Unix CM: Make rootVolume array big enough
[openafs.git] / doc / xml / UserGuide / auusg003.xml
1 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
2 <preface id="HDRWQ1">
3   <title>About This Guide</title>
4
5   <para>This section describes the purpose, organization, and conventions of this document.</para>
6
7   <sect1 id="HDRPREFAUDPUR">
8     <title>Audience and Purpose</title>
9
10     <para>This guide describes concepts and procedures for accessing information stored in the AFS filespace. It is intended for AFS
11     users who are familiar with UNIX but not necessarily AFS.</para>
12
13     <para>The first chapter describes basic AFS concepts and guidelines for using it, and summarizes some of the differences between
14     the UNIX file system and AFS. The remaining chapters explain how to perform basic AFS functions, including logging in, changing
15     a password, listing information, protecting files, creating groups, and troubleshooting. Concepts important to a specific task
16     or group of related tasks are presented in context, just prior to the procedures. Many examples are provided.</para>
17
18     <para>Instructions generally include only the commands and command options necessary for a specific task. For a complete list of
19     AFS commands and description of all options available on every command, see the <emphasis>OpenAFS Administration
20     Reference</emphasis>.</para>
21   </sect1>
22
23   <sect1 id="HDRPREFORGAN">
24     <title>Document Organization</title>
25
26     <para>This document is divided into the following chapters.</para>
27
28     <para><link linkend="HDRWQ2">An Introduction to OpenAFS</link> introduces the basic concepts and functions of AFS. To use AFS
29     successfully, it is important to be familiar with the terms and concepts described in this chapter.</para>
30
31     <para><link linkend="HDRWQ20">Using OpenAFS</link> describes how to use AFS's basic features: how to log in and authenticate,
32     and access AFS files and directories in AFS.</para>
33
34     <para><link linkend="HDRWQ38">Displaying Information about OpenAFS</link> describes how to display information about AFS volume
35     quota and location, file server machine status, and the foreign cells you can access.</para>
36
37     <para><link linkend="HDRWQ44">Protecting Your Directories and Files</link> describes how to protect your data using AFS access
38     control lists (ACLs).</para>
39
40     <para><link linkend="HDRWQ60">Using Groups</link> describes how to create and manage groups.</para>
41
42     <para><link linkend="HDRWQ76">Troubleshooting</link> outlines step-by-step diagnostic and corrective steps for specific
43     problems.</para>
44
45     <para><link linkend="HDRWQ80">Appendix A, Using the NFS/AFS Translator</link> describes how to use the NFS/AFS Translator to
46     access the AFS filespace from an NFS client machine.</para>
47
48     <para><link linkend="HDRWQ86">Appendix B, OpenAFS Command Syntax and Online Help</link> describes AFS command syntax and how to
49     obtain online information about commands.</para>
50
51     <para><link linkend="HDRWQ90">Appendix C, Glossary</link> defines terms used in the <emphasis>OpenAFS User
52     Guide</emphasis>.</para>
53   </sect1>
54
55   <sect1 id="HDRUSERFRONTHOWTO">
56     <title>How To Use This Document</title>
57
58     <para>Before you begin using OpenAFS, read <link linkend="HDRWQ2">An Introduction to OpenAFS</link>. Next, follow the procedures
59     outlined in <link linkend="HDRWQ20">Using OpenAFS</link> to get started using OpenAFS as an authenticated user. It describes how to
60     access files in the AFS filespace and how to end an AFS session. Consult the other chapters as you need to perform the tasks
61     they describe.</para>
62   </sect1>
63
64   <sect1 id="HDRPREFRELATE">
65     <title>Related Documents</title>
66
67     <para>The AFS Documentation Kit also includes the following documents:
68
69     <itemizedlist>
70       <listitem>
71         <para>The <emphasis>OpenAFS Administration Reference</emphasis> details the syntax of each AFS command and is intended for
72         the experienced AFS administrator, programmer, or user. For each AFS command, the <emphasis>OpenAFS Administration
73         Reference</emphasis> lists the command syntax, aliases and abbreviations, description, arguments, warnings, output,
74         examples, and related topics. Commands are organized alphabetically.</para>
75       </listitem>
76
77       <listitem>
78         <para>The <emphasis>OpenAFS Administration Guide</emphasis> describes concepts and procedures necessary for administering an
79         AFS cell, as well as more extensive coverage of the topics in the <emphasis>OpenAFS User Guide</emphasis>.</para>
80       </listitem>
81
82       <listitem>
83         <para>The <emphasis>OpenAFS Quick Beginnings</emphasis> provides instructions for installing AFS server and client
84         machines.</para>
85       </listitem>
86     </itemizedlist>
87 </para>
88   </sect1>
89
90   <sect1 id="HDRTYPO_CONV">
91     <title>Typographical Conventions</title>
92
93     <para>This document uses the following typographical conventions:
94
95     <itemizedlist>
96       <listitem>
97         <para>Command and option names appear in <emphasis role="bold">bold type</emphasis> in syntax definitions, examples, and
98         running text. Names of directories, files, machines, partitions, volumes, and users also appear in <emphasis
99         role="bold">bold type</emphasis>.</para>
100       </listitem>
101
102       <listitem>
103         <para>Variable information appears in <emphasis>italic type</emphasis>. This includes user-supplied information on command
104         lines and the parts of prompts that differ depending on who issues the command. New terms also appear in <emphasis>italic
105         type</emphasis>.</para>
106       </listitem>
107
108       <listitem>
109         <para>Examples of screen output and file contents appear in <computeroutput>monospace type</computeroutput>.</para>
110       </listitem>
111     </itemizedlist>
112 </para>
113
114     <para>In addition, the following symbols appear in command syntax definitions, both in the documentation and in AFS online help
115     statements. When issuing a command, do not type these symbols.
116
117     <itemizedlist>
118       <listitem>
119         <para>Square brackets <emphasis role="bold">[ ]</emphasis> surround optional items.</para>
120       </listitem>
121
122       <listitem>
123         <para>Angle brackets <emphasis role="bold">&lt; &gt;</emphasis> surround user-supplied values in AFS commands.</para>
124       </listitem>
125
126       <listitem>
127         <para>A superscripted plus sign <emphasis role="bold">+</emphasis> follows an argument that accepts more than one
128         value.</para>
129       </listitem>
130
131       <listitem>
132         <para>The percent sign <computeroutput>%</computeroutput> represents the regular command shell prompt. Some operating
133         systems possibly use a different character for this prompt.</para>
134       </listitem>
135
136       <listitem>
137         <para>The number sign <computeroutput>#</computeroutput> represents the command shell prompt for the local superuser
138         <emphasis role="bold">root</emphasis>. Some operating systems possibly use a different character for this prompt.</para>
139       </listitem>
140
141       <listitem>
142         <para>The pipe symbol <emphasis role="bold">|</emphasis> in a command syntax statement separates mutually exclusive values
143         for an argument.</para>
144       </listitem>
145     </itemizedlist>
146 </para>
147
148     <para>For additional information on AFS commands, including a description of command string components, acceptable abbreviations
149     and aliases, and how to get online help for commands, see <link linkend="HDRWQ86">Appendix B, OpenAFS Command Syntax and Online
150     Help</link>.</para>
151   </sect1>
152 </preface>