175  * 
3176  *      \subsubsection sec5-3-2-2 Section 5.3.2.2: struct rx connection 
3177  * 
3178  * \par
3179  * An Rx connection represents an authenticated communication path, allowing
3180  * multiple asynchronous conversations (calls). Each connection is identified
3181  * by a connection ID. The low-order bits of the connection ID are reserved so
3182  * they may be stamped with the index of a particular call channel. With up to
3183  * RX MAXCALLS concurrent calls (set to 4 in this implementation), the bottom
3184  * two bits are set aside for this purpose. The connection ID is not sufficient
3185  * by itself to uniquely identify an Rx connection. Should a client crash and
3186  * restart, it may reuse a connection ID, causing inconsistent results. In
3187  * addition to the connection ID, the epoch, or start time for the client side
3188  * of the connection, is used to identify a connection. Should the above
3189  * scenario occur, a different epoch value will be chosen by the client,
3190  * differentiating this incarnation from the orphaned connection record on the
3191  * server side. 
3192  * \par
3193  * Each connection is associated with a parent service, which defines a set of
3194  * supported security models. At creation time, an Rx connection selects the
3195  * particular security protocol it will implement, referencing the associated
3196  * service. The connection structure maintains state about the individual calls
3197  * being simultaneously handled. 
3198  * \par
3199  * \b fields 
3200  * \li struct rx connection *next - Used for internal queueing. 
3201  * \li struct rx peer *peer - Pointer to the connection's peer information (see
3202  * below). 
3203  * \li u long epoch - Process start time of the client side of the connection. 
3204  * \li u long cid - Connection identifier. The call channel (i.e., the index
3205  * into the connection's array of call structures) may appear in the bottom
3206  * bits. 
3207  * \li VOID *rock - Pointer to an arbitrary region of memory in support of the
3208  * connection's operation. The contents of this area are opaque to the Rx
3209  * facility in general, but are understood by any special routines used by this
3210  * connection. 
3211  * \li struct rx call *call[RX MAXCALLS] - Pointer to the call channel
3212  * structures, describing up to RX MAXCALLS concurrent calls on this
3213  * connection. 
3214  * \li u long callNumber[RX MAXCALLS] - The set of current call numbers on each
3215  * of the call channels. 
3216  * \li int timeout - Obsolete; no longer used. 
3217  * \li u char flags - Various states of the connection; see Section 5.2.4 for
3218  * individual bit definitions. 
3219  * \li u char type - Whether the connection is a server-side or client-side
3220  * one. See Section 5.2.5 for individual bit definitions. 
3221  * \li u short serviceId - The service ID that should be stamped on requests.
3222  * This field is only used by client-side instances of connection structures. 
3223  * \li struct rx service *service - A pointer to the service structure
3224  * associated with this connection. This field is only used by server-side
3225  * instances of connection structures. 
3226  * \li u long serial - Serial number of the next outgoing packet associated
3227  * with this connection. 
3228  * \li u long lastSerial - Serial number of the last packet received in
3229  * association with this connection. This field is used in computing packet
3230  * skew. 
3231  * \li u short secondsUntilDead - Maximum numer of seconds of silence that
3232  * should be tolerated from the connection's peer before calls will be
3233  * terminated with an RX CALL DEAD error. 
3234  * \li u char secondsUntilPing - The number of seconds between "pings"
3235  * (keep-alive probes) when at least one call is active on this connection. 
3236  * \li u char securityIndex - The index of the security object being used by
3237  * this connection. This number selects a slot in the security class array
3238  * maintained by the service associated with the connection. 
3239  * \li long error - Records the latest error code for calls occurring on this
3240  * connection. 
3241  * \li struct rx securityClass *securityObject - A pointer to the security
3242  * object used by this connection. This should coincide with the slot value
3243  * chosen by the securityIndex field described above. 
3244  * \li VOID *securityData - A pointer to a region dedicated to hosting any
3245  * storage required by the security object being used by this connection. 
3246  * \li u short securityHeaderSize - The length in bytes of the portion of the
3247  * packet header before the user's data that contains the security module's
3248  * information. 
3249  * \li u short securityMaxTrailerSize - The length in bytes of the packet
3250  * trailer, appearing after the user's data, as mandated by the connection's
3251  * security module. 
3252  * \li struct rxevent *challengeEvent -Pointer to an event that is scheduled
3253  * when the server side of the connection is challenging the client to
3254  * authenticate itself. 
3255  * \li int lastSendTime - The last time a packet was sent on this connection. 
3256  * \li long maxSerial - The largest serial number seen on incoming packets. 
3257  * \li u short hardDeadTime - The maximum number of seconds that any call on
3258  * this connection may execute. This serves to throttle runaway calls. 
3259  * 
3260  *      \subsubsection sec5-3-2-3 Section 5.3.2.3: struct rx peer 
3261  * 
3262  * \par
3263  * For each connection, Rx maintains information describing the entity, or
3264  * peer, on the other side of the wire. A peer is identified by a (host,
3265  * UDP-port) pair. Included in the information kept on this remote
3266  * communication endpoint are such network parameters as the maximum packet
3267  * size supported by the host, current readings on round trip time to
3268  * retransmission delays, and packet skew (see Section 1.2.7). There are also
3269  * congestion control fields, ranging from descriptions of the maximum number
3270  * of packets that may be sent to the peer without pausing and retransmission
3271  * statistics. Peer structures are shared between connections whenever
3272  * possible, and hence are reference-counted. A peer object may be
3273  * garbage-collected if it is not actively referenced by any connection
3274  * structure and a sufficient period of time has lapsed since the reference
3275  * count dropped to zero. 
3276  * \par
3277  * \b fields 
3278  * \li struct rx peer *next - Use to access internal lists. 
3279  * \li u long host - Remote IP address, in network byte order 
3280  * \li u short port - Remote UDP port, in network byte order 
3281  * \li short packetSize - Maximum packet size for this host, if known. 
3282  * \li u long idleWhen - When the refCount reference count field (see below)
3283  * went to zero. 
3284  * \li short refCount - Reference count for this structure 
3285  * \li u char burstSize - Reinitialization size for the burst field (below). 
3286  * \li u char burst - Number of packets that can be transmitted immediately
3287  * without pausing. 
3288  * \li struct clock burstWait - Time delay until new burst aimed at this peer
3289  * is allowed. 
3290  * \li struct queue congestionQueue - Queue of RPC call descriptors that are
3291  * waiting for a non-zero burst value. 
3292  * \li int rtt - Round trip time to the peer, measured in milliseconds. 
3293  * \li struct clock timeout - Current retransmission delay to the peer. 
3294  * \li int nSent - Total number of distinct data packets sent, not including
3295  * retransmissions. 
3296  * \li int reSends - Total number of retransmissions for this peer since the
3297  * peer structure instance was created. 
3298  * \li u long inPacketSkew - Maximum skew on incoming packets (see Section
3299  * 1.2.7) 
3300  * \li u long outPacketSkew - Peer-reported maximum skew on outgoing packets
3301  * (see Section 1.2.7). 
3302  * 
3303  *      \subsubsection sec5-3-2-4 Section 5.3.2.4: struct rx call 
3304  * 
3305  * \par
3306  * This structure records the state of an active call proceeding on a given Rx
3307  * connection. As described above, each connection may have up to RX MAXCALLS
3308  * calls active at any one instant, and thus each connection maintains an array
3309  * of RX MAXCALLS rx call structures. The information contained here is
3310  * specific to the given call; "permanent" call state, such as the call number,
3311  * is maintained in the connection structure itself. 
3312  * \par
3313  * \b fields 
3314  * \li struct queue queue item header - Queueing information for this
3315  * structure. 
3316  * \li struct queue tq - Queue of outgoing ("transmit") packets. 
3317  * \li struct queue rq - Queue of incoming ("receive") packets. 
3318  * \li char *bufPtr - Pointer to the next byte to fill or read in the call's
3319  * current packet, depending on whether it is being transmitted or received. 
3320  * \li u short nLeft - Number of bytes left to read in the first packet in the
3321  * reception queue (see field rq). 
3322  * \li u short nFree - Number of bytes still free in the last packet in the
3323  * transmission queue (see field tq). 
3324  * \li struct rx packet *currentPacket - Pointer to the current packet being
3325  * assembled or read. 
3326  * \li struct rx connection *conn - Pointer to the parent connection for this
3327  * call. 
3328  * \li u long *callNumber - Pointer to call number field within the call's
3329  * current packet. 
3330  * \li u char channel - Index within the parent connection's call array that
3331  * describes this call. 
3332  * \li u char dummy1, dummy2 - These are spare fields, reserved for future use. 
3333  * \li u char state - Current call state. The associated bit definitions appear
3334  * in Section 5.2.7. 
3335  * \li u char mode - Current mode of a call that is in RX STATE ACTIVE state.
3336  * The associated bit definitions appear in Section 5.2.8. 
3337  * \li u char flags - Flags pertaining to the state of the given call. The
3338  * associated bit definitions appear in Section 5.2.7. 
3339  * \li u char localStatus - Local user status information, sent out of band.
3340  * This field is currently not in use, set to zero. 
3341  * \li u char remoteStatus - Remote user status information, received out of
3342  * band.  This field is currently not in use, set to zero. 
3343  * \li long error - Error condition for this call. 
3344  * \li u long timeout - High level timeout for this call 
3345  * \li u long rnext - Next packet sequence number expected to be received. 
3346  * \li u long rprev - Sequence number of the previous packet received. This
3347  * number is used to decide the proper sequence number for the next packet to
3348  * arrive, and may be used to generate a negative acknowledgement. 
3349  * \li u long rwind - Width of the packet receive window for this call. The
3350  * peer must not send packets with sequence numbers greater than or equal to
3351  * rnext + rwind. 
3352  * \li u long tfirst - Sequence number of the first unacknowledged transmit
3353  * packet for this call. 
3354  * \li u long tnext - Next sequence number to use for an outgoing packet. 
3355  * \li u long twind - Width of the packet transmit window for this call. Rx
3356  * cannot assign a sequence number to an outgoing packet greater than or equal
3357  * to tfirst + twind. 
3358  * \li struct rxevent *resendEvent - Pointer to a pending retransmission event,
3359  * if any. 
3360  * \li struct rxevent *timeoutEvent - Pointer to a pending timeout event, if
3361  * any. 
3362  * \li struct rxevent *keepAliveEvent - Pointer to a pending keep-alive event,
3363  * if this is an active call. 
3364  * \li struct rxevent *delayedAckEvent - Pointer to a pending delayed
3365  * acknowledgement packet event, if any. Transmission of a delayed
3366  * acknowledgement packet is scheduled after all outgoing packets for a call
3367  * have been sent. If neither a reply nor a new call are received by the time
3368  * the delayedAckEvent activates, the ack packet will be sent. 
3369  * \li int lastSendTime - Last time a packet was sent for this call. 
3370  * \li int lastReceiveTime - Last time a packet was received for this call. 
3371  * \li VOID (*arrivalProc)() - Pointer to the procedure to call when reply is
3372  * received. 
3373  * \li VOID *arrivalProcHandle - Pointer to the handle to pass to the
3374  * arrivalProc as its first argument. 
3375  * \li VOID *arrivalProcArg - Pointer to an additional argument to pass to the
3376  * given arrivalProc. 
3377  * \li u long lastAcked - Sequence number of the last packet "hard-acked" by
3378  * the receiver. A packet is considered to be hard-acked if an acknowledgement
3379  * is generated after the reader has processed it. The Rx facility may
3380  * sometimes "soft-ack" a windowfull of packets before they have been picked up
3381  * by the receiver. 
3382  * \li u long startTime - The time this call started running. 
3383  * \li u long startWait - The time that a server began waiting for input data
3384  * or send quota. 
3385  * 
3386  *      \subsection sec5-3-3 Section 5.3.3: Packet Formats 
3387  * 
3388  * \par
3389  * The following sections cover the different data formats employed by the
3390  * suite of Rx packet types, as enumerated in Section 5.2.11. A description of
3391  * the most commonly-employed Rx packet header appears first, immediately
3392  * followed by a description of the generic packet container and descriptor.
3393  * The formats for Rx acknowledgement packets and debugging/statistics packets
3394  * are also examined. 
3395  * 
3396  *      \subsubsection sec5-3-3-1 Section 5.3.3.1: struct rx header 
3397  * 
3398  * \par
3399  * Every Rx packet has its own header region, physically located after the
3400  * leading IP/UDP headers. This header contains connection, call, security, and
3401  * sequencing information. Along with a type identifier, these fields allow the
3402  * receiver to properly interpret the packet. In addition, every client relates
3403  * its "epoch", or Rx incarnation date, in each packet. This assists in
3404  * identifying protocol problems arising from reuse of connection identifiers
3405  * due to a client restart. Also included in the header is a byte of
3406  * user-defined status information, allowing out-of-band channel of
3407  * communication for the higher-level application using Rx as a transport
3408  * mechanism. 
3409  * \par
3410  * \b fields 
3411  * \li u long epoch - Birth time of the client Rx facility. 
3412  * \li u long cid - Connection identifier, as defined by the client. The last
3413  * RX CIDSHIFT bits in the cid field identify which of the server-side RX
3414  * MAXCALLS call channels is to receive the packet. 
3415  * \li u long callNumber - The current call number on the chosen call channel. 
3416  * \li u long seq - Sequence number of this packet. Sequence numbers start with
3417  * 0 for each new Rx call. 
3418  * \li u long serial - This packet's serial number. A new serial number is
3419  * stamped on each packet transmitted (or retransmitted). 
3420  * \li u char type - What type of Rx packet this is; see Section 5.2.11 for the
3421  * list of legal definitions. 
3422  * \li u char flags - Flags describing this packet; see Section 5.2.9 for the
3423  * list of legal settings. 
3424  * \li u char userStatus - User-defined status information, uninterpreted by
3425  * the Rx facility itself. This field may be easily set or retrieved from Rx
3426  * packets via calls to the rx GetLocalStatus(), rx SetLocalStatus(), rx
3427  * GetRemoteStatus(), and rx SetRemoteStatus() macros. 
3428  * \li u char securityIndex - Index in the associated server-side service class
3429  * of the security object used by this call. 
3430  * \li u short serviceId - The server-provided service ID to which this packet
3431  * is directed. 
3432  * \li u short spare - This field was originally a true spare, but is now used
3433  * by the built-in rxkad security module for packet header checksums. See the
3434  * descriptions of the related rx IsUsingPktChecksum(), rx GetPacketCksum(),
3435  * and rx SetPacketCksum() macros. 
3436  * 
3437  *      \subsubsection sec5-3-3-2 Section 5.3.3.2: struct rx packet 
3438  * 
3439  * \par
3440  * This structure is used to describe an Rx packet, and includes the wire
3441  * version of the packet contents, where all fields exist in network byte
3442  * order. It also includes acknowledgement, length, type, and queueing
3443  * information. 
3444  * \par
3445  * \b fields 
3446  * \li struct queue queueItemHeader - field used for internal queueing. 
3447  * \li u char acked - If non-zero, this field indicates that this packet has
3448  * been tentatively (soft-) acknowledged. Thus, the packet has been accepted by
3449  * the rx peer entity on the other side of the connection, but has not yet
3450  * necessarily been passed to the true reader. The sender is not free to throw
3451  * the packet away, as it might still get dropped by the peer before it is
3452  * delivered to its destination process. 
3453  * \li short length - Length in bytes of the user data section. 
3454  * \li u char packetType - The type of Rx packet described by this record. The
3455  * set of legal choices is available in Section 5.2.11. 
3456  * \li struct clock retryTime - The time when this packet should be
3457  * retransmitted next. 
3458  * \li struct clock timeSent - The last time this packet was transmitted. 
3459  * \li struct rx header header - A copy of the internal Rx packet header. 
3460  * \li wire - The text of the packet as it appears on the wire. This structure
3461  * has the following sub-fields: 
3462  *      \li u long head[RX HEADER SIZE/sizeof(long)] The wire-level contents of
3463  *      IP, UDP, and Rx headers. 
3464  *      \li u long data[RX MAX PACKET DATA SIZE/sizeof(long)] The wire form of
3465  *      the packet's "payload", namely the user data it carries. 
3466  * 
3467  *      \subsubsection sec5-3-3-3 Section 5.3.3.3: struct rx ackPacket 
3468  * 
3469  * \par
3470  * This is the format for the data portion of an Rx acknowledgement packet,
3471  * used to inform a peer entity performing packet transmissions that a subset
3472  * of its packets has been properly received. 
3473  * \par
3474  * \b fields 
3475  * \li u short bufferSpace - Number of packet buffers available. Specifically,
3476  * the number of packet buffers that the ack packet's sender is willing to
3477  * provide for data on this or subsequent calls. This number does not have to
3478  * fully accurate; it is acceptable for the sender to provide an estimate. 
3479  * \li u short maxSkew - The maximum difference seen between the serial number
3480  * of the packet being acknowledged and highest packet yet received. This is an
3481  * indication of the degree to which packets are arriving out of order at the
3482  * receiver. 
3483  * \li u long firstPacket - The serial number of the first packet in the list
3484  * of acknowledged packets, as represented by the acks field below. 
3485  * \li u long previousPacket - The previous packet serial number received. 
3486  * \li u long serial - The serial number of the packet prompted the
3487  * acknowledgement. 
3488  * \li u char reason - The reason given for the acknowledgement; legal values
3489  * for this field are described in Section 5.2.13. 
3490  * \li u char nAcks - Number of acknowledgements active in the acks array
3491  * immediately following. 
3492  * \li u char acks[RX MAXACKS] - Up to RX MAXACKS packet acknowledgements. The
3493  * legal values for each slot in the acks array are described in Section
3494  * 5.2.14. Basically, these fields indicate either positive or negative
3495  * acknowledgements. 
3496  * 
3497  * \par
3498  * All packets with serial numbers prior to firstPacket are implicitly
3499  * acknowledged by this packet, indicating that they have been fully processed
3500  * by the receiver. Thus, the sender need no longer be concerned about them,
3501  * and may release all of the resources that they occupy. Packets with serial
3502  * numbers firstPacket + nAcks and higher are not acknowledged by this ack
3503  * packet. Packets with serial numbers in the range [firstPacket, firstPacket +
3504  * nAcks) are explicitly acknowledged, yet their sender-side resources must not
3505  * yet be released, as there is yet no guarantee that the receiver will not
3506  * throw them away before they can be processed there. 
3507  * \par
3508  * There are some details of importance to be noted. For one, receiving a
3509  * positive acknowlegement via the acks array does not imply that the
3510  * associated packet is immune from being dropped before it is read and
3511  * processed by the receiving entity. It does, however, imply that the sender
3512  * should stop retransmitting the packet until further notice. Also, arrival of
3513  * an ack packet should prompt the transmitter to immediately retransmit all
3514  * packets it holds that have not been explicitly acknowledged and that were
3515  * last transmitted with a serial number less than the highest serial number
3516  * acknowledged by the acks array. 
3517  * Note: The fields in this structure are always kept in wire format, namely in
3518  * network byte order. 
3519  * 
3520  *      \subsection sec5-3-4 Section 5.3.4: Debugging and Statistics 
3521  * 
3522  * \par
3523  * The following structures are defined in support of the debugging and
3524  * statistics-gathering interfaces provided by Rx. 
3525  * 
3526  *      \subsubsection sec5-3-4-1 Section 5.3.4.1: struct rx stats 
3527  * 
3528  * \par
3529  * This structure maintains Rx statistics, and is gathered by such tools as the
3530  * rxdebug program. It must be possible for all of the fields placed in this
3531  * structure to be successfully converted from their on-wire network byte
3532  * orderings to the host-specific ordering. 
3533  * \par
3534  * \b fields 
3535  * \li int packetRequests - Number of packet allocation requests processed. 
3536  * \li int noPackets[RX N PACKET CLASSES] - Number of failed packet requests,
3537  * organized per allocation class. 
3538  * \li int socketGreedy - Whether the SO GREEDY setting succeeded for the Rx
3539  * socket. 
3540  * \li int bogusPacketOnRead - Number of inappropriately short packets
3541  * received. 
3542  * \li int bogusHost - Contains the host address from the last bogus packet
3543  * received. 
3544  * \li int noPacketOnRead - Number of attempts to read a packet off the wire
3545  * when there was actually no packet there. 
3546  * \li int noPacketBuffersOnRead - Number of dropped data packets due to lack
3547  * of packet buffers. 
3548  * \li int selects - Number of selects waiting for a packet arrival or a
3549  * timeout. 
3550  * \li int sendSelects - Number of selects forced when sending packets. 
3551  * \li int packetsRead[RX N PACKET TYPES] - Total number of packets read,
3552  * classified by type. 
3553  * \li int dataPacketsRead - Number of unique data packets read off the wire. 
3554  * \li int ackPacketsRead - Number of ack packets read. 
3555  * \li int dupPacketsRead - Number of duplicate data packets read. 
3556  * \li int spuriousPacketsRead - Number of inappropriate data packets. 
3557  * \li int packetsSent[RX N PACKET TYPES] - Number of packet transmissions,
3558  * broken down by packet type. 
3559  * \li int ackPacketsSent - Number of ack packets sent. 
3560  * \li int pingPacketsSent - Number of ping packets sent. 
3561  * \li int abortPacketsSent - Number of abort packets sent. 
3562  * \li int busyPacketsSent - Number of busy packets sent. 
3563  * \li int dataPacketsSent - Number of unique data packets sent. 
3564  * \li int dataPacketsReSent - Number of retransmissions. 
3565  * \li int dataPacketsPushed - Number of retransmissions pushed early by a
3566  * negative acknowledgement. 
3567  * \li int ignoreAckedPacket - Number of packets not retransmitted because they
3568  * have already been acked. 
3569  * \li int struct clock totalRtt - Total round trip time measured for packets,
3570  * used to compute average time figure. 
3571  * \li struct clock minRtt - Minimum round trip time measured for packets. 
3572  * struct clock maxRtt - Maximum round trip time measured for packets. 
3573  * \li&nb